Rewinding a generator armature.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Rewinding a generator armature.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 06:51 am:

A few months ago, Toon Boer from Klaaswaal in the Netherlands, showed us how to rewind a generator armature.

At that time I took it as a challenge. During these months I took a lot of information and bought what was needed to do the job.

Yesterday, as every Monday since the last 11 months, I looked after my parents 87 and 90 years old and today we have a bad weather.
There was some time to spare so I took up the challenge and tried to rewind a generator armature.
Here is what I made out of it.

Thanks Toon for all the help and advice.
It just need to be tested, coated, baked and cleaned.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 08:31 am:

Looks good. I don't see much insulation though. What did you use for the slot covers (inserts)?




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 08:57 am:

Stephen,
The slots are insulated by two U-forms 0.25mm gasket paper one is in the bottom and the second one slides over the first to close the tunnel.
This all will be blocked by a half round 5mm width hard wood stick before the armature will be coated.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 12:28 pm:

Andre, nice work. I worked in a coal power plant for many years and watched as all different sizes of machines were re wound. About 30 years ago, I tried and have successfully rewound a number of motors and generators. I used to get my supplies, slot sticks, fish paper, etal from the local GE repair shop, but they are now gone. Since I am rather new to the Model T, I have not tried any coil winding on it's generator or starter. Seems most of the bad armatures I have seen generally have a very bad commutators and are not savable. Did you use a coil form to make the individual coils and then place them in the slots? I always had to experiment with the size of the form to obtain a finished product that I could easily assemble and to fit back into the frame. Again nice work. Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 - 01:55 pm:

Here a few photos of what it was and the slots closed by the wood sticks. The armature is cleaned and ready to be tested, coated and baked.

The armature had a short to the ground the commutator needed some attention but was usable.
The coil winding was done on the armature.
It was tricky the first three coils but I think this was because it was the first time I did it.
I have two more armature to practice.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 04:56 pm:

Hi
Very interesting!! What gauge of wire and how many turns per location? How much wire total?
Thx
Les


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 05:10 pm:

Very cool. I want to learn to do that for mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 12:37 am:

Les,
The gauge of wire is 0.85mm and there are 10 turns each coil. Each coil takes about 2.1m of wire and there are 21 coils.

After cleaning the empty core you need to number each connection on the commutator and each slot on the core.
The wiring start low at connection 1 on the commutator and go to slot 4 on the core than to slot 9 and make 10 turns between slot 4 and 9.
The end of the wire is connected to connection 11(high) on the commutator. Connection 2 to slot 5 to slot 10 (10 turns) connection 12 and so on till you made the 21 coils.
The high connections are only made when the 21 low connections and coils are finished.
This done you need to "stitch" each coil that go to each slot. After the stitching, close the slots with insulation paper and seal it with a wooden stick. All done you need to seal the assembly with insulation varnish and bake it. After cleaning it all up and having tested the armature on shorts and on a growler it is ready to be used.

After having it done I understood why the price of a redone armature is that high but I enjoyed doing it and it will be done again.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 02:13 am:

This is the tread were it all started for me.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/596807.html?1450841738

Just enjoy.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 02:47 am:

Anyone wanting to do this should find a copy of an Lejay Electric Catalog/manual. They will tell you a lot about winding an armature. Good looking job. Here is a link. Dan.
https://www.scribd.com/document/3093121/LeJay-Manual


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 08:09 am:

Thanks Dan, I downloaded a copy from scribes. Very cool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 04:23 pm:

Andre
So that seems like 150ft of 20 gauge!!
Interesting project and thank you for the information. I've rewound various transformers and field coils, but never a armature. Maybe one in my future


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Friday, August 11, 2017 - 05:59 pm:

Les,
I don't say it was easy but if I can do it you can do it.
I will do it again, I have two more armature to practice.
I started working as a mechanic in 1976 in a workshop with cars, trucks an tractor, all Ford.
As I did my first steps in the model T world, in 1999, I needed skills I learned in school but I never used in the workshop.
Here I thought I found a solution to repair the generator myself but as I like to be sure doing it right it need to be tested and I arrived at the growler tests for the armature. I have a growler but this I never learned and did before myself. I saw it done but I like to understand what is happening during the tests . What is right and what is wrong
I am looking for someone who can tell me more about the growler tests, more as only the saw blade trick you find on Youtube.

I am 61 years old and 41 years of mechanic experience and I am still learning.
Tomorrow we are leaving for Egypte to make a 6 day scuba dive cruise in the Red Sea and hope to set Model T for one week a side but I think it is going with.

See You in 8 days
Andre
Belgium


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