Ok here is a fun one! Any Old Time Radios fans on here?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Ok here is a fun one! Any Old Time Radios fans on here?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Oravez on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 09:27 pm:

Ok so lets take a brake from fixing broken cars for a moment, if your not into Old Time Radio go ahead and skip past this... Or maybe take up a new hobby of OTR listening...

Ok my question is does anybody know if any OTR shows, episodes or otherwise that had a Model T in them? The age of the OTR started in the very early 20's and started to hit it big in the 30's. So to me that would be PRIME model T timeframe.

OTR is filled with all kinds of interesting things that some folks might consider mundane and yet they make it work. I am sure the Model T must have been a player in some of these shows....

Anyone?

Thanks
John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, May 22, 2017 - 10:26 pm:

On radio in the twenties, Whispering Jack Smith sang this song that mentions a Ford.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uGyAzRjPsw

But radio's most famous old car was Jack Benny's Maxwell, played by Mel Blanc.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 12:17 am:

GRANDPA'S RADIO

You can't take it with you. New arrivals in Heaven are issued bright new raiment and new furnishings for that wondrous mansion of many rooms. And that makes perfect sense, because it simply wouldn't do to display any of the old stuff in celestial environs. Can you imagine the consternation of angels gazing from streets of gold upon some new tenant who had stuck a painted lawn jockey or a pair of plastic pink flamingos in the front yard?

Those lives blessed with the full measure of Earthly testing leave behind a residue of anachronism. And so, when Nana and Grandpa took up residence in Heaven, their heirs found occasion to sort through a dynasty of tools, treasures and trash. The attic was a museum of emigration, tenanted by a number of capacious wooden barrels which had made the ocean voyage from Palermo, Sicily, to Ellis Island, New York. They contained, among other things, the oddest looking clothing — odd, not because I'd never seen that style before, but because I'd never seen such garb in color — only in black and white or sepia tone. In the pocket of one musty suit which had not seen the light of day since prohibition was a perfectly preserved leather wallet which contained two items; a dated receipt from a supermarket I'd never heard of and the business card of Grandpa's lawyer — one Fiorello LaGuardia.

There were a number of bureaus and within were artifacts that I wished could talk. I'll never know what the brass key, hidden between the blank pages of an unused, leather-bound notebook opened.

Here in this attic was a dust-covered landscape of the implements and impedimenta of two personal pasts that had become obsolescent even as the couple who compiled the collection yet lived. The items had been compacted and compressed into as small a space as possible, in a location that suffered no requirement to provide any more than minimal access or even footing.

In the center of this aggregation, standing chest-high upon four elaborate legs in quiescent precedence over constituents of lesser stature was a massive piece of wooden furniture — a cabinet radio, circa 1930 or so. The mysterious key in Grandpa's leather-bound notebook couldn't talk, but perhaps this big wooden box still could — and my eyes traveled along the length of a dusty cord which terminated at an inviting-looking, double-pronged plug.

Hmm.

Though freestanding, the radio's cabinetry had been designed for placement up against a wall, so its rear was completely open to inspection of the works within. The magnetic nature of the apparatus was such that a thick layer of dust had caked over and given a uniform opacity to the agglomeration of glass vacuum tubes, which now, under a dim flashlight, was reminiscent of the Manhattan skyline. These vacuum tubes, as they turned out, were still sealed against the air and in working condition, which was a good thing because replacements, no doubt, didn't exist. The wiring, however, was covered with antiquated fabric insulation, which was thoroughly dry-rotted, crumbling at even a gentle touch. This would have to be replaced once I'd relocated the old console to the comfort of my own basement.

For all its formidability, this radio was really a fairly simple contrivance, only a generation or two removed from Marconi's bench. As such, replacing the fabric-covered wiring with modern stuff became a simple matter of unhooking an old wire, screwing down a new one in its place and repeating until done.

