OT - Fix Or Repair Daily...

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT - Fix Or Repair Daily...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 08:36 am:

I have a 1961 F-250 2WD with a 292 engine.

Needed to replace the in cab mounted fuel tank. The original tank developed a leak at the bottom, separation of the two sections.

The comment here is -- It Was Easy. Did not have to remove any window dressing to expose the fuel tank, the connections were accessible, with a bit of help the tank lifted out with no fuss.

Any opinions as to when automobile and truck manufactures decided that the repair of the most simple item would require special tools, and total stripping of the vehicle to replace a light bulb?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 09:21 am:

When the engineers didnt have to build or work on vehicle anymore. What looks good on a computer is not the case in the real world. Who ever thought it was a good idea to put the fuel pump in the tank never had to change one with a full tank. Removing the inner fender to change a headlight bulb? Ya, thats a great design. We can explain what a fuel pump is later! LOL.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 09:59 am:

IMHO sometime not long after WWII the automotive industry (as well as most others) crossed a philosophical line in thinking. The ability to repair a product was no longer a design criteria. In fact, I believe they understood that if you can't fix it you'll need to replace it. It's a large part of the notion of planned obsolescence and the throw-away culture we live in today.

Just my $0.02 worth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 10:50 am:

Dallas, I commented years ago that when automotive engineers go to Hell, they have to spend eternity working on cars they designed.... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 10:58 am:

George, Its just a sign of the times; vehicles made in 1961 compared to vehicles, nowadays, are like comparing vehicles made in 1961 to vehicles made in 1911.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 02:12 pm:

This is the very argument I make about owning anything newer than 1970. The
newer you get, the worse the BS of working on them. And it IS all by design. If
you can't work on it, you will have to bring it in for repairs. They get you coming
on full retail sales price, and they get you going at the service desk. And all the
while, the owner/buyer parades about in a super-ugly, plastic POS to let everyone
know they don't have a lick of sense or aesthetic taste !

I always love the oblivious boob that gives me the thumbs up and makes a moronic
comment about his $60,000 F-350 having something of kinship with my TT. Yeah ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cliff Colee on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 02:38 pm:

One of our friends owns a car dealership.

Dealerships do not make their money on car sales. To the contrary, they sometimes make nothing or even lose a few dollars to push a car out the door. (Except for that ridiculous "Document Processing Fee" which I absolutely will not pay even if it means losing an otherwise satisfactory deal).

The dealership makes most of its income on servicing the cars. So, for them, the more complicated the car the better off they are.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 02:49 pm:

Cliff, two other places they make there money on is the trade in and the financing. You are right that they don't make much on the new car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 03:56 pm:

Cliff is partially correct; Dean is 100% correct. Most dealers aren't so wealthy that they can take a vehicle in trade giving the previous owner full used retail price, so they offer as little as they can (no more than used wholesale price) but inflate their appraisal by adding in the difference between Wholesale To Dealer Price (Dealer Factory Invoice) and the Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price (window sticker). Example: customer brings in a 2006 Chevy Cobalt in good mechanical condition but defects in appearance. Book says the car in that condition is worth between $500- $1000, wholesale. The car the customer is buying has a difference between Factory Wholesale To Dealer price and Manufacturers Suggested Retail Price of $2000. The dealer can inflate the trade in ($500) to look like the previous owner is getting full retail price ($1500.) and still make money on the new car and the trade in. At least that's how it worked when I sold vehicles for a Ford dealer. Most dealers will not discount parts except to dealership employees, fleet accounts, or other businesses in the automotive repair trade. Labor prices between dealers can vary as I have found out. Big city dealers tend to charge as high as the market will allow and small country dealers with less overhead can charge lower rates.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 06:28 pm:

'I always love the oblivious boob that gives me the thumbs up and makes a moronic
comment about his $60,000 F-350 having something of kinship with my TT. Yeah ...'

Gee... I guess this is bragging..I have a $300 dollar 1984 F350 diesel. The engine is a International mechanical injection - what I call old school diesel.

It will not do the rolling coal move..which may explain why a fellow in their new chipped out $60,000 black smoke diesel freaks out when I pull up to the pumps and begin to pump fuel into the tanks...

Yep it is a hybrid Ford...you know -- Fix or repair daily..


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