OT- Mustang

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT- Mustang
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 08:34 am:

On April 17, 1964 Ford Motor Company introduced the Ford Mustang at the New York Worlds Fair.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:12 am:

Thanks Dennis.
My dad's new 65 Mustang brings back many memories for me. I learned to drive in 66 in it. He used it to pull our ski boat to the lake.
It was a 289 with a 3 speed on the floor.
I remember lighting them up right in front of my dad. He never scolded me about burning rubber. It was a great car and he was a great dad.
April 17 is also the anniversary of my wife and I first date


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:27 am:

Perspective time warp. The Mustang is now eleven years older than my first T was when I got it. Still doesn't register with me as an "antique" car. $2695 for the basic model - what a deal !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Beatty _Kansas City on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:28 am:

Another great example of the right car at the right time! My first car was a 1964 1/2 convertible and I still have it!

However, according to my calculations based on numbers pulled from Wikipedia, Ford has sold 9,517,370 Mustangs in 52 years of production. (1964 through 2016). Annual sales for the last 10 years have average 97,762 units per year so the Mustang may catch the Model T production total in about another 56 years!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Otto on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:32 am:

I have a 65 in my garage. It was built in March of 65. Almost to the day, 10 years older than me. I grew up in the car and my kids grew up in that car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 11:16 am:

My old man bought a 66 fastback, .... 289/3-speed/dark green metallic
for my mother in 1968 ? It had been purchased by a kid that went to Vietnam
and did not come back alive. I loved that car, but Dad, the perennial master
of turning gold bars into sh!t, took it down to Dick's Cascade Ford in Bellevue
and traded it in on a new brown metallic with wood siding 1971 Pinto wagon.

Nice play, Dad !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 11:41 am:

I was at 3 different Ford dealers on April 17, 1964 looking at the new Mustang. All that I could find were 6s. April 20 I ordered a one with a 289, 4 sp, & 4 barrel car5b. Wish I still had it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 12:39 pm:

Just got back from running errands in it. We bought it for our Daughter to drive to school in. It does take up room better off for Model T's


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 12:49 pm:

I love the V8 sound of an early Mustang with dual exhaust, however I own a 65 with a 200 six. Probably one of the best cars I have had. It's one stock with the exception of a conversion to front disc brakes. It is basic, simple, and reliable, just like a Model T, and the 200 six is bulletproof and plenty powerful for the size and weight of the car. If it had a better cylinder head design it would probably be one of the best engines ever made.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 01:18 pm:

I ordered my Mustang new on St Patrick's Day 1965. I ordered it with the High Performance engine. Funny thing is the dealer tried to talk me out of buying a Hi-PO. It listed for $3,200 and I talked them down to $2,800. I still have this car. It is all original (meaning never been touched), has 26,000 miles on it. I was offered a very high dollar amount for this car and declined the offer. Another funny thing is when they first came out I didn't like them, but it grew on me.

I bought this album the same time I bought this car.








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 04:27 pm:

My sister found this picture for me.

Lake Mead, NV. Summer 1966


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 08:06 pm:

I love my T but a 1967 fastback is my ultimate dream car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 08:14 pm:

I still have a 65 A code car that's black that hasn't been restored that's a clean driver but want to restore it to new condition again. Gotta stop working on my Model A s and T s this winter and get her done. These are great cars and still affordable in stock trim and even hot rodded up. I like them all. I wish I could have bought a new one but I was only 1 year old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dodd on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 09:37 pm:

In 71 I went with my dad to look at a 65 Mustang for my sister for high school graduation. We wound up buying a 65 coupe with power steering and a vinyl top.
I would borrow it when I needed something reliable to drive and eventually when she tired of it I bought it from my folks. A couple of years later I found out why the car had foglights and an emblem that said "GT" on it. Still parked in my garage :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Voss on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 09:40 pm:

Well Seth I have a 67 fastback and a 27 T. But the man who drew the concept sketch that was used for the Mustang is it my T club. I think he is a member of the MTFCA.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 09:49 pm:

In 65 I bought a Studebaker Avanti, boy was I disappointed when I couldn't beat a 271 horse Mustang in a drag race, AND it cost more than $1,000 less. Dave in Bellingham, WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:06 pm:

Unibody Mustangs in the Twin Cities were the ultimate rust magnets due to winter road salt. In my opinion, substantially worse than other cars of that period.

Years ago I looked at a low mileage 1965 Mustang that a little old lady was selling. The exterior looked good and the interior was immaculate. I opened the trunk and the springs were protruding through the rusted-out floor. She was still driving the car and ignored the problem by covering the springs with a rug.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:17 am:

Here is a link to a nice story.

