Leather belts attached to axles

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Leather belts attached to axles
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George schmidt on Friday, July 21, 2017 - 09:46 pm:

Has anyone placed leather belts on their axles. A friend applied them to his Model T (front and back) and indicated, they helped in obsorbing shocks to the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Friday, July 21, 2017 - 09:55 pm:

FWIW I would be afraid to snap something very expensive and lose my brakes.
Vern


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:00 pm:


Not mine but you get the idea


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:01 pm:

I always have a few belts before I get behind the wheel of my T. And, yes, it does soften the ride.

Oh wait.... you mean the car.

Nevermind.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:25 pm:

George's pics are of my Betsy, a 1924 cut-off touring car. I have run the rebound straps on the front and rear for three years now.

I had to replace the rear straps recently because I went over a speed bump too fast and both straps broke at the buckle. There was no other damage to the car.

They do help reduce the ejection seat effect on bumps. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:34 pm:

Why not let the springs do their job? If anything they would stiffen the ride.

There were some aftermarket shock absorbers that used leather straps but that's the only thing they have in common.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, July 21, 2017 - 10:41 pm:

The springs do their job in compression, the straps just limit the rebound. If you have moved a modern shock absorber by hand, you will find that they are much stiffer in rebound than in compression.

By the way, early Corvettes came with rebound straps from the factory. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 08:28 am:

Oh, and so did MGs. :-)

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw=corvette+rebound+straps&_osacat=0&_from=R4 0&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.Xcorvette+mg+rebound+straps.TRS0&_nkw= corvette+mg+rebound+straps&_sacat=0


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 08:51 am:

Actually, I often get comments from passengers in my "improved" T that it rides far better then they expected. I feel the same way - considering it's very basic suspension system, it does ride well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 08:52 am:

My 1907 Autocar came with them from the factory and they work. I drove without them while they were being replaced and it makes a big difference.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 09:02 am:

a restriction like that on the rear of a coupe can make it dangerous when hard braking. I had AC shocks on my 27 and going down hill or in hard braking the weight shift tended to make the rear end light.


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