Model t era facts

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Model t era facts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Friday, June 09, 2017 - 07:31 pm:

I'm going to a cruise night tomorrow evening and am looking for some of the fun facts on the era that I've seen here or elsewhere. I can't seem to find them on the search engine. I remember something about how few homes had a telephone, indoor plumbing, automobile, high school education, etc. Any help to put together a fun list I can display is appreciated. Noel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, June 09, 2017 - 09:06 pm:

http://www.thepeoplehistory.com/20sfood.html

https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/fast_facts/1920_fast_fact s.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, June 09, 2017 - 09:58 pm:

I like something Dallas Landers said when looking at a worn set of tires on a old T he said those tires were wore so thin he could see the air in them!! Do you have a Ford Joke book on hand? If you can get your Tin Lizzie to start free?? Speaking of the telephone,any remember the party line which was no party? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 12:14 am:

Along with the wonderfully low prices, include the not-so-wonderful wages. Yeah, I paid 5¢ for a snickers or a Baby Ruth, 10¢ for a Birely's strawberry soda, and 25¢ for the Sunday matinee that included two features, several cartoons, a newsreel, a comedy short, and a serial. I also worked Saturdays mostly pushing a broom, sunup to sundown, for $3. That's about 25¢ an hour. In 1949 my uncle made $1800 a year teaching blacksmithing and welding at Chilocco. The superintendent, a PhD, made $3000.

http://libraryguides.missouri.edu/pricesandwages/1920-1929

Major events:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1923_in_the_United_States


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 01:07 am:

-Noel-
These were a Forum thread from a couple years ago. Perhaps they're what you're looking for.
Marv
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/461535.html?1407097935


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 08:41 am:

Speaking of the not so wonderful wages,Ford set the world on it's head in 1914 and most thought he was nut's!! On the other hand in the fine print?? Bud.PS,Much about the times,the Ford's [Henry and the car's],the world in Tin Lizzie by Stern!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Monday, June 12, 2017 - 01:45 pm:

I had a fun night Saturday. One of the local dealers opens up his lot after moving the vehicles to the Mall and folks park their cars or projects there and answer questions. There must have been over 100 cars of all types, old trucks, Hot rods, a dragster, and restored older cars. I think my '20 and '23 were the oldest, aside from a "1903 Cadillac" made up from various old parts and some not bad wood work. I had several youngsters sit in the drivers seats, honk horns, push pedals, and produce large smiles! The 20 gave numerous free starts and several rides. Total cost=$0, Model T exposure= Priceless.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Sommers on Monday, June 12, 2017 - 05:46 pm:

Noel,
Here are some facts that I use for my '13 Touring.

The 1913 Model ‘T’
The Tesla of 100 Years Ago

This car was built 104 years ago, in April of 1913. It is 98% original, and is in great working order. The car goes about 25 miles on a gallon of gasoline. It has a top speed of 40 miles per hour (on a good day, going downhill, with the wind at your back). The biggest change to this car is the addition of modern disk brakes. The braking of the Model T is notoriously bad, and as my wife says, “Safety Trumps Authenticity”. Additionally, there were things about the Model T that was lacking, as compared to today’s standards;

Unlike Modern Cars, The Model T did NOT have;
A water pump
An oil pump
An oil filter
A gas gauge
A gas pump
A generator
A battery
A starter (it uses an “Armstrong Starter”)
A heater
A radio (Don’t even ask about a stereo, CD, DVD player or a USB port…)
Air conditioning
Electric Lights
Brake Lights
Electric Turn Signals (You Used Your Hands)
An air filter
A speedometer
Power brakes
Power steering
A trunk
Side windows
A spare tire

However, it DID have;
A gas tank under the front seat
Three foot pedals, one hand lever, two adjustment levers, a fuel regulator, and a choke
A container that held water and calcium carbide. When mixed, acetylene gas (C2H2) is produced which was piped to the headlights, and lit with a match
A hand operated windshield wiper
A rubberized canvas top that required two people to open and close
An overgrown bicycle horn
An all leather interior
White tires- originally the tires were the natural color of rubber which is white/tan
A tail light and the side lamps that were fueled with kerosene

The cost of a 1913 Model T Touring car in 1913- $600
In todays’ dollars, that’s about $15,000

That famous quote, “You can have any color as long as it’s black”, was not true. This car was originally painted a dark blue at the factory. It was not until 1914 that Ford introduced the assembly line, and mandated that all cars be painted black, to simplify and speed up the production process.
Drivers used to hang a cow bell to the front axle of their cars, as horses were used to that sound. As cars came down the roads the bell would clang, and it was assumed that the horse would be "less frightened"
Kingsford Charcoal: Model T’s have a wood frame under the sheet metal. Henry Ford did not want the wood scraps go to waste so he turned them into charcoal. The Kingsford Company was formed by Henry Ford and his nephew, named E. G. King. Kingsford charcoal was originally called Ford Charcoal.

Approximately 15 Million Model T’s were produced between 1909 and 1927. Unfortunately, the vast majority of them were scrapped, melted down, and used to produce steel for World War II.


In 1913, when this car was built...
The average worker made between $200 and $500 per year.
A first-class postage stamp cost 2 cents.
More than 96% of births took place at home.
US population was 95 million.
Eggs cost 14 cents per dozen.
The leading causes of death were pneumonia, influenza, tuberculosis, and diarrhea
Gasoline used for cars was originally sold in drug stores.
Less than 20% of homes had a bathtub.
Only 10% of homes had a telephone.
The population of Las Vegas, Nevada was 30.
Crossword puzzles, canned beer, sliced bread, and iced tea hadn’t yet been invented.
There was no Mother’s Day or Father’s Day.
Only 10% of US adults could read this poster.
Only 6% of all Americans had graduated from high school.
There were only about 230 reported murders nationwide.

--------------------------------------------

This car was being driven…
97 years before the last flight of the Space Shuttle (2011)
73 Years before the Iraq War started
62 Years prior to the end of the Viet Nam War
56 Years before Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the Moon (1969)
50 years before President John F. Kennedy was assassinated (1963)
28 years before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor (1941)
16 years before Charles Lindbergh flew the Spirit of St. Louis, solo, from New York to Paris (1927)
11 years before anybody ever heard of King Tutankhamen
4 years before the United States entered World War One (1917)
1 year after the Titanic sank (1912)
10 years after the Wright Brothers flew the first powered airplane (1903)
46 years after the Civil War ended (1865)



When Henry Ford died in 1947, he had amassed a great fortune. When measured in todays’ dollars, he was worth 188 Billion dollars


Regards,
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Monday, June 12, 2017 - 06:48 pm:

thank you, Mike and all of you. I'll copy this and save it for future events. Noel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 10:48 am:

Michael, you could add to your list that the Model T didn't have wheel brakes, instead using a transmission brake.

Garnet


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