Distrubtor vs coil's

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Distrubtor vs coil's
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Monday, June 19, 2017 - 10:54 pm:

i'm about to find out for myself if teragurtha, runs better on her coil,s or the distributor.I built a coil tester from instructions on the forum.[a fun project]. coil,s are ready, in reading information about the 600, there is resister shown in the information,I've had no luck finding one,is there a modern one that will take its place? what would be the voltage reduction. the dist system is easy to hook up so it will first to try. I'm useing a 9 volt battery.for this system.1921 t. thank you for your help Greg.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 10:23 am:

I don't quite understand your questions. But I will answer what I think you are asking.

The Model T came from the factory with coils and a magneto. If the magneto is in good condition the car will run very well on coils. If the magneto is not working, it will still run on battery, but not have quite as much power as it does on magneto. All the above assumes that your coils are in good adjustment. Some owners use a 12 volt battery which will allow the coils to build up current a bit faster than the 6 volt battery.

If the magneto is not in working condition or is non existant (some owners remove the magneto) the distributor will probably work a bit better than the coils.

With the above said, it all depends on whether you want the car to be more like Henry Ford made it, or you want to modify it. The choice is yours.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:11 am:

NORM,I POSTED USEING A 9 VOLT BATTERY,MY MISTAKE, IT IS 8 VOLT.battery,the INFORMATION I NEED TO FIND OUT IS A RESISTER NEEDED IN THE DISTRIBUTOR HOOK UP,? CAN I WIRE IT UP WITHOUT A RESISTER?, USEING THE 8 VOLT BATTERY? DON'T WANT TO BLOW THE POINTS OR CONDENSER. MY COILS ARE ALL SET TO GO. I HAVE BOTH SET UP'S A BOSCH 600, AND THE COIL PACK. JUST WANT TO KNOW WITCH RUNS BETTER ON MY 21 FORD.THANK YOU.GREG.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:29 am:

If your magneto is healthy and the coils, coil box, wiring and timer are in good shape there will be no real difference between the two.

If any of the above are less than 100%, it will affect the way the car runs and often that is when folks install a distributor.

You stated you built a coil tester. If its the buzz box type, the coils will not perform 100%.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:44 am:

You'll se no difference between a distributor and a properly set up coil system. Either in performance or power. You say you built a coil tester. Not sure if you're talknig about what's commonly called a buzz box. If that's what it is your coils aren't set up properly at all. Did you change the change the capacitors? Do you have an HCCT or Strobo Spark unit available? That's the only way to do it. If this hasn't been done do it before any change over to a dist system. You'll be quite surprised in the results and just might change your mind about spending any more money or doing unnecessary work because it won't get any better that that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:46 am:

Most distributors are made to run on 6 or 12 volts. Basicly the difference is in the ignition coil used with the distributor. The dropping resistor on a 12 volt distributor is there to give you the full 12 volts for starting and then drop the voltage for running. I think the reason is to offset the draw on the battery by the starter. Anyway, I don't think you need the resistor if you are running on 8 volts.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Housego (United Kingdom) on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:56 am:

Hi Richard, I believe the resistor you are talking about is relating to the coil used with a distributor set up. If so it depends on the coil they tend to be rated 6 or 12 volts. If you use a 6 volt rated coil on a 12 volt system a resistor is needed. It seems you have an 8 volt battery fitted so ideally a resistor should also be included "IF" you have a 6 volt coil, without it you run a risk of damaging the coil.

Regarding trembler coils verses distributor it really is your choice, both work. My preference would be trembler coils. Provided they are set up correctly with good capacitors they are absolutely fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:56 am:

Depends on what coil you are using. I would guess you are using a 12 volt coil if running 8 volts(?). Some coils have a built in resistor some don't. If yours does not have built in, then yes you will need and external resistor but the type and size needed to drop the voltage from 8 line volts to safe working range after startup, I don't know.
disclaimer; I am NOT an electrical person, I can not tell you how a 6 or 12 volt coil will work on 8 volts. 8 volt batteries are a mask to cover problems that may or may not exist. If your car has a generator, do you have the correct 8 volt cutout?

By the way, typing in all caps is like yelling, your question is confusing and we are trying to help. You asked for our opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:59 am:

Richard, if your coil tester does not measure the capacitor size and leakage, you are already in trouble and you cannot do a valid test.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 03:52 pm:

Charlie's question to you is important. We're doubting your ability to make a coil tester that could be used to accurately set the coils for your T. There are only three now available the newest the ECCT, the original HCCT, and also the Strobo Spark.

A disy while not original to the T can be made to perform equal to a car with original coils, mag and timer. This assumes the coils have been proper adjusted.

While you are looking at after market options check out the ETimer which looks like original but operates with no wearable parts and performs second to None.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeffrey Bowen on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 04:27 pm:

Here is a pretty good write up on the E-Timer

http://members.iinet.net.au/~cool386/etimer/etimer.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 04:38 pm:

Oh, OK, it's an ignition resistor you're talking about. Like some have said here it depends on the coil you use. Their still easily available at any parts store. The Chrysler type is the most common. When starting cold the resistance is close to nil and allows full voltage to the points for starting. As it heats resistance increases cutting the voltage down and greatly reducing arcing at the points increasing their life. Please reply as to your coil tester as a buzz box only shows that they work but their not set up for use. Do you have a distributor set up on hand or are you going to buy one?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 05:01 pm:

Richard
My understanding is that if you are using a "12 volt " coil for a '50's-'70's North American car it will work great on the 8 volt battery WITHOUT a resistor
Best of luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - 11:15 pm:

thank you all, i was able to pull the knowledge needed from all your response's to go on with my project, no my coil tester is not a buzz box. one of my trip's to Lang's I took the coil's that i adjusted to Steve at Lang's, he checked them on the ford tester and one needed minor tweaking.the coil i plan on useing on the Bosch system is from a 1929 Stutz that has a 6 volt system with the type M duel ignition 8 cyl engine, 16 spark plugs and 62 feet 0f plug wire..that car runs fine with a 8 volt battery.the reason for the 8 volt is so i can drive at night.useing the 8 volt Mazda bulbs.yes i tweaked the cut out to keep my battery happy.thank you all again,I will report my findings, when haying season is over,the rain is not helping. GREG.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 - 06:30 am:

Richard

If your light bulbs don't seem to last very long - send me a PM and I might be able to explain what is happening.


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