Hooking up the sediment bowl: using compression fittings

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Hooking up the sediment bowl: using compression fittings
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

My co-worker gave me some compression fitting in elbow shape to run the steel fuel line from my 26/27 cowl tank sediment bowl to the carburetor. I've heard a lot of naysayers concerning compression fittings, what's the deal? Seems like a much sturdier setup than the original felt and packing nut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mosher on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 06:05 pm:

I use compression fittings on my 27 and I didn't have any problems. The only thing about using a compression fitting there only a one time use and they can crack. So be careful when you tighten them
Other people my chime in about using those fittings


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 06:59 pm:

Disadvantage of compression fittings is the copper or steel compression ring won't crimp well to the Ford carb fitting, as the taper isn't made for that type fitting. For the correct compression fit, use of all new compression fittings at the carb will be needed to replace the Ford parts.


Ford used a felt seal, but modern soft gas line tubing is a better replacement. The soft seal stuffed in the Ford gas line nut provides some 'give' with the shaking and twisting the T motor will do to that gas line :-)




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 07:05 pm:

Spot on Dan.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 07:54 pm:

I have compression fitting in the forms of elbows for both ends, so it sounds like I should be alright then! I may have another proper elbow laying around though. If I can find the correct one I'll of course use that instead. Trying to correct my fuel flow issues before a parade I'm supposed to be in Saturday morning.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 08:17 pm:

Matthew,
I would use the compression FITTINGS but use the rubber fuel line in them instead of the compression fitting. The compression fittings will do fine with the rubber piece; the tube can move around as it is want to do, and no leaks, no cracks, no errors--oops, that's baseball. . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 09:47 pm:

Use the fitting that are made for air lines on big trucks. They're kind of cone shaped and extend and brace the line farther forward of the ferrule. The kind shown will break at the forward end of the ferrule from vibration.

If DOT sees any of the the kind in the picture above, you'll likely be out of service until they are replaced.

Of course, if you know this, you'd never put them on in the first place. They're just against the rules for air fittings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 10:36 pm:

I use string...has not failed me yet on gas or hydraulic brake lines. Dental floss works good and so does cotton string.

On The Great Race from Atlanta to San Diego, R Ricks's #13 developed a brake leak that they had trouble fixing. String as a compression ring did the trick .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Friday, May 26, 2017 - 04:48 am:

Compression fittings cause gas lines to snap off all of a sudden. Seen it happen a few times. The issue is rather simple if you sit back and think about it. For those cars where the gas tank is under the front seat and the carb is located well forward of that, you have the rear end of the gas line fixed to the gas tank which is mounted to the typical flimsy T frame. The forward end of the gas line is mounted to the heavy motor. The gas tank and motor do NOT move together as a unit. The frame will wind and twist as the T travels over hill and dale and the motor and gas tank will see up down and sideways movements independent of each other. You need the ends to not leak but to be flexible and the rubber packing works very well when used at both ends of the fuel line. I use a short piece of neoprene gas line hose to make my gas line packings. Compression fittings create a stiff clamp and the gas line when it wiggles will have metal fatigue created right at the place where the sharp edge has been created by the compression bead. The bead is clamped tight in the carb fitting while the other end of the gas line is moving up down and sideways. It doesn't take too long for the gas line to fail at the the compression bead location.


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