Huckster vs. Depot Hack vs. Shooting Brake

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Huckster vs. Depot Hack vs. Shooting Brake
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 10:55 am:

To my unseasoned eye, they all look the same, but I'm sure there are subtle differences. Can someone enlighten us by showing a photo example of each wood body style? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 11:20 am:

A Huckster is a person who claims there's any difference between a Depot Hack and a Shooting Brake, other than they are typically found on opposite sides of the Atlantic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 11:28 am:

Shooting brake


Depot hack


Huckster


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 11:37 am:

A Huckster would not have the rear side doors or seats for passengers. The sides would be open so goods or wares could be displayed for customers to look at. A Depot Hack would have extra seats and doors to haul passengers to the hotel ether with the seats being along the sides or crosswise, a Shooting Brake would be configured much the same only used to haul people to the hunt. A Hackney is ether a horse or wagon/carriage used for hire also a part of London. Now put Station or Estate Wagon in the mix. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 06:02 pm:

A shooting brake typically has the seats running either side of the car, whereas a depot hack has them oriented across the car as is usual.

You can just see the tops of the backrests in my shooting brake photo that Gary posted.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 06:09 pm:

Here's a shot of some shooters in my brake at a gathering of black powder enthusiasts.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 10:32 pm:

Shooting brake ? What is the origin of that name ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 01:18 am:

Burger,......British I believe. Also, I believe somewhat synonymous with the term "estate wagon". To me, smacks of $$$ "back in the day"! You know,....the fox hunt, "tally ho" and all that! Best I can do Burger, and,....I have to say, .....pretty much conjecture on my part,.....harold

Oh, and Mark,....I believe the term "station wagon" came into being when Henry realized that his "T" and "TT" chassis were becoming so popular for utilization for custom built "depot hacks" that he decided that Ford had better start building one, and instead of "depot hack" (as in train depot), the term "staton wagon (as in railroad station) came into being.

(....possibly a bit more conjecture, but anyway, that's my understanding)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 02:22 am:

Tally ho and all, ....

Shooting Brake ? That basically means "Ejaculating stopping device"

I fail to grasp how that ever came to mean a body style of vehicle.

I must be missing something ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 05:17 am:

During the '10s, '20s, and '30s, throughout the British Empire, many high end cars had very expensive custom body versions similar to these. And they were usually called a "shooting brake". I have seen several Rolls Royce shooting brakes over the years. As I recall from the many years ago when I actually was a member of the Classic Car Club of America, some of them are even accepted even though any "commercial" vehicle regardless of chassis manufacturer was expressly forbidden to be accepted by the CCCA. Shooting brakes were a gray area in the club that a lot of people were unhappy about on both sides of the acceptance issue.

It is just a matter of linguistics. English, a people separated by a common language.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 12:19 pm:

Shooting Brake is a term carried over from the horse and carriage times in europe.
A shooting brake or -break is a carriage with the benches lengthwise, designed to carry groups of people on outdoor activities, an important function was to carry the beaters to the hunt, the huntsmen of course had the means to own their own transport. In holland such a carriage is known as a "Brik", meaning an open carriage with lengthwise benches.Those good old days of the class system ;-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 12:23 pm:

Burger maybe it is something like a Mobile Duck Blind?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 02:10 pm:

The Huckster, a Depot Hack, a Shooting Brake..... a jitney


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 06:39 pm:

I would be curious to know what the current status is with the CCCA on some of these vehicles. They were very strict about that NO commercial vehicles allowed. There is not a lot of difference between an estate wagon or shooting brake that was custom built for the master of the estate, and his personal use which would include carrying personal friends and guests out and about, or on hunts for sport. And the very similar vehicles built for use on commercial or club estates, hunting, transporting of supplies etc. Vehicles of this sort were usually designed for multiple uses, and of course, any phaeton or roadster (or coupe) could also be used to transport supplies, or paying guests, at any time. Things like an ambulance or a hearse are expressly forbidden in CCCA rules (at least used to be). Sometimes those lines become very difficult to draw.
I recall seeing a couple "shooting Brakes" at a car show many years ago (more than 40). They were interesting, and very nice to look at. I also recall hearing about one that was not allowed because its pedigree "was not quite good enough". Yeah, there are those reasons some of us on this website do not like the car show crowd.
It was actually kind of strange seeing a nice Rolls Royce of appropriate vintage that was NOT allowed into the CCCA.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 07:08 pm:

Some perhaps useless info: the depot hack pictured above is of my dad's depot hack taken some years ago at a MTFCI tour in So. Dakota. It is a 1970's Syverson reproduction Depot hack body on a 1919 chassis.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dysart - SoCal on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 07:16 pm:

Speaking of Jitneys. Pierre Dupuy's Jitney is a long time favorite at the HCCSC Holiday Motor Excursions. This image is from the last year's event, which was slightly more damp than usual...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 07:23 pm:

Scott C, Thanks for the information! It is always nice to know the background of the cars we enjoy and see pictures of. While I will say, that an original wood after-market body is preferable to a modern remake. The fact is, their survival rate is very low, and therefore true originals (either preserved or restored) today are quite rare (let us not argue the definition of "restored" here and now).
The fact also is, that Syverson built some of the best and nicest ever remake bodies of this type.


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