The remarkable story behind the first Mustang ever sold.

http://driving.ca/ford/mustang/auto-news/entertainment/say-hello-to-the-first-mu stang-ever-sold

Best regards, John Page, Australia.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 07:09 am:

Dave, one of the reasons the 271 Hi-Po was so fast was how light they are. I never got beat with mine, stop light to stop light, against all the hot cars of the era. One of the reasons mine has so few miles on it is it was so fast I couldn't keep from driving it fast. I was afraid I would eventually wreck it. If I drive it today, same thing happens, it is a real fun car to drive.

Bill, I ended up with a 66 GT Fastback I bought as a total wreck in 1969. I repaired it and had it until the late 90's. It had the 289 4 barrel engine in it. Driving both cars, the Hi-Po was at least twice as fast. It's hard to believe they were both 289's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 08:27 am:

I just wish I had one! Been in love with the 'Stang ever since they came out, and I was only 10 at the time!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 08:49 am:

Y'all are probably going to scold me for this but here goes....

I was raised by a drag-racer who got his start in the 1950's 1/4 mile tracks. So, everything was a potential race car to him, including the Mustang fastback in the photo below.

This was taken at our house in 1986 (I was 17). The Mustang was an all original car with around 40K miles on it. (but then heck..it was just a 20 year old used car at the time!) My dad gutted it, put a roll cage in it, painted it white, hopped up the 289 and went racing. It was fast for the time and ran 12's in the quarter.

That's my 54 Ford in the garage. I still have it.

And to the right is a '63 Galaxie that I rolled into a ball in an accident that nearly took off my right leg.

Yeah...we were hard on cars, but like I said, these were just used cars that we bought for less than $1,000...sometimes a lot less.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 09:48 am:

That red Mustang makes me think of 1965 when I was a junior in high school.

A senior boy who graduated from school in 1965 was given a red 65 mustang for graduation. He was going to UT in Austin to play football in the fall.

He had left his new Mustang one summer night downtown in the small town we lived in to go to Waco to cruise around town with friends at the local hangouts.

When he got back to pickup his car and go home he discovered the drivers side had been 'keyed'! In other word somebody put a deep scratch the full length of the car about waist high, Boy was he upset! Live and learn I guess!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Duffy on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:10 pm:

Here is my 66 conv, 200 6cyl 3spd. Bone stock, but a fun car


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 12:19 pm:

As kids (around the age of 5-6-7), my best friend and I had a deal with
our mothers to tag along on shopping trips to town. The deal was, they
would drop us off as one of our favorite car dealers and they would pick
us up at a specific time. It was how I learned to tell time, and nor being at
the curb, waiting, would have cancelled any future trips.

My friend loved Mustangs, Shelbys, and Cobras. His young influence
caused his parents to buy a light green metallic notchback in 67 that he
still has. In high school he bought a 67 GT 500 Shelby, and later on he
added a 66 427 Cobra to the mix. BUt it all started at Metke Ford, on the
corner of NE 8th and 108th in Bellevue.

My favorite dealership was BC Hawk Dodge. Seems to me they sold
Plymouth too, but maybe I am just remembering the 69 Daytonas, or maybe
my memory is all mixed up on that ??? I just loved the new Coronet body
in 1966.

Looking back on it, I am quite sure we pestered and annoyed the dealer-
-ship staff, collecting up all the brochures and wanting to sit in all the cars.
I know I would have a pretty good laugh if I was there and little kids like we
were came in, all enthusiastic about cars like that.

I still have my Coronet. 440 Magnum, 4-speed, 3.23 Posi, K-H disc brakes
sway bars. WAY too much power for that car. It has a strong desire to go
sideways if the shifts are hit with too much throttle and only one hand is one
the wheel (the other on the shifter).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 04:29 pm:

Geez Burger, what a trip down memory lane. I think back to the parking lot in high school. All the mid 50's and early 60's Chevys, 442 Oldsmobiles, late 60's GTOs. Not many Dodges but Plymouth was well represented with Coronets and I remember one blue SuperBee. Ford represented by Mustangs and Fairlane 500s. Those were the days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 04:32 pm:

Hmmmm.... I believe the Coronet was a Dodge. So Dodge was well represented.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 04:42 pm:

A bit earlier for me, when I was a kid I lusted after a 54 Studebaker Champion and really liked the 55 and 56 Fords. Mustangs didn't comer out until I was out of High School and my fave the Camaro a few years later. Had 2 Camaros a vanilla 67 (great car) and a 70 SuperSport. When I started thinking about finding a vintage car, the T took me away. With 2 Ts and an old Volvo for my wife (her fave from the early 60's) there is no room for any other toys.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 04:57 pm:

