Motor oil

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Motor oil
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Markham on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 06:30 pm:

I know I'm opening a can of worms but I want to hear different views on motor oil,getting g the T out and want to service it I have heard it is not good to use a synthetic blend, so when I went to store a 5 quart jug of blend was $11.89,they only had one brand of non blend at $6.28 per quart brand of course,this really makes you think about what to do


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 06:45 pm:

Google motor oil mftca got About 6,570 results (0.49 seconds)

No point beating this horse to death again but I am sure there will those that will pick up a stick and have a wack. LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 06:57 pm:

Alex, I'll take model T oil for $1000.

With so many different types & weights of oil to use how do I make a decision?

What is 11.89 for five quarts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 07:03 pm:

$2.378/Qt, plus tax and tip! ;) jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 07:11 pm:

Years ago just after I rebuilt the engine on my T, I put some STP with the oil. It made the oil slippery, good for the bearings but not the brakes. I could hardly stop the car. It took several oil changes to get it out of the engine. I now just use 10W30


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 07:18 pm:

What?????
You don't use straight 30 weight oil!
Shame on you!
Everyone knows that 30 weight was used back in the day!
How dare you use something different?


Oh - I use the cheepest 10-30 I can find.
Everything everything else is a waste of money


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve in Tennessee on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 07:33 pm:

I use olive oil when I am using the manifold cooker. the rest of the time I run Rotella.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 07:58 pm:



I'll try as best I can to boil it down to the basics in no particular order:

a.) The cheap motor oil of today is much better than the best of what was available back in the heyday of the Model T Ford.

b.) Some people report that the synthetic-types of oil are too slippery and cause the Model T's clutch to slip excessively.

c.) Some people say that any oil infused with zinc (or any other metallic component) should not be used in the Model T because it may tend to short out the flywheel magneto. _Intuitively, this seems to make sense.

d.) It was recommended to me that the best oil to use in a Model T was straight 30-weight, but I found that this caused the car to creep forward on start-up. _The problem was solved, in my case, by switching to 5W-30. _Depending on availability on the store shelf, I also use 10W-30, which seems to work as well.

e.) There is controversy as to whether detergent or non-detergent oil is best to use in a Model T. _I use the more readily available detergent type, which, to my mind, means that the undesirable stuff (sludge, dirt, carbon, Cocoa-Marsh, etc.) drains out with the old oil every time I change it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 08:23 pm:

In my world the least expensive multiweight oil is just fine. I routinely shop at Costco and rarely darken the door of Wally World so I usually have a couple gallons of Chevron 10 W 40 from Costco around for my oil changes. Works for me. Don't need any octane booster, graphite, zinc, STP or MMO (there I said it, ducking now) in my world.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 08:32 pm:

Steve, when I tried using Olive Oil Popeye came after me with a club! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 08:50 pm:

I have to say that for some reason the notion that Model T's have to have some special type, exotic, super blended, extra special, synthetic master blend still haunts a lot of well meaning folks.

Using a modern 5W or 10W30 that's available at Wal-Mart, Auto-zone or the closest Dollar store (their store brands) is better than Ford ever used in his Model T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 09:32 pm:

My fear is that the detergent oils I've been running in the '19 engine in my crappy Lizzhe for the last 20 years is gonna dislodge some of the gunk left by non-Detergent oils and plug something up... It's gunky. Heck the '23 engine in my '18 is pretty gunky too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 10:02 pm:

OK, the consensus seems to be that ANY oil "today" is far superior to what was available in the Model T era. Very likely this is true, but just because it would be interesting and educational, I'd like to see some factual information that supports the statement. I mean, just how bad was oil "in the day" ?? Has oil today got to be too dad-blamed fancy for a T ?

As an observer at the time, I noted that non-detergent oils were still commonly used well into the '60s. At the time, the "sludge" caused by heat, combustion by-products, condensation et al caused a number of engine ills. Remember "Bardahl" ?? a popular oil additive that provided non-detergent compounds for non-detergent oils similar to those which were being introduced in the top-end detergent oils. Multi-weight oils were in their infancy in the 50's and 60's. Most folks still changed single weight oils according to season.

Many of the oil brands promoted in the 20's were available well into the 60's; Havoline, for example. It was water-clear, and pretty good stuff in a Model T.

Along with everything else automotive, petroleum lubricants made quantum leaps in development and improvement through the 20's. Doubtless, oils available by 1926 were much improved over what had been available when Model T was first introduced.

