Old Photo - Buttermilk Junction

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Old Photo - Buttermilk Junction
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 12:49 pm:

Identified as from April, 1937
Buttermilk Junction, Martin County, IN


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 12:57 pm:

Wow, what a neat picture. Love the chickens running around, the buggy and especially the visible pump! Even the model As. Looks pretty depressed. Bet they lived either next door or in the back of the store. Or should I say the sides!
Petticoat Junction it surely aint!! :-)
Thanks for posting Marv. How's the shoulder doing?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 01:12 pm:

Tim, 'maybe' next month. Meanwhile, not encountering too many wrenches, just to be sleep deprived. Gives me an opportunity to practice not being overly cantankerous. My Bride is very patient and understanding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 01:20 pm:

Suspect the sedan is earlier than an 'A'. (With 10 wood-spoke wheels.) Any suspicions?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 01:47 pm:

28-29 mod a s. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 05:59 pm:

Car on the left is a '28-29 Ford A Tudor, the one on the right is a '29 Ford A Sport Coupe. Wagon in the center might be a Studebaker! Looks like the center of the depression, about 1935 or so.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Max L. Christenson on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 06:31 pm:

With all of those late model non-Model T cars, it just too modern for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 07:08 pm:

No wonder I don't like buttermilk look where it's made!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 07:10 pm:

I would love to live there today. I think Iam seeing a storm door on the left. It also looks like the walk up to the door. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Woolf on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 08:35 pm:

I believe the Model A Sedan is a '29 based on the taillight. It has the later style taillight that mounted to the fender rather than the earlier '28 style drum taillight that mounted to the body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Thomas on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 09:03 pm:

1937 - just past the economic low point, mid depression. The place looks beat and run down, like a lot of places did about then. Quite a contrast to the prosperous '60's I experienced as a kid. Some places recovered slowly, or never from the beat down of the '30's. I wonder what this place looks like now?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 09:19 pm:

What a great picture. Times were tough in those days but I love the cars and the pump. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 09:35 pm:

The sedan is a 1930 Model A Ford. Notice very carefully that the splash apron is split where the fender and running board meet. The front part of the splash apron is part of the front fender. The rear part is part of the running board. This was done only on the 1930. The other years had a separate splash apron which went all the way across and was separate from the running board.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 10:00 pm:

As I look thru the side window of the sedan I think Iam seeing a pickup further back. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 10:17 pm:

not 1930 ! small hub cap 21" wheels, door piller, hood is smaller, the line on the splash apron is just dirt. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 10:53 pm:

Looks as bad as it tastes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, May 01, 2017 - 11:00 pm:

Funny that people see this as "beat down", as opposed to "pleasantly organic"
and inviting. Little stores like this were rapidly disappearing around the area I
grew up when I was a kid. I was enamored by their "old" and "cool" from the
start and questioned the mainstream thinking that they were old, dirty, and icky.
I loved the reach-in water-swirling cooler that held bottled sodas, the creaking
wood floors, the gas pumps at the curb, chairs clustered along the boardwalk
porch, ... these places were nothing but wonderful to me. Very much in the same
way old TT farm trucks going down dirt back roads are. :-)

Of course, bright LED lighting and vinyl siding are MUCH better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 12:55 am:

Sorry Norman, you must be looking at a shadow on the splash apron, as the cowl and hood are definitely the '28-29 style. Also the belt molding is flat, not rounded as in the 30-31 style.
Dan, good point about the taillight, although that change did occur mid-28.
I place the sport coupe as '29 due to the landau Irons, in 28 this model was usually a "business Coupe without the irons (and early on, had oval window in the top).
Erik, the '60s I remember were the late ones, and at least in Dunsmuir, it wasn't a prosperous time. Of course, two things hit Dunsmuir at the same time; The Railroad shut down the round house and backshops and Hwy 99 bypassed town (and destroyed many neighborhoods) becoming I-5. This happened because a run-a-way truck rolled through town killing someone, so we were chosen for one of the first sections built of I-5 Freeway in Northern California. Folks were used to driving through the towns along the road and bought gas and food when they did, but Dunsmuir was completely bypassed, so now they stopped in Mt. Shasta. This wasn't corrected until all the towns were bypassed and folks got used to "pulling off the road" to find gas, food & lodging.
Burger, wow, you brought back memories. There was a little market in Dunsmuir that we called "Rooms Market" because they had a neon sign advertising "Rooms" "Market" Little place with a front porch, much like what you describe. Getting the soda out helped cool you off too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 10:37 am:

Few things enhance a town like a good freeway.

