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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: New to the model T community
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Dennis on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 10:59 pm:

I recently got a 1914 model T. I am a pretty mechanical guy and am looking to learn about my car and all about model T. Does anyone e have any advice for a rookie like myself? The car I have runs pretty good, it has been driven over the years and the car itself is not by any means a museum car. I've been driving it and really enjoy it and learning about it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 11:08 pm:

Welcome Kyle, ask away. The people here on this forum are the most knowledgeable you will ever find. Congrats on the new purchase. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 11:10 pm:

I see you live in St. Francis, MN.

Did you buy the car in Minnesota?

Does it have a low number Pioneer Plate (less than 2000)?

Erik in Minneapolis.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Dennis on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 11:22 pm:

The car came from forest city Iowa, it was my wife's grandfathers he owned it for a long time. It currently has Iowa plates. I am starting to look into transferring the car to my name and Minnesota.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Dennis on Sunday, June 04, 2017 - 11:24 pm:

The one question I do have is when I have the car on the magneto it seems to miss once and a while. I do have a full set of new coil boxes. I need to learn about this to see if something is dirty or maybe another issue


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 03:37 am:

Check the mag post.


Be gentle. It's easy to strip the threads.


Sometimes fuzz from the band linings collects on it. Your missing is likely due to something else, but this is a possibility that's easy to check.

Here's something you'll need: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html

I would ask the car's previous owner if this has been done: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG79.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Dennis on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 07:42 am:

I will check that thank you. The previous owner is in a nursing home, but his good friend knows all about what they have done to the car, I will be talking to him today. Thanks again


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 08:56 am:

Kyle,

When you stated "I do have a full set of new coil boxes" - meaning new as in reproductions or new as in "rebuilt" & by whom did they come from ? Not all "new coil boxes" are equal ! Could be a possible source for "the miss".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 09:21 am:

Kyle...as they say here, "welcome to the affliction". Also, might as well plan on one more! Seems hard to avoid. I started with one, within a year ended up with 5, now I'm down to "only" 3!! By all means, if the car didn't come with this book, get one! There's several other publications to help in the care and feeding of these, but this one's considered the "bible".
https://www.modeltford.com/item/T1.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 09:48 am:

Kyle
Remove the transmission cover to see if there is a oil filter screen in it. That's probably the best after market accessory that came out for Model Ts in the T era. If it. doesnt have one I would put one in it.
The vendors have them for about 30.00 dollars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 10:07 am:

Kyle, Two of the best tools you have when repairing/taking apart Model T assemblies is your cell phone and zip lock bags. Take lots of pictures during disassembly and put similar parts in labeled plastic bags. I am constantly amazed at how much I forget between disassembly and reassembly! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie Dill in Stamford, CT on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 10:16 am:

Michael - I wish I'd seen your zip lock bag comment a few months ago. I'd have way fewer nuts & bolts sitting around looking somewhat important and some of which I will have to spend some time identifying. One more thing I've learned on this forum.

The other thing I've learned is that while I love reading this forum and fiddling around with my T, I really should focus a little more on my day job. It's a great but challenging distraction to my real life productivity. Oh well...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 10:48 am:

Another method that supplements the ziploc bag is to loosely re-assemble sub-assemblies and nuts & bolts after cleaning and painting while their relationship is fresh in your mind. That way there is no doubt about which nuts go onto which bolts. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 11:08 am:

Welcome Kyle. Hope to see you (and Dick's old car) in Farmington this coming weekend?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 11:09 am:

All the nuts, bolts and small parts can get even more confusing if you happen to be working on multiple cars at the same time. I keep my Model T and Model A right next to each other in the barn and use red zip locks for one and blue zip locks for the other! Luckily almost no parts are interchangeable....:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 01:49 pm:

As you've been operating the car, you've already licked the most daunting problem of all first-time Model T owners; that is learning to drive the thing. _The rest is about care and feeding. One of the jokes I like to tell about Model T ownership is, If it's loose, tighten it; if it creaks, oil it; if it squeaks, grease it; if it scrapes, shim it; if it rattles, adjust it; if it's wet, wipe it; if it's dry, polish it; if it drips... Oh. No, that's normal; leave it alone.

