Rustoleum. not any better.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Rustoleum. not any better.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menteer on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:30 am:

After saying I would never use Rustoleum again, I had a weak moment and thought I would give it a second chance, hoping for better rust protection than the average primer. Mistake, the product is worse than ever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:39 am:

Rust can form under any paint, whatever the quality. That's why I prep before I paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:52 am:

We all try our best to prep. Check out RustBullet paints.
https://www.rustbullet.com/automotive


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:54 am:

Are you using "Rattle Can" or the stuff in the cans that you dilute and run through your spray gun? Preping with Phosphoric acid on steel really helps!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menteer on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:55 am:

I did have the parts sandblasted before primer. The problem is that it clogs at least 3 tips before you can finish one can, and it goes on grainy. They told me that I didnt shake it well enough. wrong


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:58 am:

If there is an area on which you are painting which is rusted all the way through, unless you paint both sides (which is difficult in some hard to get to places) moisture can get behind the paint and continue the rust.

Many years ago I lived about 2 miles from the ocean and our next door neighbor had a car which had been in an accident. It was a station wagon, built in the 50's. The entire top panel had been replaced and welded around the edge. Then the welds were ground and filled so that the outside surface was immaculate. The inside was not painted but was covered by the headliner upholstery. A few years later there were holes all around the area which had been welded. The ocean fog and mist contains salt which is quite corrosive and the car was parked outside where almost every night there was mist and fog.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 12:02 pm:

I have had some luck squeezing more product out of the newer cans of Rustoleum by holding the can upside down from the first use while spraying. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 12:26 pm:

Rustoleum has long been my second favorite. I recently discovered it can give shelving that added water protection.
I am sure this is a very rare occurrence.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 01:57 pm:

I use the rattle cans of Rustoleum satin black for chassis parts. It needs no primer. Before painting I prep with a 50% solution of phosphoric acid. Spray it on, wipe it dry, and let it air dry before painting. So far it works well for me. My only problem with the Rustoleum so far is that some batches of satin finish are a little too close to glossy to suit me.

For body parts, which should be glossy, I use rattle cans of appliance epoxy enamel. It's also best without primer. I do fill orange peel and dings before painting when necessary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 02:18 pm:

Rustoleum lost me years ago. Color is inconsistent among batches and their aerosol products are terrible. I had shelves full of brand new cans in a climate-controlled environment that simply would not spray (like Mark, I could get a few passes if I held the can at some odd angle - usually upside down). If I have to paint something now, I use Krylon. Zero issues with Krylon - consistent color and clean, easy spraying.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 05:16 pm:

I've got a shelf like yours with 3/4 full cans that won't spray. It's not the tip it's in the can where it stops up. Not just primer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 05:19 pm:

Me to Steve. 10 or 15. And 3/4 full that won't spray. It's not the cap. It's in the can. I've been using that stuff since I was a kid. Long time ago. Not any more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 08:12 pm:

Use POR-15.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 10:03 pm:

Where do you get the Phosphoric Acid?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo, Milford MI on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 10:29 pm:

Once they are used once, the newer (probably a few years now) style Rustoleum cans that spray from any angle need to be shaken _a lot_ or they will plug.
When they plug, they usually plug in the can, not the tip and then they are junk.

I thought I learned my lesson, but just last week I junked a 1/2 full can of primer because I did not shake it enough. I would rather have the old style cans...

-Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 10:36 pm:

Fred,



One gallon will last me several years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 01:26 am:

Now I get it. A phosphatizing agent!
I was like Wha? Phosphoric acid? Wha?
NOT crazy talk.
Industrial "soaps" That I've used at work 30 years ago had phosphatizing agents in them to help the primer adhere better.
Some steel panels would get a bit of a blue sheen to them after washing before going into the paint booth.
Very interesting! Nowadays, they just blast it, blow the dust off and put plastic dust on the parts and bake.

I also see someone has a can of Van Sticky (Van Sickle) gloss something or other on their shelf along with that oozing can.
Good canned paint until I hear/know otherwise. My go-to paint for the equipment I had my hands on then and still.
I can still smell the fresh paint after several days. :-)
A good buddy calls them Foo-foo cans. :-)

It's possibly those silly supply tubes so the product will come out at almost any angle. Mistake.
I like to tip the can upside down to clean out the tube and nozzle! Then it's good for next time.
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 06:05 am:

I use Rust-Oleum Rust Reformer as a primer on old steel that has been wire brushed, Permatex Rust Treatment on the really bad rusted metal that I'm trying to salvage, and Rust-Oleum Etch primer on new metal (which has acid already in it). Rust-Oleum Etch primer is also used here on stainless steel as the first coat. Then I use the white primer over top before using final color (unless it's going black).
Vern (The guy with the rustiest T)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 06:28 am:

My local Home Depot stocks phosphoric acid in gallons. The price beats the DuPont Metal Prep I had been using for prior to going to this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 08:56 am:

Thanks Steve and Tom.
Is this stuff diluted or used straight? I'd like to have enough to put the molasses derusted parts in after the molasses does it's thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 09:07 am:

I agree with Richard Moore - it's not the tip. I always put the tips in a can of paint thinner after use (I invert the can and spray until clear) . I still find a disproportionate number of Rustoleum cans won't spray after the first use. I also agree with Tim Wrenn - POR 15 is excellent, but choose your color wisely - it's almost impossible to paint over.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 09:27 am:

Fred, I dilute mine 50/50. That's more than strong enough. Spray it on and wipe it dry with paper towels. It will destroy cloth. Wear gloves. I don't know about the Klean Strip. I haven't tried it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 10:10 am:

Been using Rustoleum for years. Great stuff. The only thing I don't like is their new nozzles for the rattle cans. However, Rustoleum was kind enough to send me a bag of new nozzles free of charge!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 10:13 am:

Larry, are you able to use the content of an entire can with the new nozzles? If yes, what is your secret? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 10:22 am:

What's wrong with a brush ? Simple, easy, convenient, no overspray and little waste.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 10:40 am:

What is this RUST stuff you are talking about? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 11:33 am:

Scott,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 11:51 am:

Holy cats. That looks awful. I'm glad we don't have any of those bugs here in the desert.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 06:02 am:

I've been dealing with clogged spray cans for years, mostly ones that have been used and sat for awhile. I just clamp a 3/32" welding rod (or anything else about that size that is handy) in a vise. Then, I put the offending can up to it, with an old rag wrapped around it, and push. That will blow out the semi hardened paint and it can then be used. Sometimes, it may take more than one try. That being said, as far as I am concerned, there is no excuse to have to do that with a relatively new can. I DO save all of my used nozzles and clean them out with a shot of brake cleaner with the straw. You never know when you'll need one. :-) Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 07:10 am:

I've been able to buy the equivalent of Metal Prep at Home Depot for years. It comes in a quart bottle.


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