An original tire mold-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: An original tire mold-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 08:11 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Griffin in Brea, CA on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 10:36 pm:

A vulcanizer? I thought tires were hand-laid of individual strips of rubber, not molded as they are today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 05:58 am:

My brother was a tire builder for Uniroyal until the mid 90's. He built up the tires with various materials and layers then they were installed in the molds and tread and sidewalls were all cooked up together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 06:14 am:

Very cool. I've never seen how tires were made, always wondered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 08:31 am:

I worked in a retread shop in the early '70s. Like being in hell in the summer months but one of the better places to work in the winter. Rubber for the treads came in long strips to wrap around the casing once the casing was ground down to the cords. Grinding was a dirty, messy, dusty job. You looked like a coal miner at the end of the day. Cooking the tread would last for 6 to 8 hours and had quite a smell. Did passenger tires and 10.00/20 truck tires. One bus company had us mold slicks and then cut zig-zag grooves in them with a router. Why they did that I never could figure out because it didn't save them any money it was more labor intensive. The molds were heavy and you had to change them when changing tread designs and very easy way to be badly burned if you need to change before they completely cooled.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 08:34 am:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IsSwmR8bck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Griffin in Brea, CA on Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 06:25 pm:

Thanks for the info! I'm surprised at how much hand work still goes into making a tire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Friday, May 19, 2017 - 03:02 am:

Boy, That video brings lots of memories from when I worked as a mechanic at BF Goodrich. Those were bias plys they were using and had no steel. You could see the thick tread that was being applied that had just been extruded and cut to length.

Processing the raw rubber involved mixing it between big rollers after adding carbon black which gives the tire much better wear. It is super fine and I still find it on my hands from some of my tools after many many years gone from there. Going to work at Ford Assembly Plant was a much better job...

I was lucky to have not had to work in the Curing Room hot with lots of steam


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Friday, May 19, 2017 - 03:24 am:

Some good photos of an early tyre factory here:

http://www.tehnoart.eu/tyre-factory.html


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