After the radio was thus refitted, it was hooked it up to a very long extension cord, the full span of which was drawn out before having been plugged into a wall switch operated electrical outlet in a distant room. If the thing were going to detonate upon activation, I firmly resolved to be elsewhere during the event.

When we finally switched it on, a speaker behind the ornate wooden grille made that deep-pitched, 'bwooo-ieee' sound of substantial amperage yawning and stretching, and a dim yellow light behind the tuning numbers swelled into being. The set took several minutes to completely warm up and there was the musty smell of old dust getting hot. The vibrant, hackle-raising feel about the thing, alive, made it very clear that this was no transistorized, digital toy from Japan. This beast was a juice-guzzling powerhouse made by General Electric when the general was still a lieutenant. This was the kind of electrical equipment that made the lights dim in the warden's office.

While doing the repairs, I had made it a point to be careful not to move the tuning knob, just on the chance that it was still tuned to the station of my grandfather's preference, and sure enough, it was now perfectly centered on frequency, sucking in a strong New York station. And this ancient artifact; this relic of a bygone era when entire families gathered to listen to 'The Shadow,' and 'The Lone Ranger,' and had bitten their nails over 'The War of The Worlds,' was now resurrected, surging with power and probably warping the Earth's Van Allen belts. The reception was surprisingly crisp and clear and I stood in rapt attention, listening as it played—

It's Fun to Stay at the YMCA.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 12:23 am:

In the TV show I remember the Maxwell being a touring car.
BTW, I'm pretty certain that's a 46 Che&*&*Y behind him


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 12:30 am:

Only the shadow knows...........................

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 03:38 am:

We were never told what kind of car the Green Hornet's Black Beauty was. Do you suppose...?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 05:47 am:

I agree that Jack Benny's Maxwell was a touring car by the time I saw it on TV. The Texaco commercials were worth watching back then.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yB_hzPnrDBs


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 06:00 am:

What type of car did Amos and Andy have for a taxi on the radio? (not the TV redo)

Did Fibber Magee and Molly ever talk about a car?

Senator Claghorn have a car?

Life of Riely did they mention a car?

All good radio shows.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 08:25 am:

I doubt that they ever said it on the radio, but this is the taxi from their movie.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 08:38 am:

Bob; Don't give up almost all of the vacuum tubes for the old radio's are still available some N.O.S but China and Malaysia are still producing new ones. My cousin overhauled my radio for the 46 ply. I gave him 2 of them and said I wanted one working he fixed them both the hardest part is getting new "cloth" on the speakers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 09:08 am:

Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows... The Shadow, mysterious figure who aids the forces of law and order, is in reality Lamont Cranston, wealthy young man about town. Years ago in the Orient, Cranston learned a strange and mysterious secret—the hypnotic power to cloud men's minds so they cannot see him. Cranston's friend and companion, the lovely Margot Lane, is the only person who knows to whom the voice of the invisible shadow belongs. Today's adventure: Flivver of Death!

It's remarkable, the clutter that remains in our noggins for decades. You can guess which part I made up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 10:08 am:

That Maxwell actually belonged to the late Raymond Thompson. His son Tom still owns it to this day. They used to drive it from Anaheim California to Palm Springs to buy dates in the late 1940's. Raymond was asked to drive a dignitary in a parade in Anaheim and found it was to be Jack Benny so he drove his Maxwell to the event. When Jack saw the car he said "Well I'll be damned it really is a Maxwell".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 10:23 am:

I wonder if they stopped at Hadley's for a date malt (a swell thing on a hot day.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 11:53 am:

Dang! I hadn't thought of Hadley's or a Date malt since I was a kid in grade school! My folks would take the family to Palm Springs area (usually Dessert Hot Springs) for our vacation. Since we had a summer resort, the only time we could get away for a vacation was during the school Christmas vacation. So we would leave where there was appropriate Snow for Christmas to where it was warm and sunny for Christmas!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 05:50 pm:

TCM ran that movie just to demonstrate racial bias in Hollywood. Couldn't,t see it through. Enough to make your skin crawl.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 05:57 pm:

It wasn't just Hollywood. It was everywhere. Doc Whitmore told me when he went in the army they had him treating mules because the white officers didn't want the black doctors working on people. There are plenty of other examples of how we were in the Good Old Days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 07:25 pm:

Dennis, Fibber McGee and Molly talked about a car several times but no brand was ever mentioned that I know of.

