I Saw Model T #10739 at the Auto World Museum in Fulton, MO today

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: I Saw Model T #10739 at the Auto World Museum in Fulton, MO today
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

I drove to Columbia, MO this morning to check out a Mopar show. After the show, I decided to stop in Fulton, MO to check out the Auto World Museum, which has a total of 75 vehicles on display ranging from a 1903 Humberette to a 1982 DeLorean.

The museum displays the collection of William E. Backer, who made his fortune selling Backer potato chips. He has passed, but his daughter and some associates are doing what they can to keep the museum alive.

One of the cars on display was billed as a 1909 Model T Ford, serial #10739. The hood was not open, so I couldn't take any pictures of the engine, but I did take many other pictures, shown below. The headlights were JNO 15s. The running boards were steel and had the full length ribs. One thing that caught my eye is that the oil pan appeared to have an inspection pan with bolts, so there are probably many more discrepencies. Enjoy the pictures and feel free to pick away at the car! :-)

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 06:01 pm:

I'm not really knowledgeable about the early Ts, but my 1927 has wooden wheels and I have no reason to believe that they were replacements for steel wire wheels. I don't think that steel wire wheels were ever standard on an American Model T. Probably an option, though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warwick Landy Traralgon Australia on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 06:12 pm:

Thanks for sharing Mark. Things that I can see that are incorrect for the year are as follows. Wrong radiator, wrong mixture control screw, coil box switch, differential, sump. The diff, radiator and sump are all quite unique parts which are big features of these early cars. a pity they are missing. the upholstery is very nice and good for reference.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 06:18 pm:

Here are scans of the museum flyer.

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 06:29 pm:

And the wrong front axle and spindles.
Can't figure out the rear axle - maybe it's a 1915-17 axle that has been remodeled to simulate an early look? The inner grease cups were never used on model T's as far as I know, maybe someone who had seen a picture in a reprint of the 1908 advance catalog thought it was used in early production?

And John, steel wire wheels were standard on closed cars late in 1927 production. First on Fordors, later on Tudors and Coupes. The change came on different dates for different assembly branches.
http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/doc27.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 06:31 pm:

I think Mr. Backer was an in-law of John Danuser.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 06:31 pm:

Doesn't look to have an open valve block based on your shots from underneath. Still a very neat car, likely with significant 1910 attributes. Thanks for sharing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 06:52 pm:

10739 is a 1910 model according to Bruce McCalley.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 06:56 pm:

my pile looks better all the time. ha,ha. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 08:12 pm:

Charley S, After the last few RIDICULOUS eBad offerings getting bid into the absurd zone, I would have thought you had sold that pile by now? I guess there is nobody left with both money and brains.

Of course, one could argue that if one had money AND brains, they would never fool around with this old junk in the first place. But I always thought that was what passions and caring about history and heritage was all about.

This one looks like a fine car for a museum. I am very pleased that the family is trying to continue it in memory of the man that collected these cars. Way too many private collections have gone the way of the winds in recent decades. While that creates opportunities for big money collectors to pick up prime pieces for their personal collections, it is also sad that an individual's life's work should blow away. A business, and money to divide among heirs is wonderful. But preserving what a person was passionate about not making money is a much greater honor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vieux Carre on Sunday, June 18, 2017 - 09:52 pm:

Wife and I went there. They asked us if we wanted the lights turned on.
Vern
1909 T, Fulton MO


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