How many rotate their tires every year?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: How many rotate their tires every year?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 02:57 pm:

I might start since i sea wear on the front and they should wear better if i rotate them like i do on modern iron


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 03:20 pm:

My tires rotate every time I drive the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 03:20 pm:

That's a no for the Old and a no for the modern iron.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 03:26 pm:

For those of us in the two size club i think not.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 03:34 pm:

I should but I don't.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 03:35 pm:

Generally speaking, rotating tires just makes them all wear out at the same time, so you can replace them all as a set.

On modern cars, with 4 wheel independent suspension, certain wear patterns will develop and can get noisy, often sounding like a failed wheel bearing. Rotation will tend to minimize that. Also on modern cars, replacing tires as a set can be critical, as mismatched tires can confuse anti-lock and stability control systems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 03:36 pm:

What Bud said for us TT guys.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 04:23 pm:

Henry,Now thats funny!!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 04:36 pm:

Two sizes on mine, rear tires are wearing evenly . . . no demountables, and speedometer drive on the right front wheel, so even though there's a visible difference in wear on the front, I'm not going to switch them - I'm too lazy !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 05:31 pm:

Just curious... what models have the same size tires front and rear?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Nebelsky on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 05:42 pm:

Canadian built T's do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 05:53 pm:

Tommy: All Canadian produced cars had 30x3-1/2" from start. US cars on the other hand were built with 30x3-1/2" demountables all around from 1919 (standard on closed cars, optional but very common on open cars.)
From 1925 21x4.50" demountables all around were also available as options and from 1926 21" wire wheels. Undemountable 30" wheels were still available on open cars in 1926, but I think the front wheels were altered to 30x3-1/2" like the rears by then, so in 1926/27 all cars had the same tire dimension all around - but never the TT trucks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 06:00 pm:

Tommy

I am not going to be in any contests, so I have the same size tires on my Speedster and my Touring, so I can rotate them just like a modern car. I see no point in having 2 different size tires. Then I can carry just one spare and I know it will fit on whatever wheel goes flat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 06:08 pm:

Now the question would be, how many are rotating by the book?
conventional tire, crossed from front to back.
Modern, radials just front to back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 07:47 pm:

Not with 2 of brand x on the rear and 2 of brand y on the front and brand z for a spare. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 10:20 pm:

Tire rotation. A waste of time.
Can also create a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Thursday, July 06, 2017 - 10:38 pm:

Aaron, don't waste the opportunity to inform. What kind of problem ? Do tell, please.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Friday, July 07, 2017 - 01:20 am:

I installed wire wheels with the same size tires...makes rotating tires easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Friday, July 07, 2017 - 01:31 am:

I rotated the wheels and tires on a speedster and from then on it would shimmery below 35 mph.
After rebushing the king pins, new everything in the steering it still did the same thing.
It turned out to be a very slightly out of round tire on the left front.
I rotated them back again d the problem was gone.
Part of my job at work is rotating and balancing tires.
We never rotate unless we rebalance the two that are going on the front. We seldom have any problems after rotating a customer's tires but for all the time and expense to the customer I have never been able to be convinced it was worth it.
But then I only have been doing it since 1956 so what do I know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Friday, July 07, 2017 - 01:44 am:

This is a little off topic but about 10 years ago I did a brake job on a late model Corvette for a used car dealer.
He asked me to rotate the tires front to rear while I had them off.
He later told me had spent time and money getting a check engine light off.
It turned out to be there was a size difference in front and rear tires. Putting the big ones in front and smaller ones in back messed up the computer.
Just thought that story could save one of you some grief.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Friday, July 07, 2017 - 02:01 am:

Like some of the high performance sports cars with different sizes I'm in the two size club.

Running with dyna beads keeps them always balanced perfectly though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, July 07, 2017 - 03:08 am:

Because we drive our Model T's mostly on local roads which are crowned for drainage (more so than highways), our cars naturally want to run downhill, like water. -And that means, they tend to pull to the right a bit, so we counteract that with left pressure on the wheel which scrubs the tread on the right side of the right-front tire (The left-front tire, being much closer to the top of the crown of the street, wears much more evenly across the tread). -There are a few ways of addressing this problem:

1.) After you accumulate sufficient wear on the right side of the right-front tire, dismount that right-front tire from the rim and remount it with the worn tread toward the inside. -Now you can wear out the other side of the tire.

2.) To counteract the right-turning tendency without correcting so much with the steering wheel, put an extra five or ten pounds of air in your right-front tire and (heresy!) run no more than 50 pounds in your left-front tire. -Yes, I know you've heard that under-inflation can cause you to shear a valve-stem. -That's very true of the rear tires because some serious fore-and-aft acceleration and braking forces are inflicted upon them. -The front tires? -Eh, not so much.

3.) Rotate you front tires. -This tactic will eventually cause you to need to go with option #1, but at least this will double the time you can procrastinate that chore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Matthiesen on Friday, July 07, 2017 - 03:11 am:

All stock Corvettes from C4 on up, (1984), have a front to rear tire stagger, ( different front and rear tire diameters).
So stock US 1918 and earlier Model T's are in the same camp as Corvettes, or sort of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Friday, July 07, 2017 - 10:35 am:

On modern cars there is a problem with tire rotation; the tires are now required by a (stupid) law to have pressure sensors. Each sensor has a number so that the dealer's scan tool can determine where the problem is. If you rotate the tires, sensor number 1, which may have been the right front, is now on the rear. If a sensor goes bad, the dealer will pull the right front apart, replace the sensor, and the problem is still there! The sensors need to be reprogrammed at each rotation. You now need a computer to rotate the tires! Ain't gonna happen with our most modern car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Friday, July 07, 2017 - 10:39 am:

Are you kidding me? It's bad enough mounting them in the first place! Of course with demountable rims the job becomes easier, but I'm not going to do them either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 01:10 am:

I do agree with rotating wheels (all 5 in the old days) and this practice plus the correct inflation pressure does extend tyre life. Now days with unidirectional tyres and space saver spare wheels I move my wheels on my Falcon front to back twice a year. My Model T's do not enjoy this luxury but I do keep the pressures high. What are you going to achieve by doing it on a Model T that doesn't travel that far every year?? My tyres will most likely rot out before wearing out.
Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 01:32 am:

In my opinion, the best thing to do is spend a little time to properly set the gather on your front end. Mine was out by more than 1/2" and wore the tires out in a very short time. Now, after the proper adjustment they seem to be wearing all about the same, but i do swap front to rear at the end of the season.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 09:23 am:

I do it annually (with balancing) on my truck. For the Model T I have not bothered yet, but probably should do it this fall when I get it back up on jack stands for the winter. With wire wheels it shouldn't be much hassle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Sunday, July 09, 2017 - 10:38 pm:

I rotate mine about once a year and just did them again yesterday. I always move the best rear tire to the highest wearing position on the front. I want to wear them all out at once so I can ditch the Wards Riversides for a more correct set of Firestones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 12:35 am:

I have cars that don't move for 2 years at a time but I always rotate the tires, lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker, Oklahoma City on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 08:02 am:

With 30x3" in front and 30x3.5" in the rear, tire rotation would be a fun endeavor for me :-)

The front passenger tire gets the most wear, so the best thing to do is swap the fronts to keep the wear even.

Other than that, good luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 09:02 am:

with 5.25's on the rear and 4.50's on the front...nope!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 09:14 am:

I rotate Betsy's tires as needed to even out the wear. I have a total of six mounted Universal T-driver tires - four on the car, one I carry on the running board as a spare, and one more in the basement. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 09:36 am:

If there is anything that can be said of this thread i think it's all model T's are not the same? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 05:23 pm:

Not rotating them on my T, don't want to mess up the computer !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 11:34 pm:

Oops, I miscounted, there are two mounted spare tires in the basement, for a total of seven. :-)


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration