Is this a Pullford kit?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Is this a Pullford kit?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Saturday, April 15, 2017 - 11:22 pm:

Hey gang. I'm needing some help identifying a slightly obscure accessory. There's an auction in Iowa later this month that has what I believe to be a Pullford tractor conversion kit on it. I'd like to own one of these kits, because they were built in Quincy Illinois, about forty miles from my hometown. The problem is I've done extensive research on these kits, but I'm no expert. I'm hoping that someone out there who owns one of these kits can look at the pictures and tell me if it's a Pullford or one of the other numerous kits built to convert a T into a tractor.

If the pictures aren't very good, blame my cousin. He was doing the recon for me, as I was at work and he was avoiding family. Haha

Pullford?

Pullford?

Pullford?

Pullford?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 09:37 pm:

definity NOT pullford . May be a Shaw?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 09:39 pm:

Its very cool. Good luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Koke Twigg-Smith on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 11:30 pm:

Pull Ford says so on the hub caps of the driven wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 06:40 am:

It's Pullford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim williams Baldwinsville NY. on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 08:00 am:

You are 100 percent correct Ron pullfords are easy to spot
Because of the c-channel irons on the left and right of the T
Frame at the rear.
This is a nice tractor Jared I hope you can win the bid.
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 08:42 am:

So only Pullford kits had the C channels?

Dean, the main reason I thought it was a Pullford is because it has the same drive mechanism as yours.

Somewhere I have some Pullford literature that I picked up for this exact purpose, but for the life of me I can't remember where I "filed" it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim williams Baldwinsville NY. on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 09:13 am:

Don't quote me on this but pullford may have made them for
Montgomery Ward for their Trailblazer and Sears for the
Handy farmer kits Ron can probably shed more light on the
Subject. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 08:13 pm:

Montgomery Ward had C channels - as did numerous others. There's been a lot of speculation that MW made the "Thrifty Farmer" kits for Sears as well (and if you compare the two kits, there are enough similarities). The Sears and MW kits had the teeth on the bull gear facing out (towards the wheel). The Pullford kit had the teeth on the bull gear facing in (towards the hub). The advantage of the externally-facing teeth (supposedly) was they would not allow small rocks to lodge between the teeth and chip your bull gear or destroy your drive pinion.

There were tons of kits available from the late teens to the early 30s and many of these kits are difficult to distinguish from one another (e.g. the Pullford looks a lot like the Fon-du-Lac and the Montgomery Ward looks a lot like the Sears). Am pretty sure the kit pictured above is a Pullford (Koke's eyes are better than mine because I cannot clearly read Pullford on the axle caps - if you can Jared, that is definitive proof) based on the shape of the hub and the way the spokes attach to the hub.

She's a really nice tractor - and doesn't appear to need much.

(Message edited by Conversiont on April 17, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Rodell, Jr. on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:24 pm:

I was told by Chad Elmore, who wrote a history of the Peru Plow and Wheel Company, that the Sears and Montgomery Wards tractor kits were manufactured by that business in Peru, Illinois.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:29 pm:

That would explain the similarities between the kits and I would defer to Mr. Elmore's expertise.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:29 pm:

Very cool hope you win it. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 11:05 pm:

Ok. Thank you for your information, everybody. I was confused by the phrasing of jim williams' comments.

Dad has told me this story multiple times since I got into Model T's and found out there was a tractor kit manufactured in Quincy. A long time ago, like 25 or 30 years ago, he and Grandpa were at an auction trying to buy a Case car. They didn't buy that one, but they eventually found one. While they were at that auction, there was a Chevy with a Pullford kit on it. They didn't buy it, and it only brought $25. Does anybody have Doc Brown's phone number? I need to call him up and ask if I can borrow his car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 11:40 pm:

Ron, Pullfords use a 3 inch I beam, and do NOT use a roller Pinion. I have copys of two Pullford Manuals that verify this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:48 am:

I had a set of those hubs that I sold to somebody that needed them. They are pretty ingenious. They are the standard Ford hubs with the wood spokes gone and short pieces of tubing that will just fit over the bolts installed instead. Ford hub, Ford bolts. Cheap and easy.

