The TT lives

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: The TT lives
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Rhoads on Tuesday, August 01, 2017 - 07:59 am:

so we got the TT running yesterday but the video is much to large to post. Since we did not have a carb we went to the bitsa T and borrowed hers. Boiled it for 2 hours after taking it apart and still had to clean for an hour , made some new gaskets, took a shoulder off the needle valve and got her running on 2 cylinders. Going to visit George House this morning to check all coils and borrow a hub puller to see what the brakes look like. I love the fact that these lil cars and trucks were built to be maintained by the owner as long as said owner can think thru a problem and work with their hands. But it sure helps to have someone like George to call and check if your fixin to have your hat handed to you before you leep off the cliff


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, August 01, 2017 - 08:16 am:

Yep! Always nice to have someone close to tell you what to do next.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, August 01, 2017 - 01:50 pm:

Put the video on Youtube, then post a like to the Youtube video here, like this. :-)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1g2Rxi4hqGg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, August 01, 2017 - 01:51 pm:

Oops, that's link, not like! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Wednesday, August 02, 2017 - 01:14 am:

She lives!
Don't be afraid to caress the points on fussy coils with your fingers as the engine is running.
Sometimes, it will get that coil firing again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Rhoads on Thursday, August 03, 2017 - 11:00 pm:

picpicpicpicSo today, in the vein of "repairable by the owner/operator", the water pump was rebuilt, the petcock from the radiator was rebuilt, the lower radiator hose casting was removed (yes 5 brass rivet's were removed)and a puddle of solder was removed. refurbing the casting, rivetin, and soldering will come tomorrow and then on to repairing 2 leaking tubes in the radiator


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Friday, August 04, 2017 - 11:19 am:

Word of caution in regards to the "early" style of petcock - with no spring retention on the taper as in the "later" style - both radiator & crankcase, that style can seem to open itself considering the amount of vibration these old contraptions are subject to !!!

They have that "old" timey look but I've seen considerable engine damage done as a result of that type of petcock opening when it shouldn't have.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Rhoads on Friday, August 04, 2017 - 09:12 pm:

and if I replaced it with a new one then I would be told "that's not correct" give me a break I am doing as the ford book says" fix it yourself or take it to a ford garageman. The most fun is trying to fix it not throw $100 bills at it. I appreciate your advice but if you see steam pull over don't keep driving and blow your motor up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Friday, August 04, 2017 - 11:18 pm:

No worries here, Buddy - just a friendly word of attention ! I was making reference to the same style petcock that opened up on it's own allowing most of all 4 quarts of oil run out of the crankcase - not mine but a customers '26 Coupe.

Get after it & have fun !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Rhoads on Friday, August 04, 2017 - 11:56 pm:

sorry to seem terse. The old style has a crush washer under the screw that acts as a spring, If the Valve turns freely ...repair or replace


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 06:21 am:

Relax, Michael. I had a TT once and am collecting parts to build another. One of the things I appreciate about them is that they were used by guys who built/fed/repaired America. Men who kept them running by any means possible and I applaud your efforts to fix yours as cheaply as possible. Mine was allegedly 1921 with 1926/27 fenders. At shows people would point this out but I never "corrected" them. Too afraid that some long dead blue collar man would come back and haunt me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 07:09 am:

Michael, its not such an issue with the radiator drain. As you say, steam means stop and top it up.

Steve's word of warning is more for the crankcase where you may not see a petcock open and leave your oil on the road instead of inside the engine. Believe me, that gets real expensive real fast! There is a good reason for Henry to change top the spring loaded petcock to prevent unexpected valve openings.

I have repaired a few petcocks, but getting a good seal can be frustrating. I clean them up real good, then put a grit paste like - oh I forget its name - Timesaver maybe? -- between the valve and the body then whirr them in a drill back and forward a few times to bed the valve back into the body. Start with a coarser grit then move to a real fine paste. I use metal polish paste for the last laps.
This method only works with the 'spring loaded' petcock which has a 'tang' on the end you can fit in the drill chuck.

My theory is a that little oil seepage is not a big worry from the transmission petcocks given how much oil comes out of other places so a perfect seal is desirable but not essential.

The petcock you may want to buy new is for the sediment bowl under the fuel tank as when the truck is sitting in the garage it is not a good place to have fuel leaking out. (I have managed to 'save' my sediment bowl petcock using the method above).

