Where do they go

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Where do they go
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 10:27 am:

Came across a bit of history and the survival rate of the Model T and its variants...

A local Chamber of Commerce news letter was highlighting a local plumbing business..the business started in 1914, the company used a converted 1906 Maxwell touring car that was converted by a local garage into a service truck for plumbing.

By 1915 business was doing well that it was decided to buy a one ton TT from the local Ford Dealer. The truck was in service for two weeks when crossing at a rail road crossing a lose PRR freight car hit the truck and was a total loss...

So if it was a 1 ton TT it must have been early in production? Or a local tale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 10:30 am:

If it was actually 1915 it couldn't have been a TT. TT production began in 1917.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 10:43 am:

TTs were not made available for sale until 1918.

As far as the accident is concerned, if you research the local newspaper, it may be possible to determine the actual date of occurrence.

If the vehicle was a TT, then it would have happened 1918 or later. If it was a Smith Form-a-Truck or similar aftermarket set up for a Model T, then it could have occurred earlier than 1918.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 11:03 am:

Ever play telephone? The first person is given a written phrase and whispers it to the person next to him, who whispers it to the next person, and so on around the room. When the last person writes down what he heard, it rarely matches the original phrase, and is usually ridiculously garbled. Local histories and family histories often fit this pattern. My aunt told me the first car here on the farm was a 1919 Chevrolet. But a picture of it shows a 1916. I figure that it was bought used in 1919. That's a mild example of history getting scrambled. Some stories get wildly twisted. That's one reason so many Model T's get misidentified.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 11:14 am:

Josef Stalin was a high school gym teacher in Indiana. Or so I was told.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 11:51 am:

We were talking to my wife's cousin about there dad and when he farmed. I told them I bought his hog loading shoot on his farm auction that he built using tall steel wheels from his old dump rake. I told her that we still had the old steel wheels from it and she could have them for free if she wanted them. She was so exited about them and showed her dad them and he went on and on about the old days using the dump rake and the loading shoot which really made his day. I told that story to my son Carl and he said "dad you sold that loading shoot on your farm auction". So I checked the photos from my auction and there it was in the line up. I don't know where I got those wheels. I am going to keep that secret from my wife and her relatives.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 12:11 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 12:15 pm:

I think Constantine nailed it. Maybe Dearborn and maybe some other brand, but it certainly makes sense of the story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 12:18 pm:

OK the TT appeared 1917-1918. What truck is Bruce discussing for 1914 - the Bible page 462?

It is difficult to know if the 1915 one ton truck was a 1914 sold in 1915 or a conversion to some variation of a one ton? As for newspaper research - two possibilities a sensational local news story with details, or just a note that there was a vehicle-rail accident at a crossing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 02:34 pm:

Considering all the local paper notes Rob has posted about who's who in what town had bought a new Ford six, and where they were travelling - maybe even the sale of the truck was mentioned in the paper if the town was small enough?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 08:32 pm:

Even dating trucks converted from car chassis is fraught. I cannot seen any date on Constantine's posted advertisement. Sure, the conversions could and were fitted to early cars, but they could not be fitted until they were manufactured. Is there information on when Smith's Form-a-truck kits and the like were developed?

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 10:02 pm:

Most of the conversions for ton size were in 1915-16 to start, but earlier could have been done by other concerns too.




Probably a lot of bare T chassis became extended ton trucks with chain drives.




Likely the Ford dealers pushed Henry to the TT, as the T was going strong in the low cost area, and selling a low cost ton truck to industry just made for good profits too.

So Henry came out with the TT in July 1917 as an '1918' model of course. TT's were built in 1917 year, but sold as 1918 models.





1917


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 11:38 pm:

According to Bruce McCalley, only 3 TTs were produced in calendar 1917 as a "pilot run."

With the above in mind, I presume that TTs were not made for sale available to the general public until calendar 1918.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Saturday, July 01, 2017 - 11:11 am:

Smith Form-a-truck kits come out in 1913 I believe. Possibly the world's first "semi-trailer" in 1914 used a Smith; see:

https://www.thehenryford.org/collections-and-research/digital-collections/artifa ct/171656/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, July 01, 2017 - 11:58 am:

Erik

Maybe Bruce stated '3' from records he saw in research. (ref. p. 231 Big Book)

The 1918 Ford year: Aug. 1, 1917 to July 30, 1918.

So maybe more than 3 TT's were built in the calendar year 1917?

(ref. p. 462 Big Book),
Other Records at Archives Acc. 231:
"1917 41,725 Trucks"
"1918 62,444 Trucks"

Getting the whole truth on Ford production is likely difficult, even Bruce stated "Those figures listed for the period 1903-1921, therefore, could be suspect."

(Message edited by Dan_Treace on July 01, 2017)


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