Running board box

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Running board box
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 06:53 am:

I was given this wooden box which would make an ideal running board tool/battery box. It is a WW 1 Military item. This one was re-purposed and used to store 'Buckles,brass,1".



I have never seen dovetailing like this.



I wonder how it was machined. How did it go together and have the top snd bottom edges on line? What advantage does doing it this way confer?

The timber is Hoop pine. Fortunately, I have some put aside which I can use to make a lid.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 07:25 am:

If they are all exactly alike they were machined, but if there are slight differences they may have been hand cut. Look for scratch marks around the cuts where a knife was used instead of a pencil for layout purposes.

If machined, I am not sure how.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 07:37 am:

The advantage is that once the sides are together and the bottom attached it will not likely come apart except for wood failure. I have only seen one other box constructed with angled finger joints (my grandfather made one) then soaked it in the Satilla River there was no glue used but the box would not come apart. His did not look that even because it was done by hand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 08:24 am:

Nice box!

I think it's done by machine. The machine cut straight, but if the wood piece is held at an angle, the cuts will be angled :-)

Maybe they weren't exactly even as the sides were put together, but a simple planning operation would make them uniform.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 08:35 am:

Tom, the joint is very regular, so I'm thinking it was a machined joint. The bottom is the same timber, screwed in place, so it will not come adrift. I guess G.R. that makes it very strong. I could not see it coming apart while the bottom was still fixed.

Of the three I have seen, the one complete one had an interesting lid set-up. If you divide the top into quarters, the two end quarters were screwed on as well. The centre, now half, was made to slide in place with a stepped joint under the two end pieces. It was held in place with a recessed latch. All beautifully made, way over spec, as is most military stuff. Our taxes at work!

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 08:44 am:

That is neat. I love the look of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 09:42 am:

I hope you're not tempted to paint it black, Allan. If that were my box, I'd sand it pretty good and put a nice natural finish on it to show off that distinctive box joint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Syverson on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 07:37 pm:

The fact that the joints tilt up on one corner, and down on the other leads me to think they are machine cut. If you were doing it by hand, you would make them tilt the same way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 10:13 pm:

What a wonderful puzzle!

I am nearly certain that this was made by laying the wood at 45 degrees, and tilting the saw blade. The joints go together at 45 degrees and there is no preferential or square way to pull them apart like a normal dovetail. By nailing on the bottom it is now impossible to slide them apart. A normal dovetail could be pulled apart at the top, but this one cannot.
There is a similar "impossible" puzzle in metalworking circles where two parts are joined by what looks like a keystone dovetail on all 4 sides...impossible? Nope, it slides apart diagonally with no effort.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 11:49 pm:

I found the photo of the original box I first saw when working on WW1 TV shoot. Note the details for the lid. Now I'm torn between making a full sized flat lid, or duplicating the less practical design of the original.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 10:35 am:

I've never seen a box joint like that. Interesting!


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