Walt, didn't even think about the Camaro or the FireBirds. Both of those models were big in the late 60s to mid 70s and beyond. And you are correct in that it doesn't get much better than a 67 Camaro. Like you I can't beat owning a couple of Ts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 05:20 pm:

When I came back from Viet Nam in August of 69 I went looking for a 69 Mach 1 but the 70's were already out and I did not like the style of them. I finally found one at a out of town dealer $3100 out the door. Only brand new car I ever bought, wish I had kept it. Got rid of it in the late 70's when gas started getting expensive, almost 75 cents per gallon. Jim

I've been trying to upload a picture but the system is being ornery today. I click on upload and I get nothing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 05:40 pm:

Don,.....you said,....."including the Mustang fastback in the photo below." (???) I'm an old guy, and not that much of a Mustang expert, but I'm pretty sure that's not a fastback,....not that it matters tho' I guess. They're all pretty "collectable" nowadays, right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 06:16 pm:

Harold...it was most definitely a fastback. I remember it well, and made a 12.8 second pass in it at Edinburg Speedway in south Texas.

Here's a photo of a coupe. Notice how the rear window frame is different than the blue car in my photo. (look at the bottom corners of the window frame)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 06:20 pm:

No offense intended Mustang folks but before '67 the Mustang had a half-fast back. (Sorry, I was a Camaro guy.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 10:00 pm:

I read Burger's post at lunch time and been wondering all afternoon why the car dealership ever put up with a couple of kids running around unsupervised in their showroom. Now I think I've got it.

SCENE: The sales manager's office with all sales personnel present.

SALES MANAGER: "Look guys, I know those little rug rats are a pain in the butt. But you guys are just going to have to suck it up. The first time they were in here with their mother, she let slip that the 'ole man was regional purchasing manager for Avis Rent a Car. I'd give the family jewels to have that Avis account. I don't car how many brochures they steal."

(Burger's Mom was no dummy.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome Hoffman, Hays Kansas on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 10:38 pm:

On my bucket list-to round out my 65's I have an F-100 and a Galaxie convertible. The mustang would have to be red because the truck is blue and the Galaxie is white.
Hard to think of them as antiques because I still remember as a freshmen at McPherson College working on a 65 coupe, 6 cly car, Vintage Burgundy with a black interior. This was in 1979 and the car was not even 15 years old. My current daily driver is a 99.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 05:07 am:

It's not uncommon for Model T Owners to also own a classic Mustang. We have several in our Membership base with me being one of them. I have a 1910 & 26 T plus a 66 Convertible Mustang.
Alan from Western Australia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 05:10 am:

When the Mustang first came out, I was a junior in high school. I was hooked! I still like them, but one thing that has always bothered me. Why in the HELL would Ford send them out with four bolt wheels on the six cylinder models? It just never made any sense to me. Why would having to stock two different sets of parts for the same car be smart? Ford has always been (at least back in the '50's through the '70's) known for changing every engine, transmission and drive line parts so they won't interchange for no apparent reason. I don't get it. Just something that I have never understood. :-( :-( Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Ghormley - Covington Ga on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 12:08 pm:

What David said re 4-bolt wheels. I had already sent the following note to my son & daughter:

"I remember the day the mustangs came out. Me and couple buddies went to local Ford dealer to see it on showroom floor. It had a sheet over it for a week before the official reveal at midnight. We went the next day, probably skipped out of a dull class I imagine. Mustang only had 4 lug bolts per wheel. The one the local Ford dealer had was cream color, some local big-shot dude bought it with cash as soon as the sheet came off it. Show off… We thought he should have waited for a red one or something. Who buys a cream color hot rod?"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 12:19 pm:

Maybe Ford was using up their stock of Falcon hubs


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 12:21 pm:

David,

Let me start off by saying I question the same things. I am loyal to no
car mfr., and as a result, am not clouded in my observations that one maker
is the end-all, beat-all and cannot be subject to criticism.

This is my observation of Fords as cars/truck, and the company in general:
Henry started the drive to build cheap cars as his market niche with the Model
T. By 1925 or so, the VERY successful strategy of ALL function and minimal
"form" was losing its hold on the mass consumer, and others in the company
persuaded Henry to consider "styling" as part of the sales strategy. The writing
was on the wall and Henry unhappily allowed this to happen.

