Which color would be best for a 1919 Model T Coupe

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Which color would be best for a 1919 Model T Coupe
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christine Barrow on Friday, July 28, 2017 - 09:33 pm:

We have a 1919 Model T Coupe which we are trying to sell and have the color a forest green with black fenders and running board.

We have looked online and found that there are some that are forest green and some that are all black.

Which would be better to sell?

We have an asking price of $12,500.00 at the present time and willing to negotiate.

Are we asking too much, or too little?

What can we do to have a better chance of selling it?

Thank you for your help in advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Friday, July 28, 2017 - 09:40 pm:

All '19 Fords came from the factory in black.
The 1926 coupes were green.
There is also resale red, but I wouldn't.
Since all years had black running boards, fenders and splash aprons black for the rest of the body would be the easiest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Friday, July 28, 2017 - 09:48 pm:

Don't worry about the color. Ebay would be your best chance of selling it quickly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Friday, July 28, 2017 - 09:58 pm:

Christine,
You might be asking too much or you might be asking too little.
Quality photographs away from clutter and direct bright sunlight are way better. Also a pleasant or interesting complete description of the history goes a long way.
Vern


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, July 28, 2017 - 11:14 pm:

I wouldn't even entertain the thought of buying it unless it was black but that's just me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 12:21 am:

While black is the correct color for 1919, some buyers won't care about that. I would leave it green and sell it that way.

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG99.html

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG100.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Macleod on Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 09:28 am:

I looked over the price guide and would agree that it is pretty accurate though the cars '09-14 seem to be experiencing quite a lot of appreciation, particularly 1912 and earlier.

A brand new paint job with nothing else done is going to be a red flag so don't go there. Clean the car up as much as you can, and if at all possible get it running and driving.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but a non-running green coupe of this era is probably a $3500-4500 car at best. If it runs and drives well you might get another $1500 out of it, unless its condition is absolutely pristine.

I do have an alternative solution. Get the car running and driving well. Buy a plane ticket to Michigan after enrolling in the Gilmore Car Museum Model T driving school. At Gilmore, learn to drive the car well then keep the car and drive the pants off of it. Trust me, that will be the cheapest and most enjoyable use of your time and energy with this car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 09:36 am:

Black. It's a '19.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 09:52 am:

The most economically sound approach would be to get the car running and driving well. Leave the current color scheme as-is. You will never recoup the amount of money you put into a decent quality new paint job in the net sales price, and a cheap paint job will lower the price. Advertise it as widely as possible, and remember that not all markets are the same. In some areas of the country prices some to be higher than others. Around the upper Midwest I would think the that car would command someplace between $5K-$7K. Buyer from other areas will have to deal with shipping, so that may lower their offers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 10:15 am:

Put it up exactly the way it is. Yeah, black would be correct but as stated that might not bother a potential buyer. Honestly at $12.5K I think you're high but again you never know. You say you'll negotiate so just give it a go. Good pics and an honest description are a must to draw interest. Just do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 10:24 am:

Better to sell would be green as there is no cost of changing the color. Assuming the car is stock (aside from the color) yes you are asking too much. There is the possibility there is something special in the chassis that would increase the price, but it would have to be very special. West coast, mid west, heck every but here seems to have much better prices. If you can find quality cheap shipping that would help with the sale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 10:28 am:

$12,500 seems high to me, but with only the information provided, an honest answer to the price question cannot be had. Typically, open cars bring more then closed ones. They are much better parade cars. The "Blue Book" and other price guides are useless - When I bought my '27 touring car, the price guides had it at something like $13,000. In New England where I bought the car, the actual "getting" price on similar cars wasn't anywhere near that. If you inherited the car, the only thing that I would do is get it running. It is worth much more as a running car. I agree with Kevin, a bad paint job will actually hurt the car's value, and you will never recover the money that a good one will cost.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, July 29, 2017 - 11:17 am:

If you repaint it to the original black you will have more money into it than what its worth for a lot of people.
A general rule is if you restore a car you "might not get back what you have in it". If I thought I could get 10-11 thousand for it I would sell it like it is. If somebody came along for that money I would make the deal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, July 30, 2017 - 12:22 am:

Last year I purchased a restored(1970's) 1919 coupe. After it was restored it was never toured, just a couple of parades. It runs and drives and is a very good restoration, not perfect but as stated very nice. It starts quickly, runs and drives well. I paid $5000.00 with a good Washington title and age correct license plates. Mine is black on black.

Now that said I would not even consider selling mine for $12.000.00.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brooks Schlieben on Sunday, July 30, 2017 - 10:42 am:

It should be black, but a T person already knows that - and a non-T person won't care.

Put it on Ebay with a reasonable reserve, and a low starting bid. See how it goes. The market can be a kind, or harsh, mistress.


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