Drive shaft bushing help???

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Drive shaft bushing help???
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren- Huntington, VT on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 10:24 pm:

I have installed two new bronze drive shaft bushings and each time, the bushing is too tight for the drive shaft...

I fit the bushing over the drive shaft prior to installation and it fits perfect. I put the bushing in the freezer and heated the tube with a torch to get it hot for the installation. I lined up the oil groove where it needed to be, and it took about 6-7 taps with a hammer to get the bushing into place. I then drilled the oil hole and used a small file to take off any sharp edges that may have created an issue.

Both times the driveshaft won't slide into the bushing. I tried to force it and it is really tight... What am I doing wrong? Is there any way to fix it without buying another bushing??? I'm afraid if I try to hone out the bushing I won't do it evenly and it will create problems in the future...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 10:33 pm:

They have to be reamed and faced after they are installed. The face has to be cut down some to be able to install the rivet to lock the u-joint to shaft and yes that step has to be done to keep the pinion from traveling back even if the fun project kit is installed. Not doing this step will put the U-joint out of the correct center rotation plain.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren- Huntington, VT on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 11:06 pm:

I faced the bushing prior to installation so that once installed, the hole in the u-joint would line up correctly with the hole in the drive shaft. I did it exactly the same way on the last rear end I rebuilt, but for some reason this one is giving me trouble...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 11:16 pm:

When you drive the bushing in it mushrooms out the end of the hole.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 11:23 pm:


You can get very lucky and find reamers at an auction, or you can spend a lot more and buy them new, or you can take the job to a local machine shop. The same goes for spindle pin, hand crank, and spring & shackle bushings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JD, Wichita, KS on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 11:32 pm:

Use a brake cylinder hone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 - 12:11 am:

I used the epoxy trick to avoid having to buy expensive tools to use very few times.
First I fit the bushing to the axle, then I turn it down on the outside so it's a slip fit in the tube. (Can be done with a sinple fixture holding the bushing in a drill press and a file if you haven't got any lathe)
Then it's time to test and file the thickness of the flange - easy to check in the tube, then pull it out for further adjustment. When it fits right, clean everything and glue the bushing in place with your favorite epoxy, using the drive shaft as a guide.

This method can also be used for the spindle bushings - and the rear cam shaft bushing (though I haven't tried the method on the cam shaft personally)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 - 10:01 am:

I'm with Roger. Have used the same method in all three places, rear cam bushing, spindle bushings and DS bushing. No problems to report over many years use. To keep things in place while the glue is setting up, install the ujoint and pin. All it takes to remove the bushing is heating with a welding torch and the epoxy disintegrates.
At first I was concerned about using the method on the cam bushing thinking the heat of the engine oil might compromise the epoxy. But after an internet search I found the glue was stable to over 400 degrees F.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 - 01:20 pm:

Michael W.,

You aren't doing anything wrong. You're just not done yet. You need to ream the I.D. of the bushing after installation. It's bushing installation 101 that the hole in a bushing will collapse a bit when pressed into an assembly.


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