Interesting Maltese Ford Pan

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Interesting Maltese Ford Pan
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 10:44 am:

Got a few pics of an engine pan currently located in Malta. Obviously modified, but what for? Snout cut off and pan ears gone. The ears look very neatly removed with little obvious evidence of them having been there. Also, interesting engine number markings.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 10:47 am:

Looks like two inspection covers? The inside view does not look the way you would expect, given the outside view.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 10:50 am:

The side accessible oil drain plugs probably point to a very tight, limited clearance application, like a boat. And it is on an island...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Weaver on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 10:52 am:

Are those oil connections to the bottom pan? Maybe it's part of a boat conversion at one point? - Matt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 10:58 am:

Matthew,

I assume they're oil connections. Boat conversion is a thought.

Dale,

I don't think those are drain plugs. Too high up to drain any oil.



Notice also what appears to be an oil spout headed into the #1 trough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 11:12 am:

The serial number is a 1926 model year engine made in December 1925. The Ford USA stamping is normal for export engines by the mid 20's - our Swedish engines that came through the Copenhagen factory has it too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Evan in Paso Robles on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 11:49 am:

Also no wishbone mount.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 01:11 pm:

Evan,

Good catch! And like the mounting ears, doesn't look to have ever had one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 01:22 pm:

Looks like a factory-made (stamped) accessory inspection plate, due to the two drain plug "blisters" as well as the dams on each of the three rod bearing troughs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 01:30 pm:

Don't you find it odd that the two raised oil connection areas on the outside of the cover are not visible from the inside? Looks like the cover is a two piece affair, but the purpose of that seems unclear.

The trough dams, being angled as they are, suggest that the engine was not meant to operate while sitting horizontal, as with boat engines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 01:35 pm:

Jerry - I said "drain plugs", but in thinking about it,....I think you're right. I think oil lines were connected to those two fittings on what I called "blisters" in an effort to keep the rod bearing troughs as full as possible while the engine was running! Seems an even better idea than the single accessory oil line modification to the timing gear area at the front of the engine that we're all familiar with, huh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 01:42 pm:

Yup! A "two-piece" affair for sure! Very confusing to my feeble mind for sure!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 01:44 pm:

Well,....now I'm REALLY confused, as there are the horse shoe reinforcement rings to consider too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 01:48 pm:

Perhaps for a boat motor ??? Malta is an island after all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 04:37 pm:

If it was for a boat, would not the front of the engine be raised to allow less of angle for the drive shaft through the hull. Therefore need the dams in the oil troughs. Oil pumped into the front opening and out the rear. Cannot tell how thick the accessory plate is, but has to be thick enough to hide the openings. Also, have the troughs been modified to have less depth with dams in the rear? Hard to tell with just these photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike conrad on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 07:30 pm:

Wild guess, how about a airplane application? No pan snout needed if the prop was off the front of the crankshaft, also the engine would have a angle on the runway with a tail dragger. Wild guess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 07:58 pm:

For airplane, wouldn't need a transmission and I think the prop would have been mounted to flywheel flange. I agree about being boat motor, re the prop drive shaft being at the same angle as the motor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 08:02 pm:

The crankcase is from the engine of a Falcon, a Maltese Falcon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike conrad on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 11:05 pm:

Lol Mark!! Good point, what the heck was I thinking! Lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 11:25 pm:

Bill has it. The pan is from Sydney Greenstreet's Falcon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 02:55 am:

Ford Canada offered a marine conversion with a "high speed" reverse using the planetary transmission. It appears in the 26 parts catalog


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 08:23 am:

Its got the Terry Horlock oil dams in the inspection cover so must be a mountain ford!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 08:36 am:

Les,

That's very interesting! Wonder if this is part of that set-up.

I have pics of the engine block as well, but there is absolutely nothing unique about it. There was no flywheel or transmission found with this thing. Maybe that means it was just missing, or maybe it wasn't used for the purposes of this set-up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 10:01 am:

After reading the question about taking off the water pump got me to thinking, I wonder if the extra plate on the bottom, because it has two fittings, is part of the cooling system. Something like the extra deep finned plates used on race cars, only in this case using water instead of air to cool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 10:08 am:

Mark,

I wondered the same thing. Was hoping someone would pop up with an original ad, showing this set-up, as happens often on this forum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Sullivan, Powell WY on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 10:18 am:

Having owned 8 Ford Falcons, I find the Maltese Falcon joke very funny


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 11:24 am:

I have on loan to me a copy of the Ford of Canada parts book, it shows the marine conversion parts. I am having issues with getting the scans from the printer to convert to PDF/s to post. I will try later and post them if I can. That is if someone doesn't beat me to it, hint hint :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 12:29 pm:

Mark,

Don't you need JPG's to post here?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 12:04 pm:

Right now, no go on posting the pages. I can't get the photos do what I need.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 04:40 pm:



http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/350975.html

John Page, Australia.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 01:25 pm:

That is some VERY cool information! Thanks!


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