OT - Automotive Industry in NY

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT - Automotive Industry in NY
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 09:26 am:

During my many years on the road in New England representing an automotive aftermarket company I have had the privilege of meeting many people and learning of all the businesses involved in supporting automobile production.

NY State has a rich automobile/parts production history though it has certainly has seen better days. One company in particular, New Process Gear, once owned by Willys/Overland, was a standout for me. Their factory in Dewitt NY just outside of Syracuse was massive!

"New Process Rawhide Co. was founded in 1888, so named because it used a new process to harden rawhide for things such as gears. In 1913, the company’s name was changed to New Process Gear and its work focused on making metal automotive gears.

Chrysler bought the company during the Depression.

Beginning in 1989, New Process Gear changed hands several times before it was bought by Magna International Inc. in 2004.

New Process Gear, made adapters, transaxles, compounders, manual transmissions and transfer cases the parts that turn two-wheeled drive vehicles into four-wheel drive."




More to follow..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 10:34 am:

I had the pleasure of taking a tour at New Process as a CAP (Chrysler Apprentice Program) student back around 1996. You are right, the facility is MASSIVE!

I definitely loved at that time, the "preferred" parking for Ford, GM, and Chrysler vehicles and then the "other" lot for all the foreign cars to park in.


You are also right that New York is rich in auto history, and it is a shame to see such prominent facilities dwindle to nothing in comparison to their heyday, and for all the ones that have closed shop. Times are changing and not for the better in most cases IMO.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 10:45 am:

If i remember right there was a New York state car maker called Shawmutt that did quite well in a race!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 11:07 am:

Hi Bud,

If you are thinking of the 1909 transcontinental race with two Model Ts and other cars, That Shawmut was built in Stoneham Massachusetts. Sorry, just trying to prevent fake news, Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 11:28 am:

When one looks far back,there is a lot of what if involved as what if there never was a fire?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 11:28 am:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Motor_vehicle_manufacturers_based_in_New_ York


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 11:35 am:

Of course there was the legendary Franklin Automobile Company in Syracuse..

The First Franklin

"First Model ever produced in 1902 with first Franklin owner, S. G. Averell of New York City - Automotive industries, Volume 26, 1911
The first Franklin took two months to build and was on the market by June 23, 1902. It holds the distinction of being the first four-cylinder automobile produced in the United States.[8] Most cars of the time had a single or two-cylinder motor.[17] As Franklin had hoped, the four-cylinder engine eliminated the bouncing suffered by cars manufactured with more common one-cylinder engines.[18]

The car weighed 900 pounds (410 kg) and traveled up to 12 miles per hour (19 km/h).[13] Its vertical four-cylinder air-cooled engine with overhead valves sat transversely at the front of a wooden chassis. The Franklin concept was copied by both Marion and Premier auto makers of Indianapolis, Indiana.[19]

The car was test driven on a short trip to Cortland, New York, and returned home by way of Skaneateles one afternoon.[3] S. G. Averell, a New York sportsman and relative of New York Governor W. Averell Harriman, bought the car on June 23, 1902. He paid $1,200. "It had a chain drive and the engine was mounted crosswise. The four-cylinder engine weighing 230 pounds (100 kg) was about one-fourth the weight of the car. The car had jump spark ignition, splash lubrication and enclosed planetary transmission. The gear ratio was 12-to-1 for low and 4-to-1 for high and there was reverse gear as well as the two forward. The steering gear was on the right, with wheel control."[9]




As it looks today...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 11:58 am:

Pierce Arrow


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 12:09 pm:

Brewster Automobile


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 12:16 pm:

The Oh-We-Go (Owego NY ~ 1914) is not listed, unless by some other manufacturer name. It is included in this list for USA manufacturers. Thanks to all for this interesting thread on local automobile history, jb

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_defunct_automobile_manufacturers_of_the_Un ited_States


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 12:27 pm:

The Rainer started in New York then moved to Saginaw,Mi at the plant where i started with GM long long ago! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 12:31 pm:

Brewster was a coach builder for Rolls Royce.... after hard times began October 29, 1929, business with Rolls Royce gradually became non-profitable to continue.

Brewster contracted in 1934 with the Ford Motor Company for about 137 V8 chassis to build cars.

Edison's son, Charles- who would become the future governor of New Jersey and Secretary of the Navy under FDR, had a Brewster Town Car, and is presently displayed at the garage at the Edison Glenmont Estate in West Orange, NJ.

Bob J.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 12:41 pm:

Brewster Town Car pictures from internet..... not Charles Edison's personal car.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Brewster+Town+Car&tbm=isch&imgil=AqqiTcSRGEp9PM% 253A%253B4Ff3A9eZapOrXM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.conceptcarz.com%25252Fv ehicle%25252Fz11348%25252FFord-Brewster.aspx&source=iu&pf=m&fir=AqqiTcSRGEp9PM%2 53A%252C4Ff3A9eZapOrXM%252C_&usg=__V7Quko95zqj8rG_li5qZSVPNG_o%3D&biw=1440&bih=7 91&ved=0ahUKEwjS0uD8qZ3VAhVBWD4KHZjeB1UQyjcIPQ&ei=uH9zWdKWC8Gw-QGYvZ-oBQ#imgrc=A qqiTcSRGEp9PM:.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 01:45 pm:

Oh-We-Go:

https://www.hemmings.com/magazine/hcc/2010/03/O-We-Go/2964991.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 03:34 pm:

Brockway trucks were quite popular in their day...


