"Eggy" Wheels

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: "Eggy" Wheels
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Sommers on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 05:04 pm:

Several years ago, when I bought my '13 Touring, the previous owner warned my not to let the car rest on the tires for more than a few days in one spot. He claimed that in doing so, the wheels developed a flat spot, and the wheels would then be "eggy" (I guess shaped like an egg). In cars stored for extended periods I have seen jack stands, but my question is... how long can I leave my car sit before needing to put it on jack stands?

Thanks
Mike Sommers


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 05:15 pm:

He's talking about the tires. Nylon cord tires were known for flat spotting. I've never seen one flatten permanently, but there are probably some that have seen it. I keep my cars on stands, just to be easy on the whole tire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Sommers on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 05:21 pm:

Gary,
Thanks for your response. When he told me this, I assumed that he meant the tires, but he was adamant that the wheels could also get flattened. I am sure he was not a T expert, so I am hoping it is just fluff. My question still stands... how long to let the car set on the tires, before putting it on jack stands?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 05:34 pm:

For my two cents worth life is too short to play silly games!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 05:38 pm:

Bud said it right!
Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 07:12 pm:

I fixed cars professionally for 40+ years and never saw any wheel or rim bent except by impact. Car wheels now are much lighter made than T rims ever were. My T demountable rims were out of round but they were that way from potholes, etc. You have no cause for concern.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Sommers on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 07:32 pm:

Gary- Thanks for your professional answer. Clearly the previous owner was passing on a "Model T Myth". Answering this was something that was important to me as I learn about preserving these incredible cars. I am angered at snide remarks, that inhibit people from asking questions, for fear of being assaulted. I suspect that few Model T experts emerged from their mothers' womb as having all the knowledge and all the answers, so I always have to question as to why they think that everyone should be as 'smart' as they.
Regards,
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 07:54 pm:

Henry Austin Clark insisted that all his cars with wood spoke wheel be raised off the ground when on display to keep the weight of the car from resting on one or two spokes. Obviously he was talking about a car sitting for years on display not just for a month or two. I can't say if he was right or wrong but he never wavered in his belief. My own experience has been that nylon tires can in fact develop flat spots that will not work out. When I purchased my Chalmers-Detroit it had been sitting in a garage in the same position for more than 15 years and the flat spots were so pronounced that you could not drive the car over 25 mph without kidney failure. I assumed that the flat spots could be worked out once the tires warmed up and were driven on. I was wrong! I drove it that way for 2 years trying to work out the flat spots with no success and eventually had to replace them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 08:01 pm:

Someone people have said to me the old bias ply did do that my mom and dad's old car,dad always said they got flat spots after sitting. He had a early motor home and it bounces for a couple miles and would smooth. Jmho Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 08:10 pm:

Michael,

Yes he was probably talking about the nylon tires. The wheels are funny things to think about, if you have wood spokes the car sits on the lower spokes as if you were sitting at your kitchen chair and all the weight is on the legs. If the car has wire wheels the car is not sitting on the spokes but is hanging on the upper wires like if you were sitting on a swing hung from a chain.

The wood spokes are not going to change from the weight of the car just like your house walls are not going drop down because the roof is pressing down on the wall studs.

Lots of Model T myths that continue, I guess they are just funny to hear if you know better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 09:16 pm:

Tire saver jacks were sold back when the T's were new for cars that weren't used over the winter - a good idea, especially if the tires are allowed to loose pressure until flat or almost flat.

Myths about stiff stuff like spokes bending over time reminds me of the odd idea that crank shafts bends if allowed to lie down unsupported.. If so, why doesn't the long driveshaft bend that is always lying down, unsupported in the middle :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 10:45 pm:

Tire saver jacks were also marketed for every day use, to prevent deterioration of the tires due to contact with water, grease and oil on the garage floor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 10:56 am:

Marketing pitches and actual benefits are two entirely different things.
If the tire saver jack people thought they could sell more jacks by saying
gave the buyer more sex appeal and emotional stability, they would have
done so.


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