I can't remember what he said they fit but I didn't think it was a Pullford. I'd like to have it!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:48 am:

I had a set of those hubs that I sold to somebody that needed them. They are pretty ingenious. They are the standard Ford hubs with the wood spokes gone and short pieces of tubing that will just fit over the bolts installed instead. Ford hub, Ford bolts. Cheap and easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Weiss on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 05:53 am:

That is not a Pullford
Pullford I channels mount below frame from brackets at front mountings
Pullford hubs have caps that are cast Pullford
Some time ago there was a post here on building new pinions like those in your photos
Good luck at the auction


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 06:43 am:

Years ago I found a Pullford kit on what was left of a Model A roadster in a local junkyard. I could have bought it for $200.oo. I left it and bought a 55 crown vic from him instead for $60.00. Wish I had bought both of them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 09:13 am:

Other option is Staude, similar hubs - but the mounting beams seem different than a Staude (these are flared like a Pullford and think Staude's were straight).

Stan - I bought those roller hubs from you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 09:33 am:

Been a while since I've been to Piquette (about 6 years now). As I recall however, they had a Pullford conversion on display. Found a picture of it on the web (described as a Pullford) and you'll note it is a clone of the one Jared pictured above (including the hub and roller drive pinion). Perhaps someone on the Forum who volunteers there could confirm. Here's the picture:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:26 pm:

Ron, The conversion at piquette is labeled wrong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 07:38 pm:

My friend Pete Snep at North Manchester,Indiana has one very much like this,that he bought from me.A massive,heavy thing compared to other conversions.
I have been wracking my brain trying to remember what make it is.
This I do recall:they also built a heavy truck conversion unit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred B on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 08:01 pm:

the photo at top, the driver is at the front of the wheel, the bottom photo the driver is at the back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 08:49 pm:

I have had 2 of those, one was a Sears and the other was a Wards. Of the 2 I only built one up to use and it was a HORRIBLE thing. I put in an aluminum Warford for low speed and that one had cleats while the other had lugs.

I plowed snow with a homemade back blade (about shook the fillings out of my teeth on frozen ground), drove it across the fields and into the woods for fire wood with a trailer, pulled deer back home, used a spring tooth drag to work banks on a pond that I had dug and it would pull for all those things but...the wheels don't spin. Instead they lock right down and the pinion grabs the bull gear and climbs and before you know what has happened the front end is up in the air.

That was one dangerous machine I wish I would have kept! If you have one I would advise caution on how you hook up anything, a low speed gearbox will help you not die so fast. Tractors in general are dangerous with that type of drive that can "hook up" and ride the gears without spinning wheels. Your neck and head don't make a good roll bar.

Would I buy another one, YES. Would I use another one to pull things around...NO, extremely dangerous design and I have other tractors that are more safe but still not completely safe.

Tim Moore

Ford Golden Jubilee #19, the earliest known of the NAA series, the "Golden's" where the commemorative for the 50th anniversary of the Ford Motor Company.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 08:54 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 08:56 am:

There are a lot of difference from the original picture to the ad I just posted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kelly Barnett on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 01:05 pm:

I don't have better photos of it right now but this is the one that I did some work to in the past. And it says PULLFORD on the hub caps on the back wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glenn Heim on Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 01:16 pm:

Jared The tractor attachment at this sale is definitely a STAUDE built in St Paul Minnesota. This attachment used these wheels from 1917 thru the mid 1920's 38" diameter with 66 teeth on the bull gear and used a roller pinion. There is a long single roller bearing. 1918 models and newer had a removable sleeve in the hub. The attachment at Piquette is also a Staude. Staude used at least eight different wheels between 1916 till end of production in about 1940. Pullford used about five over the same time.


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