Old Photo-Winter Capital of America

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo-Winter Capital of America
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 08:52 pm:

Pic says New Orleans Circa 1910. Love all the trolley action. :-)




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 09:42 pm:

Four streetcar tracks, lots of horse buggies and one car. Odd that the car doesn't look like a wide-track.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 09:44 pm:

What is the make of the car ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 10:14 pm:

i think it is a Buick. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 - 11:58 pm:

I don't recall ever hearing that Buick offered a wide track. I am fairly sure that Mott (an early axle supplier to Buick and many others) did supply wide track axles to others. Maybe Buick did? I don't know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 10:41 am:

I don't know how early or late Buick offered a wide-track, but I know it was offered in 1912. My '12 is a wide-track.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 03:53 pm:

That's a neat picture. And the environmentalists are worried about birds not being able to co-habitate with big windmill farms?? This mess of wires was far worse!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 04:12 pm:

I think two of those streetcar tracks are still in place, in use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 05:23 pm:

That is Canal Street. It is the widest commercial street in the world, store-front to store-front. The tracks for the streetcars (we don't call them trollies) are on the covering over a massive drainage canal (hence the name) that takes storm water to the Mississippi River, which is several blocks from where this picture was taken - straight ahead.

The French Quarter is on the left. The Business District and American Sector is on the right. When the 'ugly Americans' came down the river with their cotton and made fortunes, they were shunned by the mostly French old-timers, so they settled apart, upriver from the French Quarter. It's now known as the Garden District.

There was great enmity between the two groups. Lots of fights, murders, etc. However, Canal Street was the main retail district of New Orleans, and was considered "neutral ground" by both groups. Ever since, what everyone else calls a Median or divider in a separated street or avenue, we in New Orleans call a Neutral Ground.

With the exception of the Canal Street canal, most drainage in New Orleans flows to pumping stations, which pump the storm water to Lake Pontchartrain. Originally the pumping stations, home of the world's largest screw-pumps, and rivaled only by those in Paris, were located mostly at the edge of the Lake. As the lowlands around the lake were developed, the pumping stations were fitted with outflow canals to the lake, bordered on both sides by levees. Some of those levees collapsed in Katrina, allowing the lake to flood the city. And, no, they were NOT purposely dynamited to determine which parts of the city flooded, as was surmised by some news outlets.

Since Katrina the Army Corps of Engineers, who owns and operates the drainage system, has spent untold billions on new pumps at lake's edge, strengthened levees, and built a barrier that can be closed where the Lake meets the Gulf of Mexico, to forestall backwash of the Gulf into the Lake.

Yes, the streetcars still run on Canal Street and other streets in the city, although nowhere near the number that ran when I was growing up there. Until the '60's, you could ride anywhere in the City for 7 cents, and were given a 'transfer' that would allow you to catch intersecting routes without paying more. If you planned your route, you could 'ride the loop' and go downtown and back home for 7 cents. Now it's $1.25, and no transfers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 05:35 pm:

Peter,

Thank you so much for the history lesson I've learned a lot. It's amazing what you can learn on this forum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 09:06 pm:

Very interesting! I visited there once about fifteen years ago (about a year before Katrina). We were passing through, but spent almost a day there and loved the place. Your information explains some of what I saw then and have heard since. I have always wanted to go back for a couple days.

GFtE, Okay, Buick did build some wide tracks. I would sure like to see yours up close. I have seen a few photos of it, but not at angles I noticed the wide track. A long time good friend (one of my Horseless Carriage mentors a long time ago) had a 1912 Buick. I am not sure what model, one of the smaller ones (a 29 perhaps?).
I have always been fond of Buicks from that era.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 09:35 pm:

But did Buick build any streetcars ??? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 10:09 pm:

We stayed in the French Quarter in 2007, rebuilding still going on, and it was very inexpensive to stay there at that time. The "riverfront" streetcars had just started running, Canal Streets weren't yet. Had a great three days and left, as one should leave NOL, on the steamboat Delta Queen heading towards Memphis.
Loved the city, (as much as a country person can love a city)at at many neat places, including Tujaks (probably not correct spelling)the 2nd oldest cafe in America, and of course had Benets at Cafe Du Mond. And never learned how to spell all that stuff! Also rode the Natchez steamboat on the city tour.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vieux Carre on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 10:55 pm:

The car is a Glide, made in Illinois but there was a dealership in New Orleans.
Vern
Glide in New Orleans


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 01:24 am:

Interesting!
"Ride in a Glide, then decide!"
Thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 08:26 am:

Great picture. This my most favorite city.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 08:35 am:

Dennis Seth.... I heartedly agree! Wonderful photo, and love the history lesson!!

I love the freedom of a care, but bemoan Detroit and surrounding area's virtual sustain for mass transit. Only a coupl e little bits... mostly for tourism, not real transit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 08:41 am:

My wife and I were in New Orleans a few months before Katrina. While there we took a riverboat ride up and down the Mississippi River. It was pointed out that New Orleans lies 18' (I could be a little off, but it's about that much) below the river level.

This information made me wonder two things:

1. Why would people locate a city lower than the water level in the first place when there must be better spots a little up-River.

2. How did they do it when initially there were no electrically powered pumps to drain it?

Don't get me wrong. It's a great city and we had a great time. The elevation relative to big water and the drainage requirements just seem odd to me.


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