Burger, and others, should look at this.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Burger, and others, should look at this.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 01:36 am:

Since I have trouble copying pictures onto my computer to post, I will just provide a link to theoldmotor from a couple days ago.

http://theoldmotor.com/?p=164646

Some wonderful stuff in this street scene to look at. (I did add some comments there myself.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 02:14 am:

Yeah, ... that is a great shot. Maddening at how many details cannot
be seen clearly ! I would love to just step into this scene and walk all
the way to Los Angeles !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 03:45 am:

I wonder how many glass insulators are on all those poles? It appears to be nearly a hundred per pole on one side of the street. Merely about sixty per pole on the other side of the street. Times how many poles can you count?
Years ago, outside Livermore Califunny where I lived for about 25 years, alongside an old railroad right-of-way, were about a hundred poles with insulators like that. The poles were short, by modern standards. Maybe twenty feet tall. The wires had long been abandoned, and many of them dangled within reach, some laying on the ground for a short distance. Occasionally, as I drove along the road that paralleled the railroad tracks (with the poles between), I could spot an insulator that had fallen to the ground. I never stopped, never picked one up, or pulled on a loose wire. Although I always wanted to. I haven't been down that road in a few years now. I wonder if any of them are still there.
All those old insulators, so close, and yet so far away. I have a few such insulators in my stuff. They were in my grandfather's boxes when he died almost forty years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 08:24 am:

Wayne, wow, that is one cool picture! A forest of poles and insulators, looks neat without all the lines yet strung.
I'm with you Burger...let's go for a walk!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 10:13 am:

I've lived in L.A. all of my life, and have never heard of Belvedere Gardens. I wonder if it is still called that? That part of town these days is 100% Mexican to my knowledge, or darn close.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 10:54 am:

Now you can see why we went to underground utilities!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 12:08 pm:

I would disagree. Underground wiring made scenes like this look sterile.

While the wires are hard or impossible to see, I am quite sure that is a
photo issue. These guys were in service and the wires too fine and the
lighting "just so" to fox them out.

Note the vertical brackets on the poles to the left. These are phantom
tramp brackets. Indicative of a more "sophisticated" technology and probably
suggesting a long distance thru-line on those upper crossarms.

The lower arms with the many pins are local circuits.

Why the 2nd pole line down the right side ? It does not make much sense
in the typical application for one company to run two lines, and in most
situations would indicate another company used that route, either as a rival
provider, or this was just a trunk line with a different end of line .... say one
went to San Diego and the other served a town in the area SE of town.

But being L.A., and given the massive population explosion that occurred
there in the early 20th century, it may just buck the typical and Pacific Tel &
Tel built two lines just to keep up with demand ??? I am sure a little research
could give up that answer.

Either way, I would have a field day with my hooks and belt climbing around
that "jungle gym", picking all the pretty colored and crudely made ones !



It was scenes just like this that piqued my interest in line construction before
I turned 5 years old. I saw all those sparkly colored glass things and all the
wires, pulled like guitar strings .... it was fascinating !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 09:06 pm:

I was never any good at pole climbing. I have done it, but never got the balance quite right. I still have my dad's belt and hooks, and my old belt which I used for many years on tower work. My dad, six foot four and just short of three hundred pounds, could go up and down a pole like a squirrel! I was working with him one day when he "burned" a pole (pole was old and rotten, his hooks cut out and he went to the ground, no serious injury).

I have always been interested in the insulators. But never looked into them much. I know that some are quite valuable as collector's items. I am not sure I would want to know much about which ones are valuable, and which are not. Might have been too tempting to look at at all those along the rail line. I know that like all collectibles, there are many factors that figure into the value. I just have never had even half enough time to spend studying one tenth of the things I would like to have.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 09:19 pm:

I spent 35 years working for Pacific Telephone. I actually worked on a few open wire lines. One interesting fact about them is that when they run parallel to the electric lines, they pick up interference called "induction". When they are connected to the telephones the induction causes a buzzing noise, but when they are disconnected the end must be grounded or you can actually get a shock, when you touch them, from the induced current! So the cables actually were an improvement, not only for the appearance, but the grounded shield removed the induction from the telephone lines. The largest copper cables held 3,600 lines. Later fiber optics replaced the copper cables. Fiber optics actually transmit the conversation by a laser beam which is transmitted through the cable.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, June 03, 2017 - 11:10 pm:

To this crazy bastard's eye, nothing is more beautiful than an openwire
telephone line with all those insulators lit up in the bright sunshine. For
anyone interested, the Burger Museum of Telephony and other Pointless
Artifacts of Americana is open to interested parties who might happen
through Spokanistan. All you gotta do is ask.


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