OT- T Era sewing machine table restored

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT- T Era sewing machine table restored
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen Bowers on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 01:49 pm:

Dont know if this is too off topic, but may be of interest.

My Grandmother passed away this spring, and among her possessions was a Standard Sewing Machine Co. stand. There was a note attached to it saying that her Mother (a seamstress) had purchased it used in 1912 when they were living in downtown Detroit. My Great-Great Grandfather was a mold maker for Ford (although he didnt work for the company until 1928)

I remember this table being on my grandparents porch when i was a child. Back then it had its original wood top with drawers. When i received it the original wood was long gone, and it was quite rusty.

I sand blasted the iron, replaced the bearings so it would operate (its a fun conversation piece) I also made a new wooden "connecting rod" based off of photos i have seen of these tables online. Also made a glass top for it. Someday if my woodworking skills get better i hope to re-create the very nice wooden top that was on it.

Originally i would guess that this was dipped black, but as a child i remember it being white, so i kept it white.

It is now on my screened in porch, hopefully ready for another century!





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 02:00 pm:

Nicely done...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 02:01 pm:

A little OT, but I can relate. Nice job on preserving the irons and your family memories.

Yet another hobby of mine is working on and resurrecting old sewing machines. I probably have over 50 of them. Pretty sure I have a Standard too. I was attracted to them because of their fascinating mechanical design and quality. I have machines from the 1860s through the 1940s.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 02:15 pm:

I have 2 singer treadle machines and one that has a modern head converted to work on a white base. I love those old machines


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 03:12 pm:

My parents have an old Singer that was cosmetically restored to use as an accent table in the late eighties. I remember as a kid I'd work the treadle as hard as I could to see how fast it would go and get in trouble just about every time. Even if I denied it, that telltale "ka-tunk-ka-tunk-ka-tunk" as it coasted down always gave me away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 03:21 pm:

Believe it or not in Thailand you can buy brand new treadle machines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 03:33 pm:

They work surprisingly well. I have 9 or 10 treadle machines now that are in complete working order and sew great. Yet another hobby of mine is Civil War reenacting. Here is a Golden Star machine made in 1909 sewing on an insignia.

gs


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 07:58 pm:

My Great Grandmother's Matron machine is in our living room.
I oiled the tar out that poor thing when I was a little boy.
Fascinating machines!
That connecting rod looks fantastic in the white framework!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, July 24, 2017 - 10:50 pm:

Along with the Edison Diamond Disk I have sitting next to it my Great Uncles Singer cobbler machine. Cool machine, if you want to sew a circle you just turn the needle head. It rotates 360 deg. Without changing the treadle direction you can rotate it and sew back over where stitched. I do use it some times. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 02:01 am:

My Grandmother preferred her treadle machine, she told me she "could control it better."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 06:06 am:

Mark - I have one of the those cobbler machines too - a Singer 29-4. I refurbished it last year, great for leather and heavy canvas.

c1
c2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 07:20 am:

I have my grandmother's Singer treadle machine. I remember her sewing on it when I was a kid. Unfortunately, in her later years, it just became a plant stand and the cover was ruined by water. The veneer is missing in a huge round spot revealing the wood underneath. It was made like a butchers block, tiny blocks of wood of varying size glued together. I don't know if that was supposed to be more stable, or just a way to use scrap wood, or both. At any rate, it's pretty much beyond repair on that upper side. Underneath, it's not so bad, so if you have it opened up in sewing mode, it's not so bad. The machine works, although I'm not too skilled in its use. I traced the serial number to 1909. My grandmother was born in 1913?, so obviously, she was not the original owner. My Mom says she doesn't know where it came from. Her Mom had had it since she could remember.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Csorba (Australia) on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 08:46 am:

I also have a lot. (I wish it was only 50)
Similar to Steve's 1870s to 1960s
I also like the different ways the same problems have been overcome.
Some of the attachments are ingenious as well.
It would be great to have one with family history.
Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 10:19 am:

Stephen; Looks good!
My cobbler is the same model. Mine is as found except a lot cleaner then found! :-) Because of my bad foot most of the time I use the hand wheel. I also have the flat top table he made for it that fits around the arm. I did have to cut it down a bit was just way too big.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:07 am:

