Problem Solver Needed!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Problem Solver Needed!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 02:47 pm:

Below is a somewhat home-made polisher.

The motor is 1725 rpm, 1HP, 115/230VAC. Currently (no pun intended!) it's either fully on, or off.

Now, picture in your mind a sewing machine. Your foot rests on a floor mounted device that functions very much the same as an accelerator pedal in a modern car. The further you press it, the faster the engine runs.

With the sewing machine, the more you press it, the faster the sewing machine runs.

What I'm looking for is the same thing for the below motor so I can control the speed with my foot while both hands can hold brass pieces to polish.

Any help as to where I can find it would be appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Dillinger - Charlotte, MI on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 03:00 pm:

You might check with Rockler; they supply foot pedals for things like router tables and drill presses. They might have an off-the-shelf solution for your need.

If not, why not cut up an actual sewing machine pedal? Depending on the load of the motor, of course, I see no reason why one couldn't be made to work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 03:14 pm:

Get yourself a VFD (variable frequency drive) from eBay and elsewhere to run the motor and wire a 10K pot to the vfd to control motor speed between 0-60 hz. Some have more features than others - slow ramp-up and ramp-down etc. Pick one according to yer horsepower range and voltage input.

Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 03:57 pm:

Not sure how that will work at low speed with a capacitor start motor. Better to use a VFD along with a 3 phase motor IMO.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 04:59 pm:

Make up an arbor for the buffer so you can chuck it up in your lathe. Then you can run it at a whole bunch of different speeds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By william matz Beloit, Wi on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 05:27 pm:

Try a light dimmer switch,
home depot, lowes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 08:36 pm:

Only certain types of electric motors can be run as variable speed. AC and DC, different kinds of "start" circuits, multi speed/torque windings, all make a difference. I will not try to tell which ones will work, because quite frankly, I don't know as much about them as I think I do. (Being a bit facetious, but do not want to give bad advice.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 09:26 pm:

Dan MC has it right, you need a three phase motor and a VFD, and you'll be set foot pedal optional. Dave in Bellingham,WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 09:50 pm:

Commercial sewing machine motors can be had in 110 single phase, they use a clutch that controls the speed by pedal pressure, usually around a horse or two. Tread mill motors are repurposed for a lot of different things too, plenty videos on you tube. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:50 pm:

That looks like a multi speed motor as used on fans or furnaces, if so just get a three way switch and it should slow down a lot.


Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 11:02 pm:

Your motor is a constant speed AC unit. To vary the speed you will need to vary the frequency, not likely to be economically accomplished. To work like a sewing machine you will need a universal motor. Its speed will vary with voltage. Get you a decent size AC drill motor and adapt the speed control from the unit to a foot pedal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 11:47 pm:

Bill, I'm an engineering student and problem solving is in my blood. What you want seems very logical and reasonable, yet, no one makes it. No one. I have googled high and low. The best answer I have found so far is to take a large, variable speed corded drill and then cut it up and mount the motor where you want, and then wire up the switch into your own foot pedal.

Better yet! I had a better idea: http://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/polishers-shears-and-nibblers/7--9-va riable-speed-polisher-with-soft-start/dwp849x

You can make your own pedal and incorporate the on/off switch and the speed variation. You may have to tweak the end of the shaft a little so you can mount the wheel you want. I think this is very doable. It'll take some fabrication but I'm confident this will work. I have this exact buffer it'll go really slow and really fast and the motor is strong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Gilham Bellflower Ca. on Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 11:58 pm:

Industrial sewing machine motor. smooth, quiet and variable speed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Doris, AZ on Friday, June 16, 2017 - 03:03 am:

1 hp permanent magnet DC motor with speed control.

Speed control input 120 VAC output 90 VDC. Speed controller varies the voltage to control the speed. I use a 1 hp Leeson permanent magnet DC motor and Minarik speed control for a lathe spindle motor. Have used this setup for 30 years with no problems.

(Message edited by AzBob on June 16, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, June 16, 2017 - 01:09 pm:

My recent buffing was along the lines Seth suggested, but I didn't take the time to make it a stationary setup with a pedal control.


For a large, stationary object like a radiator, the drill works fine.


I think it looks OK for 102 years old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Friday, June 16, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

.First I would get a known good 240 volt three phase 4 pole motor and build my "machine". Then get a 240 volt VFD rated at twice the motor HP. You can then run your machine on 240 volts single phase household source. You can program the VFD to control almost endless functions, speed direction torque etc. This is by far the best way to go. All the other methods mentioned have drawbacks. The next best solution is the afore mentioned DC motor and controller which is more expensive and not so versatile, however they can be ordered to operate from 120VOLT. Foot control of VFD is ultra simple.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JD, Wichita, KS on Friday, June 16, 2017 - 02:48 pm:

This router control from Harbor Freight works good for what you want to do.

https://www.harborfreight.com/router-speed-control-43060.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, June 16, 2017 - 03:18 pm:

Think it's best to keep a constant speed when buffing.

Buffing speed is dependent on the wheel diameter.
Have buffed brass with a Baldor unit, 10" wheel, and motor ran at 3400 RPM or so. You want to keep constant SFPM on the metal part, or you won't be happy with the result.

Caswell's site gives a good primer on buffing metal.

http://www.caswellplating.com/buffman.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coco - Winchester Va. on Friday, June 16, 2017 - 04:36 pm:

Older sewing machines, as mentioned, use a belt drive from a clutch assembly, and your foot pressure varies clutch engagement.

More modern sewing machines use servo motors, which are controlled electronically, you can program to do one stitch at a time or a continuous run.

The problem with either to run a polish wheel is, I believe, one of speed/rpm. To polish you need high rpm.

Be careful. One of the most dangerous tools in a shop can be a high speed buffing wheel, catching the edge of a piece of metal.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Friday, June 16, 2017 - 05:10 pm:

Sorry .....

Misread the title.

Thought it said " Problem Starter Needed ".

Was gonna recommend the ex-wife .....


Freighter Jim


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