Wheelbarrow tow photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Wheelbarrow tow photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 05:22 am:

I read a post yesterday where someone wanted a link to this old pic. I had the pic so here it is.....Gary


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 06:17 am:

Thank you Gary H! That is the one. I laugh, and marvel, every time I see it. People were different in those days. They had a tenacious knack to just get in and get it done using whatever materials or tools were at hand.
Again, Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 08:45 am:

I like this picture... five guys to get her done... sure glad they invented tow trucks...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 08:57 am:

Who said you couldn't tow a T??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 09:35 am:

That is the one. It is nice to see it again. The top boot and luggage rack are fun on the toe car too.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 11:02 am:

This is all very strange. The wheelbarrow isn't in a position to lever the weight of the car. The axle would have to be centered over its wheel to carry the weight, which I doubt the wood barrow would support. If they are just trying to lever it under, the man pushing it would have to be forcing the handles down. His arms look relaxed as if he's pushing the wheelbarrow with no resistance. ?!? And the guy pushing on the top bows ?? What for ? The impression is that he's either lifting the right rear wheel somehow, or balancing the car. Meanwhile the left rear wheel is on the ground. Whatever is going on here, I really doubt the car was towed to that shop balanced on a wheelbarrow, but it makes for a fun story !! Theories, anyone ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 11:46 am:

SOME PEOPLE WOULD GRIPE IF THEY WERE HUNG WITH A NEW ROPE.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Eastwood on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 11:58 am:

That is a very early T. it has the early rear fender brackets, the early "no bill" front fenders & what looks like running boards with the brass trim, which ties in with the early fenders. Looks like three tier side lamps too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 11:59 am:

rich!! everything is right. there is daylight under the left wheel. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 12:32 pm:

I find it believable. There appears to be just slight weight on the wheelbarrow handles.
What I like right now is the hat wedged between the top bows.
Wouldn't these guys have been fun to know?
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 12:37 pm:

Rich,
Seeing is believing....The wheelbarrow has a steel wheel and not made in China. I love it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darryl Bobzin on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 02:09 pm:

All I know is they towed a model T and didn't kill the transmission. Job well done!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 04:46 pm:

Richard,

Hat must belong to the wheelbarrow man. He is the only one around the cars without a hat. Probably kept knocking it off on the top as he followed the tow.

Great picture,

Ken in Texas

(Message edited by drkbp on April 29, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

Richard G. No gripe, just pondering. Charley, I puzzled over that, the near side wheel sure could be off the ground, no shadow. Rich, I'm coming around. Makes sense the two either side are balancing the car on the barrow ? OK, now we know what to do if something locks up. Finding a decent wheelbarrow these days will be a problem though!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 06:34 pm:

Richard G. No gripe, just pondering. Charley, I puzzled over that, the near side wheel sure could be off the ground, no shadow. Rich, I'm coming around. Makes sense the two either side are balancing the car on the barrow ? OK, now we know what to do if something locks up. Finding a decent wheelbarrow these days will be a problem though!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 06:36 pm:

I wonder where the speedometer is in the tow car?

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 06:54 pm:

I am not sure what exactly they are doing but like someone said people did what they had to do in those days. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Sunday, April 30, 2017 - 03:58 am:

Slightly enhanced


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 11:03 pm:

Not a Michigan plate. Not far from Wisconsin though.

Maybe using wheel borrow to get right rear wheel off ground to let it rotate freely while left wheel stays on ground while moving car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 07:19 am:

if so the two men would not need to balance the car.the left wheel is not on the ground. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 07:53 am:

Here's my question -- what would it have taken to snap this as an impromptu photo in 1910? You're not going to jump out and do it with your iPhone. Was a Brownie capable of producing a photo of this quality? In many photos of this era, when the people or object are moving the least little bit, they're blurry. Between the quality, the framing, all that stuff, I'd have to think at the very least it was staged when they got back, if not entirely as a promotional for that shop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 08:24 am:

There are two interesting bits in this write-up on historical buildings in Iron Mountain, Michigan:

http://www.dcl-lib.org/images/files/Genealogy/remearpt2(1).pdf

Page 32 indicates a repair shop with an era description fitting the one shown in the wheelbarrow photo at 100 West B Street. Even without peeling away the vinyl siding it is very easy to see how it could be the same building. You can even see the peak of the roof extending above the facade. The photo also mentions the 1915 date, which seems late for the era photo, but sometimes these things get incorrectly attributed and it carries along with it.

Pages 129 and 130 are later interior shots of an automobile and cycle repair shop at 109 East Brown Street. That's interesting since the shop in the era photo advertised both autos and bicycles at that time.

Maybe somebody with a better computer can do some cruising around on Goggle Street View and post a screenshot. My coal fired machine has a hard time with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 08:58 am:

Thanks for finding that Walter. It is a great collection of photos and information. It makes sense that this photo could have been staged for the Auto Garage's publicity. I was convinced they just captured the moment.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 09:06 am:

Regardless of the details of the circumstances behind it, it's a great photo no matter how it came about.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 10:20 am:

"Was a Brownie capable of producing a photo of this quality?"
No. The Brownie and other cheap box cameras are fixed focus. That's why if you get too close to the subject when shooting a picture with one it will be blurry.


Mom took this picture of me with a box camera. Notice how the window is in sharp focus, but the non-adjustable lens wasn't able to focus on the closer subject.

The Iron Mountain photo was taken by a large format camera. That's apparent due to the short depth of field. The nearest car and people are in sharp focus, and the farther from the camera things are the more blurred they are. Depth of field can be increased or decreased by adjusting the aperture and the shutter speed. To maximize depth of field, you have to use the smallest aperture, which requires a slower shutter speed to let sufficient light into the camera. With this slower shutter speed any movement will be blurred. On the other hand, to shoot a moving subject you want a fast shutter speed to stop the action. This requires a wider aperture to let sufficient light into the camera, reducing depth of field.

This photo, with its relatively short depth of field, was taken with a fast enough shutter speed to stop movement, and therefore a wide aperture producing the short depth of field. It could have been a static pose, or the people may have been moving. The picture doesn't tell us that.

The picture was copied from a book. If we could see a good print from the original negative I expect it would show more detail.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 10:49 am:

Steve,

The truth is your Mother was trying to take a picture of the window. Not you, and you strolled in the picture in your walker! :-):-)
She just never had the heart to tell you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 11:57 am:

Any chance you could email me a copy of this picture full size?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 12:31 pm:

Why would you want a baby picture of Steve?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 12:36 pm:

Steve do you need a group session to help you with your troubled past? Maybe Joe Biden and Hillery can help you out. Scott


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