Hard Rubber Composite Steering wheel fixes?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Hard Rubber Composite Steering wheel fixes?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 05:27 pm:

Anyone ever repaired a cracked hard rubber steering wheel using the steering wheel restoration kit sold by Eastwood, or maybe just some good old J.B. weld or some other concoction or method?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 05:44 pm:

I think you can get replacements if you want instead
http://www.ebay.com/itm/MODEL-T-FORD-NEW-16-STEERING-WHEEL-RIM-HUGE-SALE-SAVE-AL MOST-33-DO-NOT-MISS-/152633971624?hash=item2389b193a8:g:PoYAAOSws4JW7aN3&vxp=mtr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 05:57 pm:

Ed, I was TRYING to sneak this thread in--its not a "T" wheel, just made of the same stuff!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 06:08 pm:

$22.50 is a a very reasonable price. I would not want to use a cracked wheel which has been repaired. It is too important a part to do such a repair on. You can get wood wheels or look for a good used one at swap meets but don't try to fix one which has cracked all the way through.

Although you could probably steer it with the spider, you run a risk of accident and also risk of injuring your hand or arm.
Norm
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 07:34 pm:

If you have a hard rubber wheel that does not screw onto the rim then replacing the rim is not an option.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 07:37 pm:

The Model T steering wheel is not hard rubber, it is made of Fordite. It is was a composite material made of rubber, straw, sulphur, silica, and other ingredients. What works for Fordite may not work of other "normal" hard rubber wheels.

Here is a past thread on repairing Ford wheels:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/200802.html?1301454438

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker, Oklahoma City on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 07:51 pm:

Filling all the cracks completely with a good epoxy has worked for me in the past. Then, once it cures, you can always sand it smooth and even paint it if you'd like.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Wednesday, July 26, 2017 - 11:26 pm:

Kwik poly wood resign what i use the nice coat of semi gloss paint


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ivan on Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 04:24 am:

I fixed some digs and gouges some years back using 2 pot clear Epoxy Resign (as used in fibreglass boats/ surfboards)mixed with a little black tinting paste (same source)and tiny pieces of woven fibreglass cloth to fill the holes / help the resin "bulk up" in the holes.
Note however, to use "Epoxy" resin as these days most boats are built with 'polyester' resign and it does not stick as well to "foreign" surfaces.
When set, sand off with W&D paper. Final finish is optional.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Sims--Reed City,Mich. on Thursday, July 27, 2017 - 09:00 am:

I have repaired broken steering wheels by drilling into the ends of both pieces, Then I use a short piece of all thread rod smaller than the holes and then put JB weld or other epoxy in both holes, Press the threaded rod into half of one end of the break with half sticking out, carefully spring the ends apart enough to get the rod into the other half of the break. Clamp together tight. Sand the joint and paint. Much eaisier if wheel is in two pieces. Only need about one and one half inch piece of all thread.


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