Last T-100 Built

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Last T-100 Built
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 07:47 am:

When was the last T-100 built and what was its engine serial number (VIN)?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 08:38 am:

All six were built for the 2003 Ford Celebration.

#6 would be T-106
All blocks for the T-100 cars have casting date code of 06-06-03. The start date of Ford Motor Co.


Here is an old post with recap

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/24998.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 08:47 am:

Dan,Thank you for the link and it was great to see some of the old post/posters! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 09:45 am:

I remember reading on a Ford website that all parts on the T-100 cars were of new manufacture, but all would interchange with original T parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 10:18 am:

Hi John,

Not all of the parts used are reproductions. All of the ignition coils are original. I think that all of the lamps are original and possibly a few additional bits.

Not all of the parts will interchange. The gear profiles used for the transmission gears are different and therefore will not interchange.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 10:56 am:

Seems the engineers decided to improve the T-100 transmissions by making the triple gears with helical teeth.

Not only did they not sound like a model t transmission, the gears did not last very long. They then went back to the drawing board and redid the transmission with original design straight cut triple gears and they are still running well today. Quite possibly this was Henry's revenge for trying to improve the Universal car?

In fact the T-100 cars are running around Greenfield village hauling passengers daily with Henry's original designed gear set.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 11:53 am:

I had the pleasure of driving a T-100 when it was just about brand-new. It was a strange experience. The car was tight -- no rattles, no body noise -- and quiet. I imagine it was like driving a brand new Model T back in 1914. Very unique experience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Fenrich on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 12:31 pm:

When I went to Greenfield in 2012, age 15, the weather was spectacular and the site was not very busy. On that day, they had I believe 6 different T's out, including 2 T-100's.

I was chatting with the attendant conducting the ride, and at the time, an original 1914 T pulled in, as well as a T-100. He asked me which one was the original one, and if I was right, me and my dad could ride in our choice of the T's there. I correctly identified the original (had a Boyce motometer in place of the radiator cap), and of course, I chose to ride in the original. That was quite the confidence boost for 15 year old me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

If I remember correctly the engine pans were not able to be reproduced


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 08:07 pm:

The pans were made, but the engineers had a difficult time.

Excerpt from article back in 2003:

Of some 750 parts, more than 500 were avail
able through catalogs that serve the huge Model
T hobbyist market. The car guys had to figure out
how to make the rest. the toughest part: the
crankcase.

The Model T bodies, which are wood with a
sheet-metal overlay, came from Sweden. The rims
were made in Cadillac, MI. An Amish craftsman in
Canada put together the wooden wheels.
The Ford transmission plant in Livonia, MI made
much of the power train with the help of
diagrams and original parts.

To re-create the Model T engine, Ford took an
original motor to an out-of-state Air Force base,
where technicians used a CAT scan to take an
image. Using that data, experts at the University
of Michigan made a 3D computer model. Ford
produced patterns, and Northfield
Manufacturing in Westland, MI turned out castings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 09:51 pm:

T-100 is a Toyota, right ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 11:02 pm:

Burger, did you forget your meds today??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 11:20 pm:

Yea Hamburger,I forgot for a minute and thought that someone was asking a Toy yoda question. A buddy has 2 T 100 pickups that need parts swapped from 1 to the other to make 1 good 1. thought about asking if they were for sale. Like I need another project.

When i went on my trip to the Henry Ford and Greenfeild I rode in the front seat of 1 of the T 100's . Kinda cramped but at the time I had not drove my own T yet and was wanting to watch and learn. It was odd to look in spots in corners and such where you forget to hide a rust pit when you do body work and there Was none!
.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 08:20 am:

I Has surely been asked.... did the HFM keep ownership of the block castings? One would hope these blocks would be made available to the public.......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 11:01 am:

HFM didn't do this project, it was Ford Motor Co. public relations, and was funded by Ford. According to great article in May/June 2001 Model T Times..a plan and budget was presented to Ford management. The requirement was one new concept 1914 to be delivered Nov 2000 for Ford approval. From there the decision was by Ford to make only 6. Rumors were that Ford would make many more and sell the New T's to the public. Nope.

A tiny core of people did the whole development works, lead by a Ford engineering employee as point man for the Ford directed activities.

If there are any tooling left, its Ford's property and likely no one will ever see these T-100 parts again.

With a visit to Greenfield Village, and tour in and talking to the Model T maintainers who keep the village T's running for tourist rides, the T-100s there are repaired with new parts sourced as we hobbyist do.

Here are some shots from inside the maintenance building for the vehicles running at Greenfield.



Spare parts



And T-100 # 2 getting its service, note the chart records kept on each of the vehicles! I need to do the same for my tiny fleet :-)





Rear axle bearings getting attention on #2.





The T's at Greenfield are likely the most driven Model T's in a year ever :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 12:57 pm:

Interesting, if I'm reading the list right, one project is to replace both front fenders??
I also notice Rocky Mountain Brakes added, and the "axle bearing" picture shows them on.
Notice in the first building picture the rails in the floor (guy on left side has one foot on a rail); the building was used for railroad maintenance originally.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 01:27 pm:

Also note that the list says "repack timer"! Royce would be proud. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike-Iowa on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 01:40 pm:

I still have one of the T-100 Touring bodies in its crate, need to get that project going sometime.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 05:38 pm:

Here's a better view , and one of the 'other' 1914's Shop Records of Service needs

Could have stayed and talked to the staff for a long time, but the tour had to move on. Learned most of the T's issues are from the volunteer drivers, who mostly learn on the job, and some don't have the "ear" it takes to know when something on the T is amiss. So some are driven days with poor linings, and other problems.

The T's are driven mostly in low speed, long idling, and overloaded too boot! Cooling and battery recharge for electric start T's are issues, from running so slow.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 09:24 pm:

Some comments:

There is still tooling existing for the chassis of T-100 as well as several patterns for various castings. I saw them in the process of searching for other equipment. Ford is aware of the tools existence and they have inventoried what's there. They may offer them to the reproduction suppliers someday, but this is only a guess on my part.

The triple gears were cut as spur gears but they had a modified tooth profile that almost resembled the teeth on timing sprockets. They have been replaced with original parts donated to the Village garage.

These are my personal observations and opinions and I do not represent or speak for Ford Motor Company or the Henry Ford.


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