When I was 4 years old, my family moved from S.F. to the swamps of
Seattle. Mom took the rest of the kids on the train, and for whatever reasons,
Dad took me and the dog in the old copper and cream 57 Chevy station
wagon north on old 99. Much of that trip is a blur, but two California stops
stand out strongly, .... a gas stop in Arbuckle, where we sat in the shade
of the gas station overhang, sipped on sodas, and soaked up the heavy
scent of eucalyptus. I remember the sun shining through the racks of oil
bottles by the pumps. A northbound train went by, right behind the station.
I was fascinated by all the different types of cars, the different colors, and
all the different road names on them. Hey, .... I was FOUR, OK ? :-)

That night we stopped in Dunsmuir and got a motel room. I remember
leaving the dog in the car and walking down the main drag to a restaurant
for dinner, and walking back. I can still remember what I had for dinner.

For whatever reason, the California part of that trip struck me as something
magical. Like I was seeing something I would never see again. I was right.
Next time through it was all freeway and the town-to-town hops through sleepy
backwater places was turned into a boring drive between commercial strips.

I have almost no recollection of the trip beyond the Siskiyou Mountains.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 11:38 am:

Burger,

I don't know how old you are so I don't know in what year you were four, but I too remember that same California. My family often made trips from our home in San Jose north on 99 to Redding, then east on 299 to 89 and up to McArthur State Park/Burney Falls. We'd camp there for a week or 10 days. Fishing and watching chipmunks were the major pastimes.

I do feel badly for you. Making that long trip in a copper and cream '57 Chevy station wagon must have been brutal. We were much more fortunate. We had a brown and cream '57 Ford station wagon. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 11:54 am:

I dont remember the 57 wagons having plugs for Ipods or flipdown tv screens to watch movies or play video games! What ever did you do to pass the time ? Look out the window???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 12:14 pm:

We counted red cars, out of state license plates, fought with my brother, peed in a glass jar and generally had a great time.

There were no electronics. The car did have an AM radio, but it wasn't of much use on long road trips. By the time you found a station you liked you would travel out of its range. We would have laughed at the idea of a phone in the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 12:43 pm:

What year was the freeway built through Dunsmuir ? We made
that trip in the spring/summer of 1966.

What to do on a long road trip ? Never understood that question
(and it seems to be so commonly referenced !) As mentioned many
times before, I took an interest in those sparkly glass things up on
telephone poles before we moved to Washington. Another strong
memory of that trip was looking out the window at the 1000 miles
of lines and wires that followed the highways and railroad tracks
along our route. The hypnotic rise and fall of the wire as it danced
between the poles, the sparkling glass of many colors, the many shapes.

And it wasn't just the pole lines. It was side roads, railroad tracks,
distant mountains, the cliffs the road clung to, the valleys we drove,
the fences and barns and fields full of cows, the occasional deer. I
still get lost in that ambiance of the surroundings as I travel through
them. As kids, Widdo Bwudder and I were always glued to the windows.
It was a bad trip is we could not sit by the glass.

My own kids were more typical and fought and argued and asked
80,000 times where we were, even on the road trips they had taken
twice that many times before and should have known every fence, barn,
ravine, and crossroad along the way.

People laugh and say "Wassamatta with you ? You are so "different" !"

I roll my eyes with disdain and think to myself "How can you people
all be so boring ?"

I guess the world boils down to two types of people: those who like
freeways and those who hate them.

Give me the long and winding road to nowhere, please. :-)







Can't you just smell the fields, the sagebrush, the trees, when you see
photos like these ?

=========================


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Tuesday, May 02, 2017 - 01:43 pm:

I've always like driving through the forests but wheat fields and sage brush never did much for me as a kid. Any and all of them are far better now with 2 lane roads rather than any scenery on the interstate. Interstate travel may be more efficient but not near as many smiles per mile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 02:18 am:

Interesting ... I grew up in Bellevue/Kirkland/Redmond and came to find the
dense undergrowth type forest/s of the west/wet side clautrophobia-inducing.
Our summer camping trips to the more open forests of the east side really
turned my crank. That, and the lack of everything always being damp or wet.
(hard on old metal and other things I like).

I recall thinking the Scablands sage brush country to be terribly ugly, attaching
a "negative" of dying of thirst, as portrayed in old westerns. But after 30 years
in the swamps, I bailed out and have come to love putzing about the lonely back
country of the Scablands. Montana is heavenly for wide-open Model T country
too. If the winters weren't so harsh and I had strong business prospects, I'd be
living over there ! Spokane is a good balance. :-)

Yes, interstate driving is even less pleasurable than drinking a big bowl of urine.
If "efficiency" is determined on a basis of reduced time to destination arrival, then
I guess it has merits in the same way that dark and grey overcast skies are "efficient"
in bringing on suicidal urges.
If "efficient" is determined on a basis of pleasurable driving and interactive
experience with the places one travels through, the interstate is in serious negative
territory. A mind-numbing hell hole of grey and stunt drivers in the urban areas
and a sell-out, TV-like version of back road driving in the countryside.

Speaking of the wet side, is the old (and cool) Stillwater store still there ? ... or
have the Microsofters bought the property and built an exclusive gym there with
valet parking ?


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