Wood Body TT Truck Bed Question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Wood Body TT Truck Bed Question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 09:41 pm:

I know there were a thousand different ways TT truck bodies were build by people, but maybe someone can comment on what they have seen with regard to the front of the bed where it meets the cab. My bed was pretty shot when I got it, and the remnants were pulled off pretty much right away, I kept the wood for reference, but I don't recall seeing a bulkhead or front of the bed, and I don't see wood for it either in the scraps.
Do other people have TT beds where there is nothing separating the front of the bed and the back of the cab? Or am I just missing some parts?
Thanks in advance for any help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:04 pm:

Zachary, I will be picking up a couple wood beds for TT in a couple weeks. I will get pics if that is any help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 10:04 pm:

My '18 is a wood cab with a wood stake side bed. The bed Is 8' long and 5' wide. It is mounted such that there is about a 1 inch (maybe just a little more) space between the front edge of the bed and the wooden rear surface of the cab. Whether intentional or not, the assembly allows for chassis flex when it's heavily loaded.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Addington on Monday, April 17, 2017 - 11:41 pm:

Zachary here is a picture of mine. I hope it is of some help to you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 01:39 am:

Bulkhead is a word I do not see used enough.
You hit it spot on!
I got nothin'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 - 10:30 pm:

Thank you for your thoughts, I didn't think they would make a bed without a bulkhead but just wanted to check.
Henry, Chassis flex was another question, thanks for addressing that point. Now that the snow is gone, I rummaged through the broken bits of the old bed where I dumped them and I can see some evidence of a bulkhead along the walls, there was no wood present though. I will just mill a little more 1" hemlock, which is what most of the bed will be with the exception of the bars that support the deck, they are oak and ash, I had some ash already in the shop and this will get paint so I see no reason why it would matter if all the wood is the same species.
The bed finally got some attention today, most of the wood is from the property and have been drying for 2-3 years. I jointed and planed the wood to thickness back in February so it has had time to dry a little more/acclimate if it wanted to.
Today the frame rails were cut down to size and secured as well as cross bars. Tomorrow evening will hopefully get the deck laid down. The deck boards are all tongue and groove though my profile is a little different from what was present on the old boards. I am hoping to have a couple hours each night this week, so maybe the bed will be together and ready for paint by Friday night.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 02:02 am:

Zachary, don't be tempted to jam the boards tightly into the tongue and groove. They need to be able to expand and contract with changing moisture conditions. I lay mine using steel yard rule in each joint as I go. A wider gap is better than a narrow one. The wider the boards, the wider the gap should be. A 1/2" drain hole in each of the 4 corners will let rain drain away rather than soak in.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 02:31 am:

Tongue and groove ? Is that typical ? I was under mine for the ongoing
rear end change and they do not look to be T&G and they ARE original to
the factory "Ford Truck" flatbed.

I will look more closely tomorrow, but at a glance, they sure looked like
square-edged dimensional lumber, separated by the bolts that hold the
metal ribs on the deck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 11:31 pm:

Allan,good thinking. The boards are air dried, my guess is 16% which means summer will be pretty unlikely to expand the boards much. I will check moisture content Friday with a meter. The deck boards are pretty much 6 or 7 inches, walls are a bit over 11 inches -one single board per side as the originals were. Surprisingly the originals never cracked due to shrinking/expanding I guess the bolts had enough wiggle room I am hoping the same holds for mine.


Burger, the truck is a Mifflinburg body (as far as I can tell) not Ford but who knows what wood was replaced over the years, I like the idea of the tongue and groove too keep stuff from falling through.
I need to remember to take the camera our with me, there is nothing too special going on but its always good to have a couple pictures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 12:40 am:

On the Ford beds, metal strips, similar to those used on most pickup truck
beds into the 1960's held the wood planks down and kept anything from falling
through (as well as separating the planks for expansion and minimizing rot).

For a truck that will get used, I would not use a tongue and groove. I don't
think it will hold up as well as square planks with rub strips and bolts holding
them apart.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 11:03 pm:

I don't mean to sound argumentative, here what has been said is perfectly correct: wood shrinks/grows roughly ~1/8" for each foot or maybe even less, and wood definitively weathers better if it can get dry again quickly after exposure to water. But.. The floor will not be used too hard; besides being stored inside, there will be an express body with roof over it when done similar to the lower image below. I am just copying what was present when I got the truck whether it was original or not -the floor being replaced lasted at least 50 years unless someone sneaked in and replaced it while it was off the road.





Rate of rot seems to be awful hard to really quantify, the floor of the chicken coop here is 40 years old now, though it did have a 15 year respite from manure. It is red oak and seems to still be quite solid, a trailer made from the same oak lasted about 15 years outside with leaves sawdust and bark on it constantly I would have guessed the chicken coop would have been long gone by this point.
My T trailer is pretty much outside all the time with a tight edge to edge Hemlock floor (with tractor paint) and still looks great and holds water after 5 years of weathering and kids. Though I am good about not letting leaves and stuff collect and hold moisture to the wood.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 11:14 pm:

All answers to the above question are wrong. If you want the correct answer, call me between 10:08am and 10:13am tomorrow and I will guide you through the correct procedure. Except between 10:10 and 10:11am when I'll be busy dusting all my awards and trophies. My knowledge is secret so it can't be disclosed on this forum. Somebody might learn something then I wouldn't feel useful or powerful.

Sound familiar?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Thursday, April 20, 2017 - 11:21 pm:

Here is the new bed thus far. I noticed the tools showing in the image are maybe a bit funny, the block plane is being used to chamfer the edges of each board a bit so they are not sharp. The combination square was for the hinge mortises which I likely did way too carefully compared to what would have been done originally.




The wood on the frame is two layers, the upper is as-per original, but a lower is a spacer inserted to raise the bed a couple inches to clear the Snowmobile tracks in winter.
I continually find myself trying to maintain a line between reconstructing the truck as it came and building it to suit the needs of my family. I have tried to save any old bits that might be useful to undo any modifications I have made. Maybe that is silly given how many undocumented changes may have already occurred.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 03:56 am:

I'll have to look again, but I think the floor of my 8in1 truck bed is tongue and groove, but I'm not positive. Dave.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 06:25 am:

Ill have a look for you in a couple weeks Dave. Zachary, lets have a look at that cab. Following yours as I will be working on wood cab and bed this spring. Looking good.
Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 09:00 pm:

I sent a link to a google drive folder with full size cab pictures to Dallas, if anyone is working on a wood cab I can send the link the link to them too.

Yeah Steven that happens here at times -seems like more lately, but in this case everyone was trying to be helpful but they were feeding me information I knew well and was purposely ignoring, they couldn't know what I was working from/with, I nearly took a picture of one of the rotted boards with T&G to show I wasn't crazy, maybe I still will.

Here are a couple pictures from earlier in the week -I just figured out how to get from my phone to the computer.
The girls were playing in the truck for hours, they would pretend to drive somewhere hop out run around or ride bikes then climb back in to go somewhere else. There has been a steady stream of dump trucks going past that they were getting to honk at them, I hooked up the battery so they could honk back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 09:11 pm:

As an added note to the picture above, and totally off topic. I worry at times that they might damage or break stuff on this vehicle or one of the others when they play, but then I remember that if keep them from loving the vehicles they will never learn/care to fix them either. My father used to say it was cheap education when I broke something in his shop, he put up with all the dull tools, no parking in his own garage, etc... With kids I have come to see that he was right it was cheap, I learned a lot and more importantly developed a love for working with my hands and caring for things that my father cares for. So the $100 calipers for instance were just cheap education and it pays dividends later.

A shot with just the cross members:



And one of the tail gate hinge mortise, like I said last night, way better than the original job:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 12:39 am:

Zachary, very nice truck and I like your attitude also, well done


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