Does a 26 Roadster use the Transmission Mount wood block

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Does a 26 Roadster use the Transmission Mount wood block
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Blair on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 08:34 pm:

My 1926 Roadster does not have the wood block but does have the 2 straps at the top mounting bolts. I was reading somewhere here that they started using them on the later model but was not sure if it needed the wood blocks and the straps or if the straps took place of the blocks.
Let me know what you think. Should I make a couple blocks and put in there or are the straps enough?

my picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 08:41 pm:

The blocks help to keep the frame from sagging (which is a common problem with 26-7 T's)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Blair on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 08:54 pm:

OK would anyone know the dimensions of that block. I have a hard time searching for things on here but seen it not too long ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 09:16 pm:

Gerald, here you go.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/77802.html?1231642572


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 09:22 pm:

Or if you don't feel like making them, these work quite well.

https://www.modeltford.com/item/3083.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 09:30 pm:

I put them on my 26 rpu but didn't put them on my 26 coupe. If it helps I guess it's worth doing but I have heard yes and no on the forum as to if they help. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 10:14 pm:

Your car uses the new style square wood blocks. Way easier to use than the earlier style.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James M. Riedy, Sandusky, Ohio on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 11:15 pm:

Gerald, You could more than likely find them at Gaslight Auto Parts right there in Urbana. Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Blair on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 06:31 am:

Looks like them might have them. I have a list and was stopping up there soon anyway. They are always helpful.
Thanks
Gerald


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rolf Oehman Oslo Norway on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 01:11 pm:

Les, just wondering.Why is the 1926-27 frames more prone to sagging ? The encyclopedia says quote "In early calendar 1926 heavier steel was used for increased strength. A letter to chassis suppliers, dated February 28, 1926, specified the metal to be the same as the truck chassis (Type L steel, .180-.200 inches thick)". By the way my roadster frame is sagging a bit I think. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 03:36 pm:

Post by Trent gives insight to heavier frame, as bodies got heavier.

Trent Boggess on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 10:35 am:
The reason the engine block to frame straps were added was to reduce crankcase arm breakage. According to Walter Fishleigh's papers (BFRC Acc. 94), the Model T had a problem with crank case arm breakage because of the stresses put on the arms by the pressed steel running board arms. This was not a problem on the TT trucks because the used a much different design of running board arms that did not stress the crankcase arms. The Ford engineers found that by adding the engine to frame straps, they could pretty much clear up the crankcase arm breakage problem.

My October 1926 coupe did not come with the straps, but after reading about why the engineers added the straps, I have since added them to my car, even though they are not technically correct.

In the spring of 1926 the engineers found that the heavier bodies on the improved cars was causing a frame sag problem. The way they cured that problem was by going to a heavier gage steel on the frame side rails. Late '26 and 1927 Model T frame side rails are substantially thicker than post-2500 side rails.

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess


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