Anyone using these brake shoes?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Anyone using these brake shoes?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 10:39 am:

Have a set of these and am thinking of using them. Anyone out these using them ... and what linings are you using?

Brake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 11:23 am:

Yep, I have used them on three cars, got linings from car mc master, don't remember the specs but they have several to choose from. Give you a much better parking brake and would stop the car though not fast. Hold in reverse. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 11:44 am:

McMaster should have the lining. You should need the 3/16 at what ever width. Get the stuff with the brass wire in it. You can buy by the foot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 01:39 pm:

I have one like that and one that has solid ends where it contacts the cam. I relined both with the woven lining, with brass wire in it, from McMaster-Carr. The solid one fits great but the one like above has given me a lot of grief trying to get it to fit. The one you have is obviously new and mine are used. Maybe it will work better for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 04:42 pm:

I hate to be rude, but I don't like those. Cast iron shoes for the small drum can be properly set up and adjusted and work great on a model T. Some of the curved channel steel shoes may also be okay. But those are way too flimsy. The ends give and bend (sometimes collapse permanently). No amount of proper adjustment will give a reliable hold in an emergency.
A few years ago, I was toying with the idea of brazing steel rods inside a set of these to make them strong enough, but I didn't have any of them, and wasn't willing to pay hardly anything for such junk. I found a set at a local swap meet for two dollars. Was about to buy them, and no less than Milt Webb walked up (he knew the seller, but not me personally), told the seller to not sell those things to ANYBODY! Throw them out. Under the circumstances, I did not argue my intentions. Never got a set. Never tried fixing their weakness. I had thought about going back a bit later, but Milt hung around and chatted with the seller for at least an hour.

The best, cheapest, thing to do, is buy a good set of cast iron lined shoes for the small drum T. Fix the cams, fit everything properly, well centered to the drum on the axle. Then adjust so that locking the wheel occurs at maximum leverage for the cam arm, and the brake handle only about an inch or two past clutch disengage. I have set up several Ts that way, and could lock both rear wheels anytime I wanted to. Even on the center-door sedan.
With the weight on the center-door sedan, I could control the braking to not lock the wheels and get maximum braking and control in a panic stop. Did so several times in that car. Speedsters are so light in the back that they lock the rear wheels easily, which can cause control issue under some circumstances.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 06:57 pm:

I agree with Wayne. Tried a set of those several years ago and never could get them to work right. They tended to flex in the wrong places. Lined cast iron are the way to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 08:12 pm:

Wayne is correct. The action of the brake cam will drive one end of the shoe outwards toward the drum. That is good. The other end will be driven inwards, and the shoes can bend and the brake becomes inoperable. Big trucks tackled this problem with an S shaped cam.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 08:18 pm:

So why does the 26/27 band type brake shoes work?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, July 08, 2017 - 09:53 pm:

Mark: I think it's because they have flanges on both edges reinforcing the band all around, and the contact areas to the brake cam isn't made out of the shoe material - it's solid steel riveted in place.

ytr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, July 09, 2017 - 12:43 am:

DUH on me! I knew that but spaced out and forgot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, July 09, 2017 - 09:21 am:

I've used those kind before. The comments above are true, but if they are not all tweaked, they will work. Just don't tighten the back bolt real tight and you should be ok.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, July 09, 2017 - 08:41 pm:

Larry, those are not original Ford shoes! Do you mean "I've seen those those kind used before"?

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, July 10, 2017 - 10:24 am:

In my Humble opinion these are THE BEST after market rear brake shoes ever made for the Model T.

I have been running these NOS shoes for several years on our 1915 roadster and they work great. They give even pressure over the full surface of the brake drums.
These would be a great item to repop. I have a second set NOS that I have been holding that could be used for that purpose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, July 10, 2017 - 06:34 pm:

Those posted by Jay are the best I have ever seen also. The added adjustment helps get them set to stop the car with maximum efficiency, given the size restraints.
I have never used the more recent "better" ones offered today by the parts suppliers. I hear that they are much easier to set up and fit into place. (Compared with the cheaper ones that have been available for many years.) Most people say that they are worth the extra cost. However, I have never had any trouble setting up the cheaper ones that have been available for years.
Thank you Jay, for posting the pictures of those (and the box!).

All this said. For best braking, and service. Good outside brakes are better yet. Me, personally, for brass era cars I prefer the look without the outside brakes. So, the few I have had, got lined inside brakes. I also used lined inside brakes on a couple low-buck speedsters. The others got outside brakes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Monday, July 10, 2017 - 09:10 pm:

Better take all mine off and throw them away! KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Monday, July 10, 2017 - 10:13 pm:

Yes i have model e brake lining works great


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 12:01 am:

Keith, don't do that.They work well while they work. The problem comes when the linings and the drum are worn. Then the cam is at a greater angle when it contacts the shoe. The greater the angle, the more chance there is that one end of the shoe will bend in. I have had this happen and the shoes will bind on the drum and drag.

The better ones have a casting riveted to the end of the steel shoe and these are more rigid.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Sherman Tacoma WA on Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 01:46 am:

Jay, what and where should I look for all of the parts and pieces that you show in your photos? I have nothing with regards to brake shoes and a the required components. I do have good drums.
Thank you, Paul in Tacoma


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, July 13, 2017 - 03:48 am:

I have to agree with Wayne. My buddy had those on his car. The ends grab on the cam and bend inward. I believe he has since replaced them.


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