I'm a HUGE F and M fan!!! The writing by Don Quinn was and is timeless and the humor and word play still holds up today.

LOVE old time radio. We listen to Sirius channel 148 all the time -- it's all OTR -- especially on long trips. It really makes the time fly.

I've been recreating old time radio show in the Detroit area for many years, complete with vintage sound effects live on stage and using my collection of vintage microphones. I've got a file cabinet full of old radio scripts and a corner of my basement is filled with old time sound effects stuff.

I rewrote "It's A Wonderful Life" for the ear and it has been very popular around here at Christmas time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill's Auto Works Wakeman, Ohio on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 09:04 pm:

I also am hooked on channel 148 of Sirius/XM. Since I drive up to 15,000 miles per month, it helps pass the time.
I love the references to the old cars & the sound effects are hilarious.
I am not much into the comedies, but love the detective shows as well as the westerns!
Bill Squires
Bill's Auto Works


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 12:07 am:

We listened to the radio programs on Saturday nights. Judy Canova, "Gang Busters", The Lone Ranger,that William Conrad stared in. If you looked real hard your mind could actually see the players in the program. Our imaginations were much more keen then.

Our Zenith floor model had that every so spooky green tuning eye. It flashed and winked as the sound elevated. For a 6 year old it was really scary.

juat sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 12:28 am:

This one is only 43 years old, but i remember going to sleep listening to it..CBS Radio Mystery Theater. :-)
http://www.cbsrmt.com/synopsis.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 01:13 am:


The Lone Ranger was played by Brace Beemer. "The daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains."

William Conrad played Matt Dillon.

George Walsh: Around Dodge City and in the territory on west, there's just one way to handle the killers and the spoilers—That's with a U.S. marshal, and the smell of Gunsmoke!
[Theme by Rex Koury]
Gunsmoke!, the story of the violence that moved west with young America, and the story of a man that moved with it.
Conrad: I'm that man. Matt Dillon, United States marshal, the first man they look for and the last they want to meet. It's a chancy job, and it make a man watchful—and a little lonely.


Howard McNear (Doc Adams), William Conrad (Matt Dillon), Georgia Ellis (Kitty Russell), Parley Baer (Chester Wesley Proudfoot)


Judy Canova, a Saturday night favorite. Mel Blanc was Pedro "Pardon me for talking in your face, Señorita."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 11:46 am:

Still have my Grandmother's Old Halson Model 60-M radio with the tuning eye that I brought back to life as a teenager. I ran a ground and antenna out my second story bedroom window. It picked up the broadcast band plus two short wave channels. It sits silent on top of our player piano these days. I might just dust it off this winter and awake it from it's fifty year sleep!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 01:25 pm:


One Saturday night a couple of years ago I picked up the Opry on WSM with my Philco.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 02:44 pm:

I have an old radio similar to yours Jay. I just wish I knew where to find someone to get it into working order.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill's Auto Works Wakeman, Ohio on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 03:25 pm:

Being only 54 years old, I was not old enough to listen to the radio shows, so they are all new to me. I was shocked at just how many shows William Conrad was in besides Gunsmoke!
Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 03:39 pm:

Steve,

Doc Adams? That's Floyd Smoot! I'd recognize him anywhere.

(ya, I know, same guy...)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Griffin in Brea, CA on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 04:03 pm:

Guys, don't just plug in an old radio--you could fry it for good! Check out this web site:

www.radiolaguy.com/info/Dont-Do.htm

Sorry I don't know how to make it a link.

Greg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Griffin in Brea, CA on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 04:03 pm:

Looks like it linked itself.


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