Brockway Motor Company was a builder of custom heavy-duty trucks in Cortland, New York, from 1912 to 1977. It was founded as Brockway Carriage Works in 1875 by William Brockway. His son George Brockway later turned the carriages into a truck manufacturer in 1909.
During World War II Brockway manufactured the B666 heavy truck, including the B666 Daybrook M-II-A bridge erector[1] and C666 Quick Way crane,[2] as well as G547 and G690 6-ton 6×6 bridging trucks, part of a standard design series also built by Corbitt and White. G547 "Treadway" trucks had a large hoist on the rear for self-unloading, while the G690 chassis were fitted with "Quickway" cranes, also used in bridging operations.[3]
The company was purchased by Mack Trucks Inc. in August 1956 and remained a division of Mack until its closing in June 1977. Mack cited "union troubles" for the closure.[4




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 05:43 pm:

Walter built trucks in Voorheesville, NY (did I spell that right?). Walter Snow Fighters had quite a reputation; our town had one when I was growing up and us kids used to go out and watch it buck drifts when some of the coastal blizzards closed school. I found this 1935 16mm film on Youtube of a Walter doing just that in New York state:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OW8iCvnKWXg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Saturday, July 22, 2017 - 08:52 pm:

Chase motor truck in Syracuse, was the connection that led George Brockway to build the Brockway Motor Truck, George was a director of the Chase Motor Truck Co. Chase left Syracuse in the teens I believe for Canada. The Hatfield Car was made in Cortland NY and faded away quickly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 03:36 pm:

Cunningham & Seldon was mfg in Rochester NY My daughter lives now in the renovated lofts in the Cunningham factory In the hslesys are the original pictures and designs of the cars and trucks they made


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 04:24 pm:

Cunningham & Seldon was mfg in Rochester NY My daughter lives now in the renovated lofts in the Cunningham factory In the hslesys are the original pictures and designs of the cars and trucks they made


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 08:38 pm:

All this, and except for a Wiki-link (unless I missed it?), no mention yet of the E R Thomas Motor Company (Thomas Flyer). They even have some early Ford connections with the Ford model K being a pilot car in the beginning of the 1908 New York to Paris race.
The other big name from Buffalo New York.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 08:47 pm:

"E. R. Thomas Motor Company was a manufacturer of motorized bicycles, motorized tricycles, motorcycles, and automobiles in Buffalo, New York between 1900 and 1919." jb
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Motor_Company


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 09:23 pm:

Brennan Motor Manufacturing Company (1897–1972) of Syracuse, New York, was an early manufacturer of automobile engines. From 1902 until 1908, the company produced the Brennan automobile however, after the demise of the automobile enterprise, the company again turned their focus to automobile engines and later marine engines. They were in business for 75 years when the company closed its doors in 1972.[1]


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 12:03 am:

Let's not forget that the car that "solves the automobile problem," was built in Tarrytown, New York. The Maxwell Bricoe Motor Co. began production there in 1904.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 04:37 pm:

One of my personal favorites and right in my hometown...

"By 1868, Ellis saw that marketing was an important part to the growth of the Continuous Oil Refining Company. While Binghamton Cylinder Oil was a good name, it was not one that was instantly recognizable for what it did. Ellis and his partners decided that a name change might improve sales of the product. But what to call it? I am sure a number of names were proposed — maybe Oildoesit, or Thing that Makes the Machine Go. But in the end, they decided on something much simpler — Valvoline!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By harold III Seattle on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 04:46 pm:

my Lozier was made in Plattsburg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 07:32 pm:

Lozier, From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lozier
"The company was founded in Plattsburgh, New York by Henry Abrahm Lozier, an Indiana-born sewing machine and bicycle manufacturer.
After selling his bicycle business, Lozier moved to Plattsburgh to manufacture boat engines. In 1900, he entered the automobile business. At his death in 1903, his son Harry took over the company.
Loziers were top line luxury cars and for a time were the most expensive cars produced in the United States. The 1910 model line featured cars priced between US$4,600 and US$7,750."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 11:39 am:

History of K.R. Wilson Tools

"Flat broke $3000.00 in debt but not discouraged, on Sept. 15th 1916, in an old barn at 1016 Main Street, Buffalo, New York, K. R. Wilson opened an exclusive Ford (commercial car) repair shop."




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 12:19 pm:

On a wall at the Northeast Classic Car Museum in Norwich NY is an outline of a NY State map listing most if not all automobile mfg. in NY, commercial vehicles excluded.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 01:34 pm:

...a most excellent museum!

Mercury Aircraft Inc. Penn Yan, NY.




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