Hall, you can replace the veneer on that side, my grandmother's sewing machine needs that done too.
It takes a big of patience, but it can be done!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:49 am:

This is a great topic. It is nice you have kept this. I picked up a "Bartlett" 50 years ago at the Salvation Army for $5. It gathers dust and other items but is fun to have around. Those wonderful cast frames are delightful.
I recall a fellow who made his meager living traveling from place to place with one in his trunk. He would upholster truck seats for cash whenever he needed a bite to eat or a new bottle of Jack Daniel's. He and his lady friend were unforgettable. My Uncle had me supervise him as he did his truck seat.
I haven't used the Bartlett but it has a lot of attachments and will be fun to use some day.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:52 am:

My grandmother was a bookkeeper for the Singer dealer in Mankato, MN and later Minneapolis in the 1920s and early 1930s.

I have her 1920s Singer fan and her 1920s Singer electric sewing machine, both which she purchased as an employee.

We also have my great grandmother's Singer treadle machine which was always well cared for and in excellent condition.

My father has a 1920s Singer commercial machine - I believe a 31-15 - which he has used for upholstery although it is really a heavy duty tailoring machine.

Treadle machines are typically not worth much - huge supply coupled with very low demand. Folks selling them on Craigslist believe they are worth a fortune. However, at estate sales in my area they can be listed for as low as $25 and still not go out the door.

If you want to make money on sewing machines, Singer Featherweights is where the action is.

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 02:03 pm:

Steve B.,

My soon-to-be wife has a treadle Singer that was in her family. It needs a "new", (better), lid, (the board that hinges over to reveal the machine beneath). Hers has most of the veneer missing. Easier to replace than repair I believe. Do you have any parts machines that may have a decent lid on it, that you may agree to part with?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

Jerry - Not likely. Singer made many different styles of treadle cabinets over nearly a 100 years (dozens of them) and out of different types of wood veneer (walnut, oak , maple). I have a lot of extra heads (the machine itself), but not much in the way of extra cabinetry. You best bet is to watch craigslist/ebay in your area for a parts machine with the same cabinet. Or apply new veneer to the existing top. There are a number of tutorials/videos on the net on how to do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 05:38 pm:

A Singer 201 or 15-91 gear driven electric machine works well for sewing Model T upholstery including side curtains.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerald Blair on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 06:21 pm:

I used my grandmothers old singer to sew the top on my roadster.
1926 Singer Sewing machine sewing top for a 1926 Model T Roadster


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Lake Oswego, OR on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 06:59 pm:

What model T guy wouldn't find this interesting? It's mechanical, historic, involves metal work and wood work. No surprise that more than a few T folks have such machines. I had a great time years ago restoring the treadle machine my great grandmother had passed down. Several generations of my family used it. Now it mostly rests after all that hard work. I suppose it is retired and enjoying life.......

Watch out though. These sewing machines can be just as addicting as any model T.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 08:04 pm:

Here is the machine goes with the original poster's treadle base.

std


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Bond on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 08:52 pm:

Wow Steve, didn't realize you were also into Sewing Machines! I just refinished one we've had around the house for years. My daughter is looking for one like this - it's called a Parlor Cabinet model. Let me know if you come across anything like it at a good price.
Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 07:12 am:

Parlor cabinets came in many styles also. They are really the top-of-the-line models. That one of yours is gorgeous. I see them now and then on C-list, but they often needs some work. I'll keep my eyes open for one.

This is really drifting off topic, but if anyone is interested, here is a thread about an 1870s era Howe sewing machine I resurrected last year.

http://www.victoriansweatshop.com/post/starting-to-work-on-my-howe-model-a-82007 17?highlight=howe&trail=50


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 12:24 pm:

Terry,

Very interesting. I've never seen or heard of a parlor model before. That is really pretty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 09:38 am:

Terry - here's a parlor cabinet Singer on craigslist.

https://fredericksburg.craigslist.org/atq/d/antique-treadle-sewing-machine/62210 15813.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 08:50 pm:

Same parlor cabinet in Minneapolis - different model machine and in better shape:

https://minneapolis.craigslist.org/hnp/atq/d/parlor-cabinet-sewing-machine/61939 66062.html


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