Crankcase oil lubrication question

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Crankcase oil lubrication question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 11:40 am:

So, after my engine toasted by a combination of water freeze and apparent oil starvation, I'm rebuilding it ... and doing some research on what might have happend oil-wise, as I do check my oil often, and all appeared well.

I got a couple old books regarding the T .. one was a CD of a scanned 'The Model T Ford Car' (Page')... page 95 & 96 talks about how lubrication is obtaind, and procedure (at that time, anyway) to change the oil. His 'rule was to add 1 quart of oil per 5 gallons of gasoline! ... then proceed to open the upper oil petcock until the oil ceased to drain. Wow ... that would be a lot of oil. As I think the print date was 1917 ... I suppose the situation might be a little different than a 1924 model, but essentially, thy are the same engine, yes?

I see now how the oil gets from the internal return pipe to the crankcase via the timing cover. As my return pipe was damaged, with almost a 1/2' (poorly covered) gash, that may have been part of it, but if anything, the oil would have leaked out and still be captured in the oil pan .... and would have starved the timing gear area. That wasn't the case. More likely the return tube(s) (I have an external one, as well) were plugged. I keep forgetting to actually run a wire through to see what/if anything might be in them.

The other thing that came to mind that the suggestion was to drain the oil every 500 miles, and thoroughly flush the crankcase with gasoline or kerosene, then refill with fresh oil. Is this ever really a good idea? Even modern oil change facilities sometimes tout a 'flush your oil' process, but really consider that to be an unnecessary process, and something for them to just make money on.

As to the return tubes ... any thoughts on running larger than normal tube for these returns? Yeah ... the inside one would be a bit problematic, but nothing a little soldering couldn't fix.....

Thoughts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 03:48 pm:

You can get replacement inside oil lines with the large funnel. If some book recommended "to add 1 quart of oil per 5 gallons of gasoline" they were probably attempting to be well on the safe side of a leaky or worn engine. If your engine is a real "gusher" you might want to follow that advice. No need to flush an engine if you use detergent oil. As far as the change rule: 500 miles would seem to be reasonable in all conditions. Severe or dusty driving conditions might decrease that number. Easier driving conditions might increase it slightly. Go with whatever you feel comfortable with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 03:55 pm:

Big difference today with gasoline, it very clean with driers and additives that didn't exist in Model T days, the old gas had a lot of kerosene and made lots more carbon i.e. sludge forming stuff than today's gas.

Wouldn't do a kerosene wash of the crankcase of a running engine. Save that wash when you take the engine apart!

Best results are to change the oil often, for me after every tour, those are mostly week long and 500 miles long.

To get most all old oil out, run the T til slightly warm, then park, with the front end up on some small blocks to get a tilt to the crankcase, that will allow more of the oil in the pan dippers to drain out.

Refill, with fresh, and leave the top petcock open until the tiny drip stream is gone, you then know the crankcase is full up. Most times the cheaper new oils are in 5 quart jugs. So I pour in most of it, and look for the open top petcock to announce the crankcase is full. But, be sure to close that petcock too :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 04:07 pm:

T hamks for the posts! Interesting... is the red oil levels above, all the oil the crank really has to work with?? If so, it indicates just how critical the oil level is. I envisioned the lower arms of the crank being submerged to a much greater extent!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, May 13, 2017 - 04:15 pm:

The Victor Page textbook is not an official Ford Motor Company publication so some of things in it should be taken with a grain of salt.

It says when the Ford engine is new and there is no oil leakage, oil consumption is about one quart per 100 miles of operation.

The author says that his experience was he had to add one quart of oil for every five gallons of gasoline consumed during operation.

If he was getting 20 miles per gallon, then that would support his statement that his car used one quart of oil every 100 miles.

Again, take Victor Page's writing with a grain of saltů..


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration