Information requested on tire. U.S. Tire

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Information requested on tire. U.S. Tire
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 05:39 pm:

Got two front tires on the family 1920 T. They are the smooth tread design and are 30 x 3. We took them up to the tire shop to air up and he mentioned that they were made during the war. We presume WWII. And, maybe even synthetic rubber.

Markings on the tire:
U.S. Tire
U.S. Rubber
War Tire FF
on the backside of the tires as mounted: .military.

Any thoughts as to when these tires were produced?

I'll hang up and listen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 05:53 pm:

Can't tell you any thing about the tire but that wheel is earlier than 1920, round felloe was up to 1916.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 06:00 pm:

The wheels had Greyhound tags on them, so we think they were purchased for the restoration and may not be original to the car. The family thinks it is a 1917, but photos on the forum indicate it is a 20 motor and a 20 frame.

Would be pretty neat to find out these are WWI tires on the wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 06:31 pm:

Amazing if a tire could hold up so well for 100 years? Must have been perfect conditions in a dark and cool basement, then.
Round felloes were replaced with square some time in 1918, I think.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 08:08 pm:

Well, I should know what a fellow is, but I'm still learning. The "spokes" are round at the rim end and round through their body and then go to a four sided "pegP type shape where they bolt into the hub or drum.
The exact same same on my 21" split rim wheels.

US Rubber was one of the first 12 companies on the stock exchange and was formed prior to 1900. But the "war time" reference and the military stamp on the tire, are steering me towards WWII, not WWI. I did not think that any raw material, let alone rubber was much of a shortage in WWI as we were only in the war a few months.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 08:30 pm:

I had synthetic rubber tires on my 1930 Plymouth when I bought it from the original owner in 1962. He said he bought them during the war and that they never showed any signs of wear. He was quite old so I doubt he did much driving but the tires did look almost brand new. Unfortunately, they were so hard that they didn't stop well at all and seemed to skim over the road rather than gripping it. I quickly replaced them with Allstate Safety Tread tires and am still running them more than 50 years later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 08:35 pm:

Yep WWII. The "felloe" is the part next to the rim, on your 21" it is metal. Notice how nicely shaped the part is next to the spokes. The later rims were not rounded, just square; spokes were always rounded.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 09:18 pm:

But were there any smooth threadless tires made between say, 1920 and when the antique car movement created a demand in the 50's?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 10:52 pm:

Just a thought. We did some work on a major military base about thirty years ago. The base had been founded (in Califunny) during the (so called) Civil War, and updated with each successive war thereafter. I wished so much that I could have taken a camera onto that base. Many of the buildings dated back to the 1890s, and they were still using equipment from that era. It was like stepping back in time to see the old brick buildings with carts, wheelbarrows, hand trucks, and tools just like every day work would have looked so many years before. There were more than a couple things in that place that used model T wheels. And that was in the '80s.
I can see them still using enough things using model T size wheels during WWII to need tires supplied. Byt the way, many of them had treadless tires.

Maybe one of our militaria collectors can decipher the codes to tell for certain during which war they were made.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Friday, June 30, 2017 - 11:02 pm:

What about the tires with the S-3 designation? I was always told they were synthetic tires during the war.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 - 04:16 pm:

Interesting that in all these years and all these owners and all these tires, no one else has ever seem a tire with "military" stamped on it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 - 04:55 pm:

And my research on WWII rationing indicates that new tires were only issued to limited public transportation and vital industries and that some civilians were allowed recaps.
No indication that this 30x3 I/S/ Rubber tire was either.

Verrrrry interesting . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 - 05:51 pm:

Robert, this is a puzzler that deserves to be solved. What about aircraft tires ?? How long did the Army Air Corps hang onto their Curtiss-Wright Jennies as trainers ? What kind / size tires did they take ? Maybe there was a biplane trainer that used "Model T" tires well into the WWII era ? Aircraft experts, help ??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 - 09:15 pm:

It does say 4 ply. I would think aircraft tires or heavy industrial equiptment would have a higher ply rating.

Curiouser and curiouser...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Matthiesen on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 - 03:25 am:

In the early years of WW-2 the US was still using a lot of old equipment. I could see there being a lot of older Army caissons, (trailers), that used 30 X 3 clincher tires, that now needed new tires, because they were now being put back in to use. Tread wouldn't be needed on these tires for that use. Hopefully a WW-2 equipment collector or historian will post the answer to what these tires were used on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 - 09:43 am:

I'm active on the military vehicle site as my 42 GPW required a lot of forum help. I'll reach out to them with this and see where it leads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 - 03:13 pm:

Take a look at a site called "triplane builder.com". There's article on aircraft tires that indicates existing tires for bicycles, automobiles and motorcycles were used on early aircraft, including clincher type tires.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 - 09:36 pm:

The more I look into this, the more I run the risk of my wife finding out her Grandfather was running black market tires on his Model T.

I'm treading litely. I will assure her they were military surplus.

Boy, if I was running clinchers on the War Wagon, these would be pretty neat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 12:02 am:

That's funny Robert! :-)


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