Be careful of your Head lamps

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Be careful of your Head lamps
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Thursday, June 08, 2017 - 05:57 am:

As mentioned in a prior posting, a headlamp bracket breaking can be a real disaster. In my case it was a 14'' tall baled Neverout lamp, one of an original matched pair I gave a chunk of money for several years ago. A lamp this size, especially a pair are quite difficult to find. Anyway I ran them on my Curved Dash Olds, I had 1/4'' thick steel brackets they were mounted on and was at a show, we had driven around for about 20 minutes and decided to load up and head home. I was running about 15mph and the left headlamp mount weld broke and dropped the lite to the roadway. Of course I ran over it. To say I was sick is an understatement. I actually set this car up to vibrate, parade goers love the shake and rattle of a brass era car. Unfortunately my headlamp brackets fatigued and cracked, causing my heartache. Well I picked up the pieces and headed home. I didn't even look at the light for a couple of weeks I was so upset. ha Since I'm retired and funds to replace my car items are tight I knew I had to repair the lamp the best I could. I annealed the brass to make it workable and picked and reshaped the lamp door until it was a reasonable facsimile of the original shape. Then I sanded it smooth on the outside with progressively finer paper until I could polish it with Blue Magic. I ordered a new pair of 6'' Domed lenses, (both have to be replaced to match). For the lamp body I did what I could short of unsoldering it which is beyond my abilities. My advice to one and all- when driving your car on tour use a nylon wire tie to ''safety'' connect your lamps to the car. If a bracket breaks, it won't be run over and be damaged or ruined. They can be clipped right off when displaying or added quickly and cheaply when setting off on tour.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daniel Snell on Thursday, June 08, 2017 - 07:15 am:

Gary, Thank you for sharing your unfortunate experience with us, we can all learn from this I am sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Thursday, June 08, 2017 - 07:32 am:

Wow! You did a GREAT job bringing that door back to life! I know exactly how much work goes into taking those dings out and admire your craftsmanship, patients and resolve. I would like to say; Keep up the great work, but I hope you don't have to go through that again. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Thursday, June 08, 2017 - 08:58 am:

Great job, Gary. Thanks for posting this message.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Thursday, June 08, 2017 - 04:38 pm:

Thanks, just trying to keep someone else from heart ache. Some on here have such nice cars, it would be a shame to see someone go thru what I did. Gary


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Friday, June 09, 2017 - 01:09 pm:

How about contacting a good musical instrument repair shop? I've owned an antique baritone and cornet. Bought them cheap as they were dented and abused. A local music shop repaired them - took all the dents out but it required "unsoldering" them.


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