Here's one for the "pickers"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Here's one for the "pickers"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, May 28, 2017 - 07:49 pm:

Another "rare one"! Really, it says so in the description. Not sure about the turtle deck...was there some kind of "stretch roadster" at one time? LOL...maybe this is why it's so rare! :-)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1912-Ford-Model-T-Roadster-Runabout-/142396698773?hash=i tem2127813095:g:bZ4AAOSw9OFZKlUF&vxp=mtr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Sunday, May 28, 2017 - 08:07 pm:

Not the most original "T" out there, but I like it just the same.
The photographs are of the highest quality and really let you see exactly what you would be getting- very nice!
Too bad they didnt assemble that top and have a picture of that as well.
Again, not an original body, but no less a "T" than the myriad depot hacks and speedsters that have been created in the recent past. I would consider this example a modern tribute to an Edwardian "Gentleman's Speedster".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Sunday, May 28, 2017 - 08:42 pm:

Would like to see pictures of the motor and underneath the car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Sunday, May 28, 2017 - 09:22 pm:

Nice car....not original, not true to type, but a nice car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Sunday, May 28, 2017 - 09:38 pm:

I'd pull that deck and replace it with a nice, natural finish oak pickup bed and have the nicest truck at Concours De Elegance!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, May 28, 2017 - 10:01 pm:

Nice speedster.

Would look better if it had 30 x 3.5 aftermarket wire wheels with clincher tires instead of the 26-27 wheels. Just my opinionů.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison - Rice, Minnesota on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 12:24 am:

The non-original front axle, wire wheels, waterpump, starter and high VIN make me a bit concerned regarding the authenticity of this 1912 Model T Ford.

That being said, I think it's a neat little car! And when you get right down to it my Touring car isn't all that correct either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 03:17 am:

Model Ts are such wonderful cars! There is room in the hobby for people of all kinds of interest, taste, and level of participation. In so many ways, in so many clubs, and different activities, Not all people's vision of a model T is acceptable. Black era Ts are not generally allowed on pre-16 tours. Touring cars and sedans do not belong on speedster runs. And many speedster runs have era restrictions that even many speedsters are not allowed on some of them.
As for being a "real" 1912? This car isn't. "Rare"? Yes, in the same way any bowling ball size rock carried out of a river canyon is. There isn't another one anywhere in the world exactly like it!
In one way, I kind of like the turtle deck. It gives the car an English or Australian look to it. Too bad they tried to copy the standard T turtle deck of 1913, only stretched out. Keep it, or change the back end to something more like the T open roadster, and have a fun car that looks pretty good. That way, you might even qualify for some of the speedster activities. Or do like Dale W says and have a purty pickup.
These wannabe brass cars are kind of a difficult thing. Think the rock and a hard place. I know several people that have or did have made up brass cars. Some of them were really sharp looking. And with all the Rootlieb steel and beautiful reproduction brass, they can be a crowd-pleaser. As well as a really fun to drive or tour with early looking car. And yet, you don't have to worry about all those valuable (and fragile) parts.
One friend I know (not mentioning any names, they can confess their own sins if they want to (joking)) (By the way photos would be nice, not for picking apart, but for admiring such a beautiful car), he says he has a wonderful time taking kids and family on long old car tours his '10 touring. This car, he openly admits is a made up car with a fully later chassis, and some reproduction parts. He also has some very nice correct cars, some HCCA, some later, and a beater or two. He finds all of them to be a lot of fun to drive and enjoy. But in slightly different ways.

I just don't like it when dealer types feel they have to use all kinds of glowing lies and "buzz words" to sell a fun car. Language is supposed to mean something. The way these people are going, a cup of coffee won't even mean a cup of coffee pretty soon. It almost doesn't now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Pergande, Essexville MI on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 03:40 am:

Wayne...I like the way you stated that...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 07:17 am:

Wayne, amazingly put.

While this site focuses mainly on "correct" cars, some of us (myself included) have (or want) cars that live in the spirit of T's. Some will never be correct no matter how hard you try, just because of their previous history of parts that have gotten swapped, or modifications made, or the fact they started with boxes of parts and a bare frame---but yet another one lives and can be driven.

I do my best to have a vehicle that outwardly "appears" stock, but there are things (several) that could be easily picked apart---the major being it was a cut off touring made into a pickup. None the less, I am having a blast with it, and 97 percent of the public wouldn't even know, or just don't care. What they see is someone out in a cool, really old car having fun. The smiles, waves, and honks I get from the public far out weigh any incorrectness my truck has...and isn't what this hobby is about? Happiness to myself and others?

I whole heartedly agree that some of these "dealers" are starting to take things way to far. That is typical for I believe for most sales people. That's their job, to sell something. I just don't appreciate when someone gets suckered into a expensive car that really shouldn't be. The internet is full of information, researching before you buy is your best course of action nowadays. I wish I had done more of that before I bought my T 12 years ago, but I was young and impatient....and I didn't spend alot (but more than I should have). In my eyes, I still have not exceeded the vehicles true value even after years of restoring various segments of it.

What I see in that auction is someones interpretation of a car they wanted, and most likely knew it wasn't correct upon building it. It is nice looking car that combines many styles of builds. The person selling it (obviously NOT the original builder) is a dealer, and admits they are and is simply trying to make a buck. He obviously gets caught up in what the public would---all the brass work. Not even a mention of the auxiliary transmission, or the drivetrain other than it is a 4 cylinder. I do believe it is overpriced at the buy it now price, maybe something about half that my be applicable, Maybe he has to much into it and is hoping to get more out of it. But no where in that auction does it ever say it's original, but to the unknowing, it could be construed that way. If he simply left out the part of how rare it is, it would make that listing a whole lot better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 08:18 am:

I agree with Dale, toss a little pickup bed on the back. And while your at it why not put the correct spoked wheels on varnished to match the rest of the wood. Although a walnut might match better than oak. The joints on the steering wheel do bother me as well. Other than what I see is the death of the HCCA.

The car looks to be a great little driver and something that could be run on many tours etc. Something inexpensive that will most likely be bought by somebody who does not have a brass T. Instead of welcoming a new member most likely the car would be picked apart discourging that person entirely. In retrospect there should be a desire to welcome whoever no matter whatever their car. Time will tell whether the person will be content at 30mph in a stock T, wanting to run a hot car, or end up in a different club entirely. I try to gear my thoughtsnot where the hobby is today but where it might be in 15-20 years when my Son is driving. I grew up where there were multiple car clubs to be a member of (local chapters) and now the closest there is is a once a month drive in where everybody is welcome whether you have a T or a Viper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 08:32 am:

I'm sure someone from CA will identify this vehicle yet with some background info.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 08:36 am:

Wayne..excellent comments. Particularly your last sentence. My sentiments exactly. It is a neat little car, as always, I wonder what his reserve is, given that it's really such a "bitsa".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 08:49 am:

I wonder if that long tail look would go away with the top installed?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, May 29, 2017 - 12:02 pm:

To me that car was a waste of time, but then as long as the owner had fun doing it, I'm happy for him.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 08:32 am:

Is it me or does it look lowered?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Goble on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 09:26 am:

To me this add boarders on fraud . I worry about the new comer that really thanks they are getting a once in a life time chance to buy 1912 Model T . The add says IT"s a 1912 T , In my mind it should say something like this car was inspired by a 1912 Model T ford . Sometimes it looks like a duck ,walks like a duck , but it's not a duck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 01:03 pm:

Are we looking for the perfect T? We each have the right to compare these cars to our idea of what a T should be.
If we saw this T going down the street with a lad in his twenties driving it, maybe with a big smile on his face, a era correct hat, shirt, tie and vest, wouldn't that make a difference?
I was a little offended at the first glace too. After several years of following the form I have discovered the many ways people have found to enjoy a Model T. Knowing what is correct doesn't make us arrogant purists. But even pointing out what is wrong is one way to enjoy the hobby.
Even the way I build cars has evolved over 50 some years. I think maybe I am enjoying the attitude and attachment each of us has for what we drive and do as much as the cars themselves.
Thank you Wayne and others for your wisdom.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John From Oregon on Friday, June 02, 2017 - 11:15 am:

Good grief, the bidding is almost to $21,000!
Reserve hasn't been met yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 08:53 am:

Is there anyone out there who is selling a "restored" vehicle capable of using the words "reproduction 19** Model T"?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 11:07 am:

I like it. I agree that it is far from original. I'm not very knowledgeable about the brass-era Ts. Can you attach a starter to a 1912 engine?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 11:28 am:

John..yes you can. But you have to pull the engine & add a ring gear and change the hogshead to a starter hogshead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 02:40 pm:

Lol, I don't know what they did when taking the pictures, but I thought this thing was a scam at first. It looks to me like it's miniature. Like someone took good closeup photos of a model and they're passing it off as a real car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 12:11 pm:

It is a very nice car but the bottom line is; it is NOT a 1912. Could you build one like it for the price? I don't know, that level of workmanship is past my pay grade.
It is not just converted to electric start, it has a generator so the block is newer then 1919. With 1 hour to go it has not reached reserve. I hope that whom ever is bidding does their homework and is not buying/bidding as an investment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 05:09 pm:

So you own a 1912 Model T. But do you really? You know by appearance it is a Model T Ford.

The car was constructed by the Ford Motor Company between 1908 and 1927. But when the company began building the cars, the model year was based on the motor number, later the motor number was added as the frame number too.

Then there was the issue of FMC suggesting that if you changed the motor of your 1912 Model T Ford, you use a stencil stamp set to place your original model year block number on to your replacement block.

Then if you do own a 1912 Model T Ford, are the valves open or closed, does it have a generator and starter, electric lights or acetylene?

Oh well, it's just a Model T.

Dating a Model T Ford http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG90.html

ENGINE SERIAL NUMBERS http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/sernos.htm

Engine number when changing engine blocks: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/308185.html?1346208511


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