12 rivet rear end cracks

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: 12 rivet rear end cracks
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Barlow on Friday, May 12, 2017 - 09:21 pm:

Is there a preferred method, or any method for welding or Brazing cracks through the rivet holes on a 12 rivet rear end housing?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Barlow on Friday, May 12, 2017 - 09:29 pm:


At first I thought it was just on one side but after I cleaned it the other side showed up. Not looking good. The other side is fine. Any ideas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Barlow on Friday, May 12, 2017 - 09:29 pm:


At first I thought it was just on one side but after I cleaned it the other side showed up. Not looking good. The other side is fine. Any ideas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, May 12, 2017 - 10:47 pm:

I have seen these all brazed up on the inside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, May 12, 2017 - 11:33 pm:

Mark, when I found the diff for my 1912 Haighs chocolate van, there were two crescent shaped re-inforcements riveted to the inside of the housings, with rivets spaced in between the existing Ford fitted ones. These were there to repair cracks just like yours.

Once I had removed the re-inforcements, I took out all the rivets and had the housing and centre casting hot tanked to clean them right out. This revealed further cracks so the only option was to have them welded professionally.

This welding warped the casting so I made a
spiggot so that the castings could be re-machined to true them up. The spiggot was a neat fit in the bearing sleeve hole, allowing the outside surface where the axle tube fitted the casting to be trued. The spiggot was then reversed in the casting and the mating surface around the centre was trued.

I assembled the tubes and cast centres using Loktite red flexible flange sealant and 1/4" nuts and bolts. The bolt heads were turned down to replicate the rivet heads, the inside end slotted so that they could be held with a narrow screwdriver while Loktited nuts were run up.

That was 22 years ago, and still it has not leaked or required any attention.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Barlow on Friday, May 12, 2017 - 11:48 pm:

Thank you for the reply,s I was getting very concerned the one side might not be repairable. It sounds like I might be saveable


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 03:17 am:

Mark, Dennis Oley should be able to fix them for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 07:31 am:

A & A Welding in Sun Valley do very nice welding of cast iron. They are a small hole in the wall place, but they do it right and they have very rare engines and other cast iron parts being welded in there for high end restoration shops.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 08:40 am:

Wonder just how many others are like that out there!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 09:47 am:

Over many years i have had good luck welding cast with Nickle welding rod.All cast is not the same but i weld about 3/8"s of a inch and lightly peen with a chipping hammer,wait a couple of minutes and repeat.Nickle rod is very expensive and 3/32"s usually sold a few sticks at a time.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 11:40 am:

Just FYI- these housings are NOT cast iron, they are malleable or nodular iron. The difference is the graphite in the structure is in the form of nodules rather than flakes. This difference is what keeps the housings (and differential carrier) from being brittle. Fortunately, this makes the housings much easier to weld, and machineable nickel rod welds it very nicely without the inherent cracking problems found with cast iron.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, May 14, 2017 - 04:16 am:

It's been several years since I've been very active in the welding trade, but back in the '70's/'90's there were several companies that offered many different specialty welding rods. Most all were offshoots of the different space age company's back then. There were some VERY good products developed for welding different types of cast iron. Most, but not all, were based on nickel. I have used some of them very successfully to weld dirty/oil soaked castings, steel to cast iron, different iron base metals, etc. Some of them were rated up to 30,000 psi tensile strength as I recall. They were expensive, but worked very well. There may be some better choices out there now, or not, I don't know. Point is, do some research, I know there is at least one solution, probably several more. As a rule of thumb, the better a casting will cut (or not) with a torch, the better it will weld. Dan is correct, the malleable and nodular irons are MUCH easier to weld. No matter what you use, the cleaner the better, iron is notorious for soaking up oil and not wanting to let it go. :-( I have found that gouging out a groove with gouging rod works much better than grinding, it helps burn out oil and leaves a cleaner surface to weld. Grinding will often imbed some of the impureties, maybe even adding some from the grinding wheel. If a casting is really dirty, I have had to weld it, which will have bubbles in the weld, and then gouge it out again and reweld it. Probably a lot more info than what you want. :-) :-) JMHO Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, May 14, 2017 - 04:30 am:

One thing I forgot to add. Brazing is a very good way to repair many types of cast iron. The only thing that I don't like about it is, cast iron as well as steel, soaks up bronze almost like oil, meaning that if it doesn't work out, it is VERY hard to remove the bronze. Arc welding does NOT like bronze! :-( :-( Again, JMHO. Dave


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