Baking soda trick

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Baking soda trick
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred L. Olenberger on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 07:23 pm:

Did I read here years ago that someone suggested a handful of baking soda be put in the radiator to clean it out? How would work? Put it in, run the engine, drain then flush with water?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 07:25 pm:

That might have been to neutralize some sort of acid solution used for dissolving lime or rust, but don't believe it will be beneficial in and of itself...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Jensen on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 09:07 pm:

Years ago it was recommended to use washing soda to clean out radiators. Different stuff than baking soda. I'm not sure how effective it is at cleaning radiators.

http://www.farmallcub.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=7908


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip thompson on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 09:10 pm:

I have used dishwasher detergent with good results


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 09:53 pm:

Radiators experience two different problems as they age.

One, the physical connection between the tubes (whatever their shape) and the fins, gets loose. When that connection is loose, the transfer of heat is interrupted, and the radiator doesn't cool the water properly. This is not easily repaired, and usually means re-core or replace.

Two, the insides of the tubes get coated with stuff that insulates the water from the tube and the fins.

This "stuff" is generally precipitate from the water used in the radiator. We all know we are supposed to use distilled water, but we rarely do.

When the water we use comes from a well, it generally contains small amounts of calcium and/or lime, and sometimes iron and other dissolved chemicals.

As the water gets hot, it tends to release the dissolved materials, which either fall to the bottom of the tank, or adhere to the sides of the tubes. And if it gets hot enough to boil, the water goes away as steam, leaving the solids behind.

Over the years, these solids build up and impede the flow of heat from the water to the tubes to the fins to the air.

Added to that, the insides of the engine block and head were cast using sand molds, and some sand remains embedded in the rough iron water passages, and either dissolve over time or actually fall out, and the insides of the block also rust. All those impurities end up impeding the flow of heat, lessening the effectiveness of the cooling system.

What to do about it?

Well, a lot depends on the nature of the gunk in the radiator. Most of it, however, is typically made up of calcium and lime from the water, and rust from the engine. What you want to do, is dissolve it from the insides of the radiator's tubes.

I guess you can tell I'm leading you toward CLR, an easily available and inexpensive product designed to do just that job.

CLR won't cure all radiator problems, but if your system is coated with what most of them are, it will go a long way.

First, you need to remove the non-dissolved gunk. This consists of mostly flakes of rust and other metals, inside the block and in the bottom of the radiator.

The best way to do this is the remove the radiator from the car. Use your hose to liberally flush out everything you can flush out, with the water going in at the top and exiting at the bottom. Sometimes it helps to stand the radiator up, block the bottom outlet with your hand, and fill it up all the way. Then let the water rush out, bringing with it whatever loose stuff it can carry.

Keep doing this until the insides are as clean as they can get. Then lay the radiator down, with the cap on, and fill it with CLR prepared as per the directions. Let it sit for some hours, then flush it out completely. You might decide to do this twice.

Meanwhile, you can take this opportunity to clean out the water passages in the engine. You'll do this the same way, essentially.

With everything back together, fill it with distilled water and whatever antifreeze you prefer, mixed 50/50. And keep some of this mixture on hand for refills, so you're never tempted to use plain water with all its impurities.

That's the best you can do. It'll only cost you a couple of bottles of CLR and a lot of water, and make a heck of a mess on your driveway, but you should see a remarkable improvement in the cooling of your engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 10:12 pm:

I use CRl (calcium, rust, lime) mixed with hot water.
Use a qt. of CRL to two gallons of hot water.
Run the engine, if you can, keep the radiator full, drain and flush after 20 minutes.
Get it at hardware and building supply stores.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 10:22 pm:

When Peter was posting the post above mine I was typing.
I agree with what he has posted, but I would be afraid to leave the mixture in that long.
A few years ago when I first heard of CRL they warned about leaving it in too long.
Also, if you remove the radiator you can turn it up side down to flush by putting water in the bottom outlet, which will now be at the top


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 10:25 pm:

When Peter was posting the post above mine I was typing.
I agree with what he has posted, but I would be afraid to leave the mixture in that long.
A few years ago when I first heard of CRL they warned about leaving it in too long.
Also, if you remove the radiator you can turn it up side down to flush by putting water in the bottom outlet, which will now be at the top


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wilson, Saint John NB, Canada on Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 11:01 pm:

TSP (Tri-Sodium Phosphate) has been the go-to cleaner for rads for years. It is frequently used for cleaning walls etc. before painting and is also known as washing soda. Mix some in a rad full of water, run for a while and then flush well. reverse flushing is best.May take a couple of applications but usually does a good job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 12:41 am:

Washing soda (sodium carbonate) and trisodium phosphate are not one and the same:

Na2CO3 vs Na3PO4


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 02:26 am:

Distilled water is better? I will use it if so.

If you have the time and inclination you can get two feet of thin cable from the hardware store and use it to clear out engine rust scale. Chuck the cable into a drill. Drain and take off your radiator and both water inlet and outlets. Stick the cable into the engine head and passages and turn on the drill. The cable will naturally fray which is what you want to brush the inside of the passages. It then knocks loose rust scale which you can then flush out with a hose. You probably can clean the front engine passages well but not the rear one as well as it is a far reach with the cable.

My engine was loaded with rust scale. Many of the passages were totally blocked with scale so water was not going through very well if at all. At least a hand full came out. Cleaning is more thoroughly done if the head is taken off but you can get most of it out without taking the head off. Other ways are take the head off and thump it onto a piece of plywood so it does not get damaged. Use a magnet pick up on the engine block passages to take rust scale out.

I have no over heating problems so far. I recently drained and flushed the system after running it 3 days a week for 2 months. Two small chunks of scale and some sediment came out but that was it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 02:26 pm:

Deionized, purified, filtered or drinking water will work fine if you are mixing with a good Conventional (green) antifreeze. If you have very hard well type water you might not want to use that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Monday, June 26, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

I grew up in New Orleans. Our drinking water is drawn from the Mississippi River, and purified. We always considered it very good and pure - it certainly looked and tasted good.

When I had been drinking this water for about 20 years I got a job in a company that used distilled water in a film processing procedure. As the junior guy, I was assigned the job of operating the continuous still. It was mind-numbing and boring, and I did it for ten days, producing about ten thousand gallons of pure water.

Then I was instructed to clean out the still. When I opened the bottom chamber of the still, the amount of MUD there was horrifying! I was assured the still had been cleaned before I started, and all that bucket of mud came from the ten thousand gallons I had distilled.

My point in this, is that the drinking water you get from your tap may look clean, taste clean, and have no un-healthy chemicals in it, but it most assuredly has dissolved solids in it! What they are, depends on where you live.

That's why I recommend distilled water in the radiator. And why I drink bottled water when I'm in New Orleans.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 08:13 pm:

Try Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda. This was known in the old days as "sal soda" (soda ash). It's a tried/true radiator clean out product.

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, June 29, 2017 - 08:57 pm:

Distilled water in and by itself is NOT better. I've read different things on different occasions, here's one very recently that explains it very simply.---distilled water is not a good idea . . . seems that water without any dissolved mineral elements is "looking" for something to dissolve - turns out distilled water is more corrosive than tap water.

That said, distilled water is okay however with 50/50 antifreeze, as the antifreeze has a built in corrosion inhibiter.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration