Removing Windshield

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Removing Windshield
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Davis on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 03:17 pm:

I'm trying to remove the glass from a 26 coupe windshield frame, I'm going to have the frame sandblasted. I've remove the top piece but, can't get the glass to come out of the rest of the frame. Don't want get to aggressive afraid that I'll break the glass or spring the frame. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 03:20 pm:

My opinion, for what it's worth - :-)

If it's the original plate glass, it needs to be replaced with safety glass anyway, so just break it. Sandwich it between some big towels to contain the shards, then pull out the remaining pieces while wearing heavy work gloves.

If it is already safety glass, you might be better off taking it to a glass shop, they likely have more experience handling such things. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 05:44 pm:

Hey Mark, I'm pretty sure my car has the original plate glass also. Where would you go for safety glass cut to fit in these windshields?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 05:57 pm:

Any local glass shop can replace the original plate glass with laminated safety glass. I took mine to the local shop here in Hillsboro, Missouri (population 2825) and they did a great job for a hundred dollars or so. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Davis on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 06:03 pm:

It is safety glass that I had replaced about 50 years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 06:11 pm:

Since Richard is hoping to save his existing safety glass, can someone with more experience with rusted frames offer some tips? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 06:16 pm:

I've never had a problem removing windshield glass from rubber seals but I have broken them from tar sealed frames. The cost of a new frame for a 26 coupe is almost as much of a joke as the cost for the door. I'm having to restore our frame also as it's on the shop floor right now. All our glass was either missing or broke already so I haven't done this on a T yet. My only suggestion is technique: don't try to remove the glass. Instead, try to remove the frame.
Vern


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 06:34 pm:

Easiest way to remove the glass? Depends upon how it is held in.
Held solely by the brass channel and frame clamps on the ends of the frames (like they were originally)? The glass usually can be slipped out easily by simple flexing the frame very slightly off of the glass.
Held by rubber channels tightly fitting newer glass into the old frames? Can get tricky. I had to do some repair work to the frames for one of my cars. The glass had been replaced decades before with a slightly thinner safety glass. The modern type rubber channel was used to fit the glass to the frame. I am okay with the look. Frankly, I cannot afford to make any of my cars perfect, so if it works well and does not look really bad? I can live with it.
Several areas slipped apart with ease. Some came loose from the frame. Some came loose from the glass. Some of it, I could remove the rubber channel from the part it was stuck to after the glass and frame were separated. Some of it would not part ways easily at all. And one frame and glass would not separate enough to get apart at all.
So, I laid the glass flat. Put a few drops of gasoline on the glass around the stuck areas of the rubber channel. Let it sit for a day or two. The gasoline soaked in, and softened the rubber (only a few drops mind you!), and most of the remaining areas slid apart easily. I had one small area on the class and frame that was most stuck that I needed to flip over to the other side and sit for a day with a couple more drops of gasoline. I managed to remove all the glass, unbroken. And salvage the entire rubber channel.

If some other modern adhesive method was used? Good luck with that.


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