Older pistons in a newer engine?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Older pistons in a newer engine?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Lytle on Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 05:33 pm:

Howdy all, I'm restoring a 1923 Centerdoor. There was no chassis but a friend generously gave me a '23 engine for it. The #4 piston was badly scored and possibly cracked (the cylinder was smooth..oddly-enough..maybe it had been honed and they re-used the piston?). I found an old matching set of 'fat lip' pistons (with the 1/4" lip on the inside skirt bottom). I was wondering if these will be ok to use -even though the engine has the lighter weight rods, etc..?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 06:17 pm:

The piston must be the same type and weight as the other 3 otherwise the engine will be unbalanced and vibrate.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 06:47 pm:

Don't mix and match pistons of different weights and materials. Check the size of bore and redo as needed. If you are going to this much work do it right get a new set of aluminum pistons and do the valve if they are the old style two piece.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Lytle on Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 08:07 pm:

Thanks guys. I was intending to use the whole matching set of the four 'fat lip' pistons..and was wondering if it's okay to use them at all. (Although yes I had also considered getting a new aluminum set). Thanks -Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Monday, June 26, 2017 - 01:38 am:

There's nothing wrong with using a matched set of cast iron pistons, but if they didn't come out of the same box, get a scale that weighs in grams and weigh all pistons. Use a file on the inside to remove enough metal to make the 3 heaviest ones match the lightest piston. Bear in mind that cast iron adds more reciprocating weight to the end of the rods, thus robbing you of a little power. That's one reason most restorers switch to aluminum pistons. As others have said above, be sure and check your cylinder bores. The last T that I bought was supposed to have a rebuilt engine, but it didn't run just right. Measuring the cylinders, I found that two were one size and the other two were a different size.; three sizes ranging from .010 to .030 in the same block !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Lytle on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 02:46 am:

Thanks Terry, Much appreciated !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 07:26 am:

I always reuse old, original (but good) Ford parts before I EVER put anything reproduction in. If they are a matched set, put them in and use them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 10:31 am:

James, I just rebuilt a motor this winter and reused the Ford iron pistons in a standard bore. I found a mix of one old style heavy piston in with three later light pistons. That was something like 170 gram difference. Also I chipped 30 to 40 grams of carbon out of the inside top of the pistons. I got them balanced to within 18 grams. runs nice and smooth now.


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