Loss of power in high gear - problem solved

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Loss of power in high gear - problem solved
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dunlap - Orlando, Florida on Saturday, April 08, 2017 - 05:59 pm:

For the last month or so, I've noticed a steady decrease of power while driving my 1924 Coupe in high gear. The car would really struggle when I shifted to high and just didn't seem to have any oomph.

Today, I changed the spark plugs. Two were quite dirty, the other two weren't so bad.

I fired it up and the power is fully restored. It drives like a rocket again.

I'm posting this for the benefit of others who may suffer similar issues with loss of power. I fretted for a couple of weeks about all sorts of horrible and nasty things that may be causing the problem. I got lucky today and started with what seemed like a simple solution and I hit the target. Hope others find similar relief.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, April 08, 2017 - 06:11 pm:

Thanks for the info.
Spark plugs are an important part of the system.
In the olden days we had a machine that would sand blast spark plugs to clean them.


I am looking for relief so I'll head for the head!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, April 08, 2017 - 06:21 pm:

Can you post pictures of the electrodes of the offending plugs? Maybe they can be cleaned, filed, regapped, and carried as spares. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, April 08, 2017 - 07:44 pm:

Fred...TMI!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, April 08, 2017 - 07:52 pm:

Take a compression test dry & wet to check the condition of the rings. While it's possible you're pumping a bit of oil in those cylinders it's more likely, especially if you don't see/smell smoke, that you need to learn to properly set your carb needle. It's either burning oil or a rich mixture causing the fouling. Running a hot air pipe? I understand without one certain cylinders can run differently and might foul too. On my first T, with absolutely no idea about how to adjust the needle, I fouled the plugs so bad the car wouldn't start.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Saturday, April 08, 2017 - 08:28 pm:

It is also possible that a slight air leak on one of you intake manifold connections is letting two cylinders burn richer than the other two cylinders.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, April 09, 2017 - 06:12 am:

That's what I was wondering. Which two cylinders? If 1 and 2 were both fouled, I'd be looking for a vacuum leak on 3 and 4 or vice versa.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Michael Rogers on Sunday, April 09, 2017 - 06:50 am:

James, I believe an air leak would cause it to run lean, not rich.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, April 09, 2017 - 07:20 am:

James Michael - to get a car that has a leak in one if the intakes you'll open up the carb needle until all cylinders run, thus the cylinders without the leak will get a much too rich mixture, eventually causing fouled spark plugs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Sunday, April 09, 2017 - 07:21 am:

The air leak would cause two cylinders to run lean and not foul the plugs.

Getting them enough fuel to keep the engine running would cause the other two cylinders to run rich and foul the plugs.

Not having the air pipe on the back of the carb would most often cause spark plugs #1 and #2 to foul.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Sunday, April 09, 2017 - 07:23 am:

Fred, I was told in the olden days that those sand blasted plugs then had a rougher surface that let the carbon collect and adhere better, so that is why it was discontinued.


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