Motor repair shop-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Motor repair shop-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 09:52 am:

Well. Wouldn't you like to walk into that room today?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 10:02 am:

Mmm, mmm, mmm. Thank you for sharing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 10:15 am:

Great Herb!!! I wonder if the shaft is powered with a T motor? Love the anvil base.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 11:37 am:

I don't know where you find these but I'm glad you do. What wonderful places these take us.
They seem to have done a lot of grinding/polishing from the number of wheels on the wall at our left. The motors (?) on the floor might be motorcycle. The wood board floor and window lighting are superb.
Thanks again
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 12:37 pm:

I HAVE THE ANVIL IN MY SHOP.THRE IS A NEAT OLD SHOP ON U TUBE,STEAM POWER'D,I THINK YOU TYPE IN OLD STEAM SHOP.ITS VERY NEAT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 12:43 pm:

not much there i dont have. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 12:43 pm:

When I saw this one I was thinking of you Richard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 01:14 pm:

Could the engines on the floor be for marine? Got pretty big flywheels. That shop is way too clean for those days. Dave in Bellingham,WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 01:29 pm:

Thanks Herb. You know what I like.
I can't recognize anything specific. Maybe someone else can. Could be marine, David.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson-Montrose,CO on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 02:03 pm:

I was sitting in the grocery store parking lot...The 'Little Lady" was picking up a few things she forgot...Looking at the Forum on my phone and saw this post....First thing I thought of is "Wait till Richard see's this he'll love it"...
Scroll down and he's already seen it....
Thanks for posting,,,great photo,,,I could spend hours there...
Carl,,aka Slim ,over at the Lazy S Ranch..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 02:21 pm:

Same place, different angle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 02:39 pm:

Oh My Gosh. As if it being Easter wasn't great enough.
I see a propeller so boat makes sense. I think I can read Winchester on the wooden box.
Truly Wonderful.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 02:45 pm:

So start identifying things.
What is the long handled tool on the right side of the photo?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Trumpy on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 03:08 pm:

What great pictures. Takes me back to working at my grandfather's ship yard in the summers during highschool. It looked about the same except the machines had been converted to electric before WWII. The line shaft was still hanging in the overhead with the big wheels and clutches to engage them. The wood handles hanging down were used to shift the wheels in and out of gear. There's a power hack saw on the forground, 3 laythes, a drill press and a shaper in the back ground. There'a a really big 4 jaw chuck on the bench.

Judging by the 2 marine engines and the propeller I would say it was about 1910.

Thanks for posting

Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 05:48 pm:

Its curious to see all the different wire and grinder wheels behind the grinder in the right side of the shop in the first photo. Must have been several wheels used for different purposes. Maybe some are buffer wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred B on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 07:18 pm:

i see an early TV screen in first photo. mid- way lh side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 07:20 pm:

Great photo. What a cool period in time. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Bourgeois,Aldergrove BC,Can. on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 07:27 pm:

Fred, I think that's a stove of some kind. Flue pipe above it.
PaulB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 07:38 pm:

I think it is a forge of some kind.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 07:39 pm:

It's a forge, note the anvil is close by.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 07:48 pm:

What a cool picture, a cool shop, and by golly, no OSHA then! And they survived! Imagine that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 08:24 pm:

Wow. Great shop.
That second photo answers so many questions.
That's 2 punch presses in the right foreground yes?
Thank you Herb!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 09:00 pm:

Looks more like a machine/fabrication shop. The forge and anvil are an anachronism in a garage. I love the way those belts are arranged to drive various machines. Is that a pipe threader on the right on the tripod stand?

Alan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Trumpy on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 09:24 pm:

John,

Marine machine shops then and now do a lot of fine sanding and polishing. Then it was probably brass, today it is stainless and aluminum. Brass propeller repair which is ongoing work requires grinding and polishing after braising repairs. Today we use hand grinders and various levels of sandpaper but those were not available then so I would imagine grind wheels in various grits were the method of metal removal.

Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Sunday, April 16, 2017 - 11:29 pm:

You do not see Shapers in most machine shops today. Having machined/ground stock available made this machine a seldom used item. Internal key way's are now mostly broached.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 12:39 am:

My 1928 South Bend has a two speed belt set up. Lots of fun to run. I seen old film of a machine operator changing the step pulley belt speed on the fly with a stick. Love these old machine tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 07:58 pm:

I had an inboard marine motor similar to the one laying on the floor. One cylinder, 2 cycle. Hauled it around for 50 years and finally sold it to a friend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 08:13 pm:

i have worked in old shops for the last 60 years. but the one in the frt center i am not sure what it is. maybe a mill of some kind.pat your south bend is nice mine was made before 1915. no records be fore that charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred B on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:42 am:

i would think just a small belt could power the TV


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred B on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:47 am:

i would think just a small belt could power the TV


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred B on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:49 am:

deleate last post


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 02:16 am:

Fred, from the smokestack on top of the TV I think it runs on kerosene. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 02:03 pm:

Charlie - Pipe threading maybe?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 02:18 pm:

W.F. & John Barnes Co., number 4-1/2 lathe. Originally pedal powered, but that's been removed to run off the line shaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 02:20 pm:

Harold & Charley,

Yes, I believe that's a pipe threader.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 08:45 pm:

Charlie, what's your serial number? Mine's 926 and South Bend told me almost 30 years ago it was sold in June of 1911 to the huge sales agent F. E. Satterlee in Minneapolis and it didn't stray but a hundred miles so far.
wswells.com has a pretty good registry including the older ones.
Pat, that is a beautiful lathe and I love the two speed setup!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred B on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 08:46 pm:

on that TV, maybe its kinda like a gas refrigerator? that tool on the floor stand to the right of the TV appears to be a draw cut power hack saw, i believe Marvel to be most popular, but this one appears to be something else.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 06:47 pm:

duey! my # is 18760 30 years ago i called them they said they had a fire in 1915, they had no records before that????the machine could be a threader as i see square dies.but i think the three legged one to the right is the pipe threader. great pic. thanks . charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Mino, near Porterville on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 09:25 pm:

Charley - This 16" x 10' is number 18972, believed to have been built in 1919. Was used by a local irrigation district to cut transite pipe.

It's all apart now awaiting some cleanup before going back into service. Has a transmission to select forward speeds and reverse. I'd like to rig it back to overhead lineshaft system if I can come up with the appropriate components.

So Bend -1

So Bend -2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 10:10 pm:

Sweet BIG lathe Phil!
Mine has had a Model A transmission hanging on its leg for a long time.
I like that setup and those "modern" guards you guys have. Ya, they're mostly just to keep oil from slinging around on the operator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 12:04 am:

Phil- my 1st real lathe was a 16" SB with the same Western Gear gearbox mounted similar to yours except someone had built a very elegant cone clutch arrangement between the motor and the gearbox so you never had to shut off the motor to stop the spindle.


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