BUT ! .... underneath, the strategy of building minimalist vehicles remained,
and by-and-large, through the 60's, most of Ford's cars and trucks were very
basic in design, saving every dine in production cost possible, but putting a
pretty wrapper on the outside to make the product appear "more".

I have owned and restored Fords from 1925 to 1966, along with Packards and
Lincolns and DeSotos. In the larger scheme of things, Fords were cheap cars
and the company purposely made them that way because that was the market
they originally aimed for, and many loyal Ford buyers liked that paradigm.

Now, that is not to say one could not buy a well equipped Ford at times. But
largely, most were not very fancy, did not have over-built drivetrains or brakes
or interiors, and were just a basic car.

I love my TT because it is a very basic conveyance. It is very honest and there
are no airs that it is something fancier than the most basic vehicle that it was built
to be. It was a different time when Henry sold cars for $290 and people did not
care about all the frills. That was Henry's genius. That is my attraction to Model T's.
They represent a different mental place we were as a nation. The base Mustang is
just a very stylized version of Henry's original idea.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Bishop, San Diego on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 03:39 pm:

To try and bring this back around to Model T's. . . . . .when my wife and I married in 1971, I made her sell her 1966 Mustang so we could pay rent and buy groceries ($900!). She has never let me forget that.
At every car show we go to, every time I buy a Model T, I hear about it. 46 years now!
So, this year for her birthday I bought her a new Mustang convertible. We now have 100 years of Ford convertibles in our family. . .my 1917 Model T "convertible" (touring), and her 2017 Mustang convertible! I've tried telling her I have the prototype of her car, but she won't buy it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 03:51 pm:

I think the Mustang was designed and intended to be a six cylinder car based on Falcon parts, but just as they introduced it, Pontiac dropped a big 389 into a Tempest and called it a GTO, and the horsepower race was on. Ford's answer was to beef up the brakes, steering, and axle, and drop in a 260 and later a 289. At least they fit in the limited space, but in '67 they had to break out the shoehorns to fit the 390 FE engines in the GT's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 04:18 pm:

Underneath,the mustang was just a glorified falcon with a longer hood and a shorter trunk, BUT the top of the line mustangs were always intended to be V-8 powered, just like the upscale Falcon "Sprint" trim level was powered by the 260 V-8.
It is amazing how far Ford hit it out of the ballpark with a car that was mostly off-the-shelf parts!

Bob, its nice how you bookended 100 years of automotive design with those two Fords. I would display them at a car show side by side as "His & Hers" and let the folks figure out which is which.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 04:31 pm:

Finally able to get a picture of my 69 Mach posted. I was a lifetime younger then. Jim

mach


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 07:14 pm:

I've had a few other Mustangs. I had a 65 convertible that needed a total restoration. I traded it to a guy that gave me $1000 and a 1920 Touring (that is now my wife's). I later restored the 20, but drove it as it was for a few years before I restored it. Another one I had was a 65 Mustang Coupe V-8 4 barrel 4 speed. I bought it as a package deal when I bought my 66 F-350 tow truck in 1968, from a local Ford dealer. The truck can be seen in the background of one of the pictures of my 65 that I posted. The Coupe had been a total, made up from two cars, cut in half and welded together. They did a nice job piecing it together but messed up the paint work, plus the hood had flown up at one time and bent the rear corners. I fixed the hood, repainted and resold it. Another was 67 Coupe I bought as a total when it was a year old. I repaired that and drove it until 1973. During that time the ex wife totaled it again, and I fixed it again. It had 120,000 miles on it when I sold it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 08:51 pm:

I have owned 65 Mustangs all my life, except for the child raring days, after all the model T's started showing up in the barn the wife thought there should be some 65 mustangs in the barn also. So now there is a 65 fastback 4speed, and the 65 convertible is hanging on the rotisary from floor problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 11:31 am:

Don - Thanks for the explanation and additional photo,....I learned something! ......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 11:35 am:

Don - I should have added,.....I kinda' like Walt's further explanation which will help me remember the difference,......"half-fastback",.......(:^),........harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Koke Twigg-Smith on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 03:04 pm:

My Dad bought a 64 1/2 mustang convertible, 6 cyl, white upholstery, sea foam green for my Mom's 45 th birthday. All she got was a photo and brochure, took awhile to get these to Hawaii! Car lasted about three months when she got it, my dips..t brother ran it off the side of a mountain one night. Totaled it, but was very fortunate to do so by hitting a large tree, which stopped him from plummeting 3-400 feet down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RE Helgeson on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 04:11 pm:

Koke, what kind of car is that in you profile? Nice looking ride!


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