OT - Using a Model T Era Waffle Maker

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: OT - Using a Model T Era Waffle Maker
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker, Oklahoma City on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 12:27 am:

The misses and I volunteer for a non-profit organization called Bethel Foundation that helps single mothers and children in need. Occasionally, something gets donated that's really unique and they give it to us.

Well, the misses went in and saw they had an old waffle maker. Turns out it was REALLY old... About 1920's. It was made by the Club Electric Company, is all nickel plated, has little wooden handles, and even has its original power cord (which is in perfect shape).

They didn't want to give it up at first, but when she explained how old it is, and that it wouldn't be the best choice for a single mother in need due to its age, they relented and allowed us to have it.

I gave it a good electrical inspection, and found it to be quite sound. So the misses made some vanilla Chai waffle batter, we oiled up the plates, and gave it a try.

The first one didn't come out so good, but soon we had it down to an art and were making some awesome waffles!

They just don't built appliances like that anymore!





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 01:18 am:

I have about a dozen waffle irons.
Here is our favorite.
It's an Electrohot.
I did a complete dis-assembly and bead blasted the plates to white metal.
As you can see it is well seasoned and works great.

Be_Zero_Be




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 01:34 am:

P.S. Nearly all modern waffle irons today make "Belgian" style waffles.

These old ones make the best "Original " Style waffles :-) :-) :-)

Enjoy your new found memory :-)

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 08:00 am:

I remember growing up with those old waffle irons that were handed down by the family elders, along with electric frying pans. Energy efficient? Probably not, but they sure cooked well. Unfortunately, many moves later they have disappeared never to be seen again. I still have a pair of vintage original Westinghouse roasters that continue to cook for countless graduation parties of friends who borrow them and deer camp dinners.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 08:06 am:

Mmmmmmmm Waffles is it still breakfast time?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 09:30 am:

So what's the difference between Belgian and original style? I've got an old one that sits on a wood stove. It makes very good waffles too, so long as I keep it well lubed. Otherwise they stick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 10:34 am:

Steve, I found this on line....

"Belgian waffles have deeper pockets than American-style waffles, which makes them great for holding lots of little pools of syrup. The texture is also lighter and crispier.
To make a Belgian waffle, you need a waffle iron with a deeper, larger grid pattern. Most Belgian waffle recipes are yeast-based, to get that crispy texture. But you also can use a waffle batter that uses beaten egg whites for lightness."


Extra bit of trivia. The Dutch (i.e. "Flemish") word for waffle is wafel and for waffle iron is wafelijzer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 10:43 am:

I have noted making waffles, the first one never comes out right but gets eaten anyway. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 10:46 am:

Thanks Dick - I learn something new every day!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 11:13 am:

I cook with dutch ovens all the time. Most of my cooking is over wood fire. Waffle irons like very high heat. A waffle should only take 2-3 minutes. They will be light and crispy. 5-8 minutes they will be tough. Enjoy your iron, Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 11:23 am:

My niece's wedding on Saturday proved to me there is never a bad time for waffles. The waffle bar that opened at 9PM was a hit and I elbowed my way in for a photo as well as a waffle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 11:53 am:

Be very careful when using this thing since the cord is usually very old and used a high temperature wire insulation so you cannot just rewire the thing with something you buy at a big box store. With most old things electrical they CAN be used but need to be inspected very very carefully and don't leave anything with an ON/OFF switch like old radios and things plugged in when not in use. Even with a switch on the device the power cord is still hot all the time and often very brittle due to its age and heat/cool cycles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker, Oklahoma City on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 02:30 pm:

John,

I appreciate the warning, but no need to worry. I'm a licensed electrician, as well as an electronic technician. I've worked on plenty of antique electronics and radios to know all-too-well exactly what you are talking about!

The cord on this waffle maker is in perfect shape (proof that they don't make rubber like they used to). The unit does not have an on/off switch, and must be unplugged when it is used.

I like to convert antique radios, if possible, to a three-pronged cord with a true grounded chassis, but that's not easily feasible on a typical AA5 radio, short of adding an isolation transformer. Best you can do is convert them to a polarized cord...

But I have converted lots of old tube guitar amps, adding a three pronged cord and doing away with the "dead man's cap." Then, playing the electric guitar means that the guitar is much less likely to be "electric." :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Monday, August 07, 2017 - 03:31 pm:

Cameron - Thanks for the input. We have done a lot of the same things during our life. For a time I repaired SUN and other amplifiers for their factory but they got too cheap for me to make any money at all doing it but the new shop screwed up so many things that the SUN dealers asked me to repair the amps but to bill THEM for my services and they would pay my old rate and so I did that. I think the end user just got billed a bit more but the dealer was taking in almost more repairs than I could deal with. The move to the "cheaper" repair shop ended up with me getting more business and the repairs were in fact more costly since the other shop wasn't doing so good at making accurate diagnosis. I also worked on some Fender amps and a few AMPEG units. Most were decent designs. They pretty much all used 6L6's in the final amp and if the speaker was in the same cabinet and one used an electric bass.... the tubes arced inside from the elements coming loose due to the excessive vibes and it was lights out. I owned a pre CBS Fender Super Reverb amp but I sold it and regret doing that to this very day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Blancard, Fredericksburg Va on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 02:24 pm:

I've got the coffee pot to go with the waffle maker. Lets get together and have breakfast!
pot


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 05:50 pm:

I use my 1920s Gilchrist malted milk machine on a regular basis. This is one of two that came out of my grandparents' saloon in downtown Minneapolis. My brother has the other one.

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