Though a tongue-in-cheek comment, the above is realistic in the sense that a Tin Lizzie really does require a lot of adjusting, tinkering and lubrication, and frequent routine maintenance is just part of the therapeutic experience of owning such a machine.

But for now, let's go over the immediate concerns:

Brakes
The Model T Ford has about the same braking capability as the Titanic. _Braking effectiveness is enhanced by gritting one's teeth and opening one's eyes as wide as possible—and if that's only a legend, I can't understand why at one time or another, all Flivver drivers have employed this technique. _As originally configured by Mr. Ford, your brake pedal squeezes a fabric-lined band around a rotating drum in your transmission, the braking impulse being transmitted down the length of the drive-shaft to the differential from whence it is distributed to whichever rear wheel has the least traction—a principle charmingly explained by Marissa Tomei in the movie, "My Cousin Vinnie":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFdJza0AbeA

This means, for the most part, your braking impulse—what's left of it by the time it reaches one rear wheel—is being transmitted to the road by a tire with a footprint the size of a shot-glass.

Unfortunately, that's not the end of the story. _See, as originally configured by Mr. Ford, the gearing of the differential is held in mesh by a thrust washer made of babbitt. _Typically, babbitt thrust washers, sooner or later, can be found, in pieces, at the bottom of the differential casing and when they crumble like that, the connection between your brake-pedal and your differential is lost—and so is your ability to stop the car. _Okay, okay; maybe that's not 100% true. _There's still the parking brake, but there's a reason it's called a parking brake and not an emergency brake. _That is because, as originally configured by Mr. Ford, the parking brake shoes are not lined with any particular type of brake material, but are plain, naked steel shoes, much better at generating sparks than they are at slowing the car down._The point is, if you're not absolutely certain your differential has bronze thrust washers and you have no auxiliary brakes (like Rocky Mountain Brakes), you need to address the possibility of this hazard.

But take heart, for if your Model T has been equipped with aftermarket Rocky Mountain Brakes (as evidenced by impressive-looking 15-inch drums and external, fabric-lined bands on the rear wheels), your braking ability has been improved dramatically from abominable to poor. _You see, even if you were to transfer a set of hydraulic, double-disc brakes from a Lamborghini to your Flivver's rear wheels, you're still dealing with such laughable traction as can be gotten out of a pair of skinny high-pressure tires. _So, braking capability will never be your Tin Lizzie's greatest attribute unless you equip it with retro-rockets or dragster parachutes (Oh, speaking of parachutes, your car will stop just a little bit better with the top up as opposed to down).

Crankshaft
Your crankshaft, where it counts, is only an inch thick and likely as not, it's about one-hundred years old. _This is the Model T Ford's very fragile Achilles heel. _So don't lug the engine up-hill. _Downshift instead. _And don't be too aggressive with the throttle.

In short, drive as though your crankshaft and brakes were made of pie-crust.

Timer
Whenever your engine starts skipping beats or running rough, the first thing you're going to do is clean your timer. _That's because, as originally configured by Mr. Ford, the roller-timer is a troublesome pain in the neck—so much so that countless manufacturing companies have made considerable profit-making enterprise of the after-marketing of their own version of Ford's pig of a timer.



There's the Tiger Timer, the Anderson Timer, the Crystal Timer, the New Day Timer, the Kitchen Timer—okay, there isn't really a Kitchen Timer—but if you're going to replace your Ford Roller-Timer, the new TW Timer is generally thought of as one of the very best and comes highly recommended by a lot of knowledgeable folk. _Seriously, when your engine mis-fires or skips fire, cleaning and lubing your roller-timer is the quickest, easiest and least expensive remedy to apply—and if that doesn't do the trick, there's still no harm in having a nice, clean timer.

Beautiful Women



Your Model T Ford is a people-magnet and half of those people will be women. _If you happen to be single, this works even better than having a puppy on a leash. _If you're married, be a good boy and appreciate your wife who tolerates your ownership of a practically useless horseless carriage which, instead of her modern car, occupies the place of honor in the garage. _I once visited with a Model T owner who, from a position flat on his back under the car, reached a hand out and said, "Honey, gimme a 9/16ths?" _And she did it. _He is a happy man. _She is a treasure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 02:39 pm:

Welcome Kyle, I met Kyle a couple of years ago and spent some time with him in Forest City, IA over Memorial Day weekend this year. Emily and I have been camping on the property of Kyle's wife's grampa Dick Thompson who we have known for 25 years. Gary Ludwig was teaching Kyle how to drive it that weekend and he took off like a veteran driver. Kyle is a young man with a 2 year old son and we are very happy to see more young blood getting into the hobby. Dick's 14 definitely is going to a good home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 03:08 pm:

Bob, Your writing ability is outstanding. This little piece you just entered above could be titled "Advice for a New Model T Owner" and it would make a really good article for The Vintage Ford.

Have you ever considered writing an article for our magazine? I think it would be very well received.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 03:18 pm:

Actually, he did. It was about Model T tires. As usual, well-written. Also well-researched. I think of Bob as our best writer, but then I think of Stan Howe, who is no slouch either. Bob's piece about going to school with the nuns is an absolute gem, and Stan's book of Model T adventures is a delight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 07:41 pm:

Hey Kyle, when do we get to see a pic of your new T? :-)
Great to see you here!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 10:03 pm:

Kyle: As most of the guys have stated the Black Model T Service Book is a MAJOR must have.I was told to read it forward and backward, and you will still miss something going both ways. I think I have three copies, one here at the computer one in the shop and shelf and one on the bench..
I just finished re-installing the Ruckstell in my depot hack, boy what fun! because of a broken axle. Then a flat tire and then adjusting the brakes(Rocky Mtn) after a complete tear down. Now I am ready for a brake test and hope all works as it is supposed to.

So now get your car so it is SAFE to drive and enjoy the ride as they are fun and can be a little bit of hassle.
As one of the Forum Members has said many times "GO OUT AND ENJOY THE RIDE!

Look at my profile and you will see my current project!!!!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Dennis on Monday, June 05, 2017 - 11:37 pm:

DEREK,

I may be down in Farmington this weekend, I am on call at work and am trying to get someone to cover Sunday for me. I will plan ahead in the future

Steve,

The coil boxes are rebuilt and they came from My wife's grandfather. I will get more information on them soon, forgive me I am a rookie! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Dennis on Tuesday, June 06, 2017 - 12:00 am:

DEREK,

I may be down in Farmington this weekend, I am on call at work and am trying to get someone to cover Sunday for me. I will plan ahead in the future

Steve,

The coil boxes are rebuilt and they came from My wife's grandfather. I will get more information on them soon, forgive me I am a rookie! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, June 06, 2017 - 12:14 am:

Minnesota being a hotbed of Model T activity, I expect somebody nearby will have a set of coils, known to be good, that you can try in your car and see if they make a difference. If they do, then you can get yours fixed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kyle Dennis on Tuesday, June 06, 2017 - 12:26 am:

I really appreciate all the comments and look forward to the adventure that will be owning this awesome car. I am eager to learn and make this car last another 103 years!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, June 06, 2017 - 12:27 am:

Lovely machine you've got there, Kyle. -Enjoy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, June 06, 2017 - 07:28 am:

Kyle,

Great looking 1914! Welcome to the hobby and the forum.

One addition to what Steve and others have cautioned you about on the rear axle thrust washers also sometimes called thrust bearings - Ford part number 2528 (Steve's: I would ask the car's previous owner if this has been done: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG79.html ). If you car still has the original rear axle thrust washers that it came with, then they are already brass. Ford switched to the babbit rear axle thrust washers during 1915 production (ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/P-R.htm#rax3 see part number 2528).

I also encourage folks to read the safety cautions related to their new Ford. Please see the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/576808.html Like the horse it replaced the T and the horse both have some known safety issues that if you are aware of them, you won't get bitten by them or kicked by them.

And it won't be but 4 or so more years and your now 2 year old maybe able to start your T. That's how my Dad got me hooked on Ts years ago. When you have some extra time between now and then -- please see the posting "Do You Believe coils sing different songs? Mine do" at http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/10844.html

Again welcome to the forum and the hobby!

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Tuesday, June 06, 2017 - 08:55 pm:

Nice Ford!


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