Pre Zip-Ties

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Pre Zip-Ties
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 08:33 pm:

What did people use before zip-ties (aka cable-ties)?

I'm re-doing wires on my 24 Touring...routing them where they most likely would've been originally.

I bought some wire loom clamps from Langs to hold the cloth-wrapped looms in place on the firewall but I sort of geek out on neatly routed wires once they leave the looms and go to their connections.

I haven't used any modern Phillips-head screws on this car and don't want to use zip-ties either.

I'm thinking maybe twine...or bailing wire?

Any other suggestions?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 09:55 pm:

Take a small rod drill bit whatever is about the size of the wire and a small piece of steel or brass fold it over and hammer it so the rod is in one end. Drill a hole thru both ends and you have a perfect sized piece to screw in somewhere


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 09:56 pm:

Black, heavy fishing twine?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Pharis on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 11:26 pm:

You could always tie em up with linen cord... If you've got the time and patience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Billing on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 04:18 am:

I recently replaced the original wiring in my T, and the original wiring at the timer was laced up with cord as in the above picture. A work of art indeed!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 05:57 am:

Interesting topic Don, and something I have wondered about. I too like my wiring nice and neat. I bought some plastic loops (P-clamps) to hold the wiring to the firewall before I knew better, and need to replace all those myself with something more correct.

I do sneak some zip-ties on areas that aren't easily seen, basically stuff that is under the vehicle that you would have to crawl under to see.

I look forward to the responses on this topic so I can correct my car also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 06:49 am:

The photo above is beautiful.

I think I'm going to give it a try....after all, there's really not that much wiring that'll need this treatment.

Now to find some linen cord.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 07:36 am:

That's how meat is tied for roasting in an oven. Are you a chef?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 07:51 am:

I'm definitely not a chef, but the "knot" looks simple enough. I'll be giving this a try.

I googled "linen cord" and it turns out it's really easy to find. Amazon has 50 yards of waxed Irish linen cord for less than $10.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 08:01 am:

Don't know the name of the series knot Kevin posted above but it is commonly used on small sail boats to hold the sail to the boom when it is lowered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 08:25 am:

There was the method shown...

And then there was just a running series of knots every three inches or so...

I believe that when loom was not used, the 'twine' was actually called 'waxed cord' to prevent moisture rot.

The version of knots I mention were simple...they were actually surgeon knots...

The original centrifuge built for the Project Mercury astronauts had a main cable that had 200 Pin Amphenol soldered connections and I want to say 10 wires to a sub-bundle with surgeon knots, then 5 sets again bound with surgeon knots, then 4 main knots, over-knotting the whole cable. The second set and the third set allowed the pitch dimension to be doubled with each bundling.

How to I know this? The cables were laid up over a long weekend using the hallways and saw-horses of the Naval Air Development Center outside Philadelphia. My father was the Chief Instrument Engineer for the Navy (having started at Brewster) and the honor and the 'pressure' to show by example fell to him to do ALL the knot ups that weekend while his techs did the solder-ups. Me as an 8 or 9 year old got to sit on a chair ALL weekend long (with breaks to go see the space animals at the holding 'zoo') and watch knot after knot be laid up in what seemed to be about 2 seconds a knot!

As an adult, when I got into a super HO layout...I was laying up all of the hand laced in wires with surgeon knots...Dad would have been proud...I would say I could do maybe 10 an hour...ha ha...after a few lay-ups I said enough of this and went and bought mini zip ties...

When I made the looms up for the Hack and its 4-ways/stop/turn (danged loom cloth was expensive) I thought of corded knots and then cheated...I took a whole bunch of shrink tubing 'sticks' and cut them maybe 3/16 wide like balony slices, added them every now and then along sub-lengths, used them just before a turn out junction, etc. and didn't feel guilty...they were all then covered with loom and I did weave in junctions being anal retentive about things...ha ha


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 08:38 am:

Kevin has it right.

Waxed linen cord, or waxed cotton thread. Period correct and used to bind up many many things; even used in the aircraft industry to keep things together.

You can find that material at craft shops such as Michaels in their jewelry section. I am sure that it can be found "on line". It is sometimes used for stringing beads and such. It comes in many colors. I think that white or brown would look right. Good luck with your project. Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Sims--Reed City,Mich. on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 09:18 am:

In reality, in the day, black cloth friction tape was used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 09:20 am:

Nice wiring treatment, Kevin! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 09:56 am:

We still use that cord today for lacing cables in the Telecom industry. If you know anyone that works for the telephone company they may have access to scrap rolls. When installations are done the installers use this, and there are usually leftover rolls without enough on them to keep, but enough for what you would need.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 10:03 am:

EVERYONE knows that duct tape was first invented as an upgrade for T owners!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 10:24 am:

If you want to try cable lacing, here is a link to a NavShips manual that shows how to start the lacing run, the proper knots to use and how to terminate the lacing.
http://archive.hnsa.org/doc/cabling/part5.htm

Restoration Supply has small rolls of the correct waxed linen cord available. Watch out buying the cord on line as some of it is not linen and is not waxed. It's not that hard to do after a few tries. A pair of small sharp snips or diagonal cutters is good to have on hand and about the only tool you will need.


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