Steering bushing replacement without removing column.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Steering bushing replacement without removing column.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 06:19 pm:

My steering mount brass bushing was clearly worn out. The steering shaft would deflect noticeably to the right and left. It is possible to change out the brass bushing without removing the whole column.
1) Take the Pittman arm off (that's the one with the ball that pivots back and forth attached to the drag link) using a tie rod removal tool pictured available from FLAPS.

2) Remove the steering wheel, take apart the steering gear box. Pull the steering shaft up out of the column.

3) The bushing can now be hammered out from above using a large punch and a 5 lb sledge hammer. Move the punch around to 12, 3, 6, and 9 o'clock when hammering. Mine moved very slowly at first but then suddenly popped out.

4) Reverse the steps, hammer the new bushing in to the steering mount, put the shaft back in, reassemble the steering gear and wheel, re-attach the Pittman arm. Use a stack of washers and tighten the Pittman arm nut on if necessary to pull the shaft through and/or use a piece of wood to cushion the shaft and hammer it back into place.

My shaft needed a little sanding at a 'hump' above where the Pittman arm mounted to get the new bushing on. The new bushing was not tight on my worn shaft but was much tighter than the old one. I expect a newer less worn shaft might require the bushing to be reamed some.

Use a tie rod end tool to remove the Pittman arm.
Tie rod end tool.
Pull the steering shaft out of the column.
Shaft out of the column.
Using a large punch and 5 lb hammer, tap out the bushing moving from 12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock.
Shaft out of the mount.
Here is the old bushing beside the new one.
Old bushing and new.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 08:08 pm:

Thats a neat trick Ignatio. I would have said a few nasty words trying to get the timer control lever off so I could take the bracket off the frame.

When replacing bushes it is better not to hammer them in. You run the risk of deforming them that way. It is better to pull them in using some all thread, washers and nuts.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 09:10 pm:

Thanks Alan, yes it would have probably been better to use all thread, washers and nuts to put the new bushing back in. Great suggestion. Steering is much better now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 11:31 pm:

Ignacio
Good to hear it worked out. Smart approach to the issue


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 01:15 am:

Neat trick, I'll have to remember that when I need to replace that rascle. I wonder if the front bushing drift punch sold by the vendors would work as well...I got one of those.

Nice looking 22 touring in your profile pic (I always look at everybody's profile pics to see what kind of car they've got...because I never know when I might need some info on any particular year sometime :-) ).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 06:39 am:

I just got through pulling the steering column for rebuilding. Yeah, its a hassle but if you really want to get the job right...pull it. The steering column needed machining to true it up as it had become lightly out-of-round. Once the was done the bushing could be reamed for a perfect fit and pressed in the bracket. The steering is tighter than a bank vault now. The worst part was waiting for the plating joint to get the parts nickel plated.


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