Have fun - if it works for you, then it works!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adrian Whiteman, New Zealand on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 07:10 am:

I meant to say don't spin them too fast in the drill either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Rhoads on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 08:44 am:

it was a trying day with the radiator. I used valve grinding paste for the refurbishment of the petcock. I am about to throw in the towel on the rad repair as the heat keeps popping new holes it the upper hose bib and I haven't even started on the tubes but the $900 price tag for a new one is a great motivator. If anyone knows of an alternative to replacement I would greatly appreciate it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 09:42 am:

Sounds like you have the same problem I do: lack of soldering expertise. It will cost more than doing the work yourself, but a good radiator repair shop should be able to fix it for a lot less than the cost of a new one. That is, if cleaning it out and repairing leaks are all it needs. But if the fins have separated from the tubes it's time to bite the bullet and spend the dough for a new Berg's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Rhoads on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 01:15 pm:

with your blessing. yes the fins are delicate and most are not attached and the inlet and outlet are to far gone to patch anymore. lesson #1 know when to fold and move on. will let you know where it ends up


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 01:23 pm:

Google "Cool Gel". It's used by plumbers to help keep pipes and fiitings cool when soldering, so you don't melt the solder in areas that are already soldered. Just be sure to clean it off when done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 06:52 pm:

Long post. Sorry Michael.
I say don't give up quite yet. Perhaps take a day or so to reflect and re-assess. :-)
When I was teenager, I took the rad from my '29 International truck chassis to the rundown little radiator shop downtown for repair.
I thought he'd do a bang up job! $110 or $125 dollars later (which I found VERY hard to spend then), I took the rad home confident it was ready to hold water.
It still leaked somewhere on the bottom tank. Ugh.
I took my little torch and started in on it. Yep, I chased hot spots and lost solder but I finally got it and it still holds and that was 30+ years ago!
IF I had known about cool gel or "wet blankets" ;-) (cold wet pieces of cloth/rags to keep the other spots cool) it would have been quicker.
Or a buddy with a garden hose?
I just walked out to my Crappy Lizzhe T again to see how bad that rad is and it looks tough but it holds water and cools perfectly.
Granted, I do have a small old pump on it (didn't have a water inlet at the time) and acrylic latex caulk and silicone up on top to hold the water in but it has never overheated/boiled over etc.
Your old radiator may do its job just fine after you get it fixed. Satisfaction.
Unless you're ready to go buy another rad, try again. But I can be quite a contrarian here!
:-)
Duane


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 08:30 pm:

Michael, I have some radiators on Hunter road. I have to go there tomorrow and I'll measure them. You need a 'tall' radiator. And I'll tell you in person who makes the best and most reasonably priced radiators..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, August 05, 2017 - 11:57 pm:

Old radiators are funny things, I have seen a few beautiful radiators that could not keep a car cool on a cold day. Or, a few that went the other way. I had a beat up ugly old low radiator for years. Two smashed in areas, one with a couple pinched-off tubes. Many areas of broken and some very loose fins. The upper and lower inlet/outlet were patched up with epoxy of some sort, top tank dented. Shall I keep going? I used it on several of my T projects over the years. Drove it on quite a few tours, I think it went on at least two 200 mile Endurance Runs, one of which had some tough hills, and ambient temperatures over 100 degrees. I never had an over-heating problem with that radiator on any car. I would use it to get a car put together, run it for maybe a year or so, then find a better looking radiator to put on the car. No car ever did better with the nicer looking radiator. They just looked better. Eventually, the radiator went on a car that I sold fairly cheap. Many times I have wished I had kept it.

Michael R, A dirty little secret these days is that a lot of radiator shops do most of their repairs with epoxy. You might try it on your inlet and outlet necks. Clean very well first, then allow to dry thoroughly. I like J B Weld, the slow stuff. It holds better at slightly higher temperatures than the quick stuff does. That makes a big difference for a radiator. I have done that a few times on old radiators. I have also fixed a few tube leaks with it. Sometimes, a leak inside near the middle of the core can be "fixed" using the slow set (Two Ton) near clear epoxy by dribbling the stuff down into the core, then rolling the radiator around to get a good covering on and around the leak. The upside to doing this, is that you don't have to ruin the looks of the radiator in order to make it functional again.
Epoxy WILL NOT reconnect thermal conductivity between the tubes and fins. Epoxy is a decent insulation against thermal conductivity. For that reason, do not get carried away with lots of epoxy all over the thing. Just where a specific repair is needed.
Good luck! Don't give up yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Rhoads on Sunday, August 06, 2017 - 09:25 am:

Oh don't get me wrong , I am obsessive mostly to a fault. After 2 days of understanding the radiator, then the tedious disassembly(what were they thinking when they cast the bottom hose bib) and then chasing leaks. I walked away for 2 days and will show up Monday morning with a bunch of daisy's. Thanks for the clear epoxy tip. will update Monday. George I will call you today


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