Rear end grease cleaning solutions

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Rear end grease cleaning solutions
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 09:33 am:

I'm sure this is an age old dilemma ... and actually moot, at this point, as I'm pretty much done with my cleaning, but what do most folks use to clean this sticky goo-grease-oil in the rear end?

In the old days, when I was in high school, cleaning parts at the garage, I'd use gasoline, as that's what the mechanics used, as well. Then, when I was 'of age', I used to use a parts bin with pump, that used diesel fuel/kerosene with Gunk, I think it was ... additive. And that worked great. I was bummed I couldn't get my hands on another one (other pump died, and I pitched it all during a move), and wondered about how to get rid of gunky fuel, so went with 'Purple' bio-degradable de-greaser. That didn't work nearly as well as the old school stuff ....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 09:42 am:

I still use gas at times, which in my opinion is no more dangerous than lacquer thinner, acetone or other such products. You just have to use common sense and practice safety. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 09:43 am:

I use kerosene in a Harbor Freight parts washer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 09:44 am:

Oil Eater.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 09:47 am:

yeah .. gasoline seems to work the best for me, too. In the old days we would take it out back and dump it. Can't burn it off any more either. I know the local recycling shop will take kerosene as hazardous waste.

Yeah .. the 6 gallon HF parts washer is what I was looking for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 10:25 am:

I used a can of WD40, worked great! Actually it's about the only thing wd40 is good for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 10:27 am:

I'm with John S. Oil Eater. It's just some sort of soap, but boy does it work. Non flammable, safe on hands, even approved for use on food processing equipment. Available in gallon containers at the auto parts store. Costs around $12 a gallon, but can be diluted quite a bit for routine cleaning. I use it full strength on really greasy parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 10:36 am:

Gasoline here, if I need to paint it I finish with oil eater, unfortunatly nobody here sells oil eater.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 10:38 am:

When I was gathering parts to put together a Ruckstell, I sent out my axle housings to get "Professionally" cleaned and powder coated.
Months later, I decided to take a look down the axle tubes. I couldn't believe how much debris was still in the tubes. What I did to fix this was to hit the local big box hardware store and buy a plumber's expanding pipe plug approximately the same size as the inside diameter of the axle tube. These plugs are sometimes called "Dynamite" or "Jim" plugs.
I installed the plug in the inside end of the axle housing as tight as I could tighten it. I stood the housing up, plug end down in a drip pan, in case there was a leak. I then filled the tube as high as I could with Zep Orange Cleaner from Home Depot.
I let it soak for a week. The crud that came out of that tube was unbelievable! When I looked down the axle tube I saw a clean, shiny tube with absolutely no oil or debris. I should note that I used the orange cleaner at 100% strength.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 10:59 am:

I take to a good shop and have them hot tanked. Takes the paint off but the shop we use, when we pick them up them are clean.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 11:06 am:

Getting hard to locate a "real hot tank" up here in Western Washington - EPA restrictions & all !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 11:19 am:

I take a wire wheel just a bit larger than the inside diameter of the tube and have a long steel rod with a bolt welded to it. Cleans to a bright shine in no time. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Ressijac on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 05:27 pm:

After cleaning the parts the best I could, I took them to a local transmission shop and they ran them through their cleaner, twice, for $30. Very clean and ready to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, July 17, 2017 - 06:03 pm:

A mixture of diesel and mineral spirits works well. Gasoline also works as good as anything.


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