The past 50 years has seen a lot of changes in the lubricants developed to keep pace with the requirements of engines that are far different from those produced even into the 70's. The synthetic oils spring from lubricants invented to keep the Nazi war machine running in the face of petroleum shortages. STP is one such; latter-day synthetics seem to be geared to the peculiarities of the latest modern engines. Multi-weight oils have developed a useful range that is downright confusing if one steps outside the directives stated in an owner's manual.

A model T's need for oil is pretty simple. Likely, the big problem for today's Model T driver is to use an oil that isn't "too good" in some way or another - fine for your 2017 computerized buggy, but perhaps lacking in some capacity for a simple Model T ?

50+ years ago, I leaked and burned Double Eagle "re-refined" 30wt oil in my Model T. It sold for 30 cents a quart . . . it was a little cloudy, but sure seemed adequate for me and my Lizzie. At the time, who knew (or cared) how "ecologically enlightened" that was ??

Right now, I've got Shell Rotella 15w 30 in my T, I've read on these boards that it used to be "the stuff", but "they" have gone and changed it, and it's not what it used to be. I have noticed that at operating temperature it seems mighty "watery" to me, compared to memories of Double Eagle . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 10:11 pm:

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG103.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 10:24 pm:

Just want to mention that synthetic blend is not 59 per cent synthetic oil. It is more like 10 percent synthetic..
A body waste of money.
I have heard that synthetic blend is now illegal in most of Europe because folks thought it was half synthetic.
When I see anything 19/40 or thinner on sale I buy a few gallons,
My first choice would be 5/30.
(5W-30).
If it will run down the oiler tube it should do the job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 11:12 pm:

I use synthetic 20w50. This was recommended to me by a T and A engine builder in Los Angeles. Before I was using 10w30 and 10w40.
Yes most common synthetics will make the clutch slip. So you need something designed for wet clutches. I have used Amsoil 20w50 for classic cars and is designed for wet clutches, but a bit pricy. However it is extended service (don't have to change as frequently). Next best to look at in syntec. is motorcycle oil. My last change was to Walmart's 20w50 full synthetic for motorcycles and is designed for wet clutches.
Another interesting thing about synthetics is they don't get thick in cold weather or thin out in hot. I started my car several times this winter and it turned over with no noticeable feeling of thickening. It also splashes just as well as any 10/40,10/30, or 5/30.
Bottom line is you can use any modern detergent oil that you use in your modern car and it's still better than anything they had back in the day. Anything you find with a high zinc content isn't a bad idea.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, April 21, 2017 - 11:12 pm:

Anywhere you already have leaks when using conventional motor oil may be be worse with synthetic blend or or full synthetic and you may experience new leaks in other areas. (Synthetic oil molecules are more uniform in size than conventional oil molecules.)

$11.89 for five quarts is very inexpensive so you can try the synthetic blend if you wish - it won't harm anything. If it causes problems (leaks), you can always go back to conventional.


Otherwise, if there is an auto parts store or Walmart near you, get house brand conventional 10W30 or 5W30.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 09:21 pm:

Eric, that maybe true about Synthetics when they first came out. I've been on synthetic 20/50 for over two years now and have NOT had any extra or excessive oil leaking on my engine. My engine was rebuilt over 10 years ago and has had good modern oil in it and have had no issues when switching to synthetic. Now an engine that was rebuilt 30/40 years ago maybe, but should not have issues if rebuilt in the last 10 years. JMHO


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 09:36 pm:

Castrol classic 20 or 30


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 09:39 pm:

http://www.autoserviceprofessional.com/article/91845/engine-oil-conventional-syn thetic-or-semi-synthetic-blend-whats-the-correct


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 10:53 pm:

George - Thanks for the posting. The very last paragraph tends to verify what Erik Johnson said about leaking with synthetic oils,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevin Gough on Sunday, April 23, 2017 - 04:11 am:

I have found that no matter what brand or viscosity of oil I use, it always ends up black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brad Marble on Sunday, April 23, 2017 - 08:27 am:

John: When I rebuilt my model T engine about thirty years ago,I wrote to three major oil companies, described my engine and asked them what they would recommend. Without exception.,they all recommended a good grade of high detergent multi-weight oil,the same as you would use in your modern car. I can't speak for synthetic, it is to expensive for me. In over 25000 miles I have no oil related failures. Notice I qualified my statement to only oil related issues. Brad from N.H.


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