Don't over tighten your rear hub bolts

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Don't over tighten your rear hub bolts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 06:59 pm:

Installed some new bolts since I had the brake drum off and really cranked them down. After I painted the wheel I noticed the front flange wasn't flat anymore. It is drawn in at the points where the bolts went. Ooops.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 07:04 pm:

Mark you may have also had some of the old (modern) made hub bolts. There was a run of them a few years back that had issues with stripping out the threads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 07:19 pm:

Threads were fine ... these actually are the new bolts from Langs. This was not the fault of the bolts ... it was me with a long handled socket wrench. I screwed up. I don't think there is a safety issue just looks odd now that it's freshly painted. Went over it with 6x steel wool to knock off the shine and it looks better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 07:22 pm:

Don't feel bad, I did the same on my new wheels:

pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 07:49 pm:

I was going to comment on this thread but I think id be off the Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 07:52 pm:

:-O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 08:13 pm:

Mark, what kind of wood are those spokes made of. I like to see the grain run the length of the spoke, not around them. Are they Hickory?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 08:19 pm:

They are hickory spokes from Lang's:

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2800HS-HY.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 08:25 pm:

Mark

Welcome to the club. An awful lot of folks do that on their first job. Are you even sure they were flat to start? I've never seen flat plates and always have to straighten them prior to rebuilding the wheels.

I snug them down...wait 3-4 days for the wood to compress and resnug to the same amount...then peen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 08:32 pm:

I know alot of people scoff at the idea, but I use a torque wrench on alot of model T items. I like the idea of knowing it is tight and if multiple bolts (wheel hub, timing cover, main bolts, rod bolts, etc)that they are all drawn down even. It can prevent what happened above and prevent bolt breakage from over tightening. I know there are no published torque values, but it's not hard to come up with something.

Just saying, it works for me, your mileage may vary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 10:50 pm:

I have some other plates. Guess I'll switch it out with a flat one and go with a lighter touch next time. It was only one wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Weisgerber- Vancouver WA. on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 11:37 pm:

Mark Strange, your wheels look fantastic, wonderful workmanship!

Charles


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, April 14, 2017 - 11:38 pm:

The plates aren't hardened. You can get them pretty flat in a shop press.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Saturday, April 15, 2017 - 12:45 am:

Good to know Mark. They sure are pretty!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, April 15, 2017 - 06:45 am:

Hal, a couple of the spokes show fiddleback grain in the spokes. This is a highly desirous pattern in timbers for decorative work. It does not have an effect on the strength and serviceability of the timber.

Mark, your wheels look to be Kelsey loose lug types. Our Canadian sourced wheels come with lug nuts which have an inbuilt flat washer looking land on the back. Are yours just plain nuts? Snyders now have the correct nuts available if you need them.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, April 15, 2017 - 09:42 am:

These are the lug nuts on my wheels, the washer surface is part of the nut:

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2848B.aspx

I built these wheels shortly after I got Betsy because she had a couple of slightly loose spokes. Once the wheels were built, I figured I had nothing to lose by trying to shim the few loose spokes on my current Hayes wheels. So, I bought a spoke jack and some shims on Ebay.

The shimmed wheels are still tight and giving good service after four years, so I'm still running them. The new wheels are in storage in the basement for the time when the shimmed wheels give out. :-)



(Message edited by cudaman on April 15, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, April 15, 2017 - 08:16 pm:

They're the ones for looselugs Mark. I couldn't make them out in your photos.I bought a set for my 1917 shooting brake that has demountable wheels. Being totally machined, they were too perfect. I scrounged around for a set of originals and had them re-plated. These appear to be forged, and consequently each is a little different and more rustic looking. They look more in keeping with the used clamps and replated rims I